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Illinois
Coal & Coal Mining
History & Genealogy

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Woodford County, Illinois
Featuring Coal Mining
      Woodford County is a county located in the north central part of the state of Illinois.
            40.79° N, 89.21° W
In 2000 the population was 35,469, and in 2010, the population was 38,664.
 
      The county seat of Woodford County, Illinois is Eureka
 
      Woodford County was formed in 1841 out of Tazewell and McLean Counties, and was named for Woodford County, Kentucky, which was named for General William Woodford, who was with General George Washington at Valley Forge.
 
      Woodford County has seventeen townships :
            Cazenovia, Clayton, Cruger, El Paso, Greene, Kansas, Linn, Metamora, Minonk, Montgomery, Olio, Palestine, Panola, Partridge, Roanoke, Spring Bay, Worth
 
      Some of the Cities, Towns, Villages and Communities are :
            Bay View Gardens, Benson, Cazenovia, Congerville, El Paso, Eureka, Germantown Hills, Goodfield, Kappa, Lowpoint, Metamora, Minonk, Panola, Roanoke, Secor, Spring Bay, Washburn
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Extract from The Woodford County History 2
Panola Township
      A coal shaft dug in 1888 struck a vein of water at a depth of 80 feet, preventing further digging, and the shaft was filled in.
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Coal Mines       Fatalities       Non-Fatal Casualties      Reference Sources

Woodford County, Illinois
Coal Mines

Eureka Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :
   Woodford County - Township 26 North, Range 1 West, Section 7
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Eureka Coal Mine   Eureka Coal Company   1886 -1887
[Source - No. 1, Index 5979]
 
1887 Annual Coal Report 4
      The Eureka Coal Co. claims to have found, in boring, a seam of coal 360 feet from the surface. It is claimed to be No. 2 seam which is 30 inches thick with 15 inches of cannel coal on top, making in all 3 feet 9 inches in thickness. In sinking they struck a sand bed 15 feet deep containing considerable water 70 feet below the surface. Two attempts were made to pass through this sand bed, but both were unsuccessful, and the stockholders became discouraged, and let it stand. Recently, however, an offer was made to put the shaft through the sand for a given sum ; the company accepted the offer and in six weeks the work was completed. The company then closed the mine indefinitely.

Metamora Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :
   Woodford County - Township 27 North, Range 3 West, Section 1
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Metamora Coal Mine   Metamora Coal Company   1870
[Source - No. 1, Index 5980]

Minonk Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :
   Woodford County - Township
Main shaft -- 28 North, Range 2 East, Section 7, SW SW NE
Escape Shaft (Original Shaft - old hoisting shaft -- 28 North, Range 2 East, Section 6, NE NW NE
Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 532 to 565 feet deep with an average coal seam of 2½ to 3 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Minonk Coal Mine No. 1   Minonk Coal Company   1869 -1873
Minonk Coal Mine No. 1   Miner T. Ames -- Chicago & Minonk   1873 -1883
Minonk Coal Mine No. 1   Chi & Minonk Coal & Coke Company   1883 -1891
Minonk Coal Mine No. 1   Chi & Minonk Coal & Tile Works   1891 -1901
Abandoned   Unknown   1901 -1904
Minonk Coal Mine No. 2   Minonk Coal Company   1904 -1924
Minonk Coal Mine No. 2   W. G. Sutton   1924 -1951
[Source - No. 1, Index 410]
Last production was reported in March 1951.
      The company was organized in 1869 and reached the Danville Coal [Seam] at a depth of 314 feet three years after the organization. This coal was low quality and the company was reorganized with different board members and the shaft was deepened to the Colchester Coal [Seam]. Lacking resources to invest in the machinery to actually mine the coal, the company was re-organized to give Miner Ames a controlling interest. The year of this transfer is uncertain, but probably at least one year passed to raise funds and lower the shaft the 200 feet between the Danville and Colchester Coals.
 
Extract from The Woodford County History 2
Chicago & Minonk Coal & Tile Works
      The Minonk Coal Company was incorporated in 1869 with Dr. Samuel Ewers as president and manager. The stock was fixed at $6,000 at $25 per share. Coal was found at a depth of 314 feet, the vein being four feet thick. The quality was poor and it was not thought advisable to work it, so the stock was sold and the company reorganized. The new company found a second vein of coal from two and a half to three feet in thickness at a depth of 553 feet.
      The company found itself unable to proceed with the work, so a partnership was formed with Miner T. Ames of Chicago, who furnished enough capital to proceed with the work for a time. The old stockholders could not keep up with their share of expenses, so they sold out to a company known as the Chicago & Minonk Coal and Coke Company, with Miner T. Ames as president and general manager, in which capacity he continued up to the time of his death January 13, 1890 The heirs then took charge of the property with Knowlton L. Ames as general manager.
(1896).
      A new cable engine was placed in the mine and about 300 men were employed in mining coal. The tile and brick works employed 100 men, and turned out an immense quantity of vitrified drain tile, paving brick, sidewalk brick and hollow brick every year. They had the largest car loading of drain tile at that time anywhere in the United States.
      At that time Thomas A. Edison had made two electric generators and, being a good friend of Miner T. Ames, gave him one of them so that he could have electric lights at the mine. When the big store at the mine was destroyed by fire a new store was established up town at the corner of Chestnut and Seventh streets. In order that this store could have electric lights instead of coal oil lamps, they strung a pair of wires from the mine along Oak street to the store. They fastened light bulbs to these wires which gave Minonk the first electrically lighted street in the world.
      In 1900, a second mine was sunk about a mile north of the first one. The first mine was closed and the second mine was operated about a year and then it closed. It was idle until about 1904 when W. C. Sutton and J. S. Webber of Rutland leased it and started operation. A short time later, Mr. Webber moved out of town and Mr. Sutton purchased the mine and operated it under the name of the Minonk Coal Company. About 300 people were employed and they mined about 450 tons of coal a day. Mr. Sutton operated the mine until 1951, when it was closed for good. This ended the era of coal mining in Minonk.
 
1885 Annual Coal Report 3
The Chicago and Minonk Coal Co.
      This shaft is 550 feet deep, located at Minonk, on the lines of the I. C. R. R. and the C, P. & S. W. R. R., and worked by long-wall. The coal face is nearly three-fourths of a mile from the bottom of the shaft. Here are fine facilities for rope haulage, and it is contemplated putting a rope in to haul from two different sections. The condition of this mine below was good, though the ventilating current, produced by a twelve-foot fan, was hardly up to the legal standard. A subsequent visit found it much improved, from having had a number of openings left for air to circulate through, instead of one, as formerly, and the distance has been shortened. The cleaning and enlargement of the air-courses leading to the upcast, when finished, will give good results for the labor and money expended. The escapement shaft at this mine is located 100 yards from the hoisting shaft, but is so situated with frame buildings adjoining, in connection with tile and brick manufacture, that it would be greatly endangered in the event of fire. I recommended a fire-proof building being erected around the escapement shaft. A brick boiler house is also being constructed. The erection of these two buildings, with the fire pumps, hose-piping, and the abundant supply of water at command, will reduce the danger from fire at the mine to a minimum. There were eleven boilers generating steam for the mine and for the brick and tile works. These have now been reduced to eight, and tubular boilers with 39 tubes each have been substituted for the two Hue boilers.
Miner T. Ames, Proprietor and Superintendent.
D. McDonald, Mine Manager.
 
1894 Annual Coal Report 6
Fires
      December 21, 1893, a fire started in the haulage engine room of the Chicago & Minonk Coal Co.'s mine, Minonk, Woodford county, at the bottom of the shaft; the fire originated from the overturning by the engineer, of a can of oil on to a torch, the fire was communicated to the timbers and burned them out for a distance of 60 feet toward the hoisting shaft: then spread to the air-shaft about 300 feet east of the hoisting shaft: before the fire could be overcome, it burned the ventilating fan, causing a heavy loss to the company, operations were suspended for six weeks.
 
1900 Annual Coal Report 12
Prospective Mines.
      The Minonk Coal Mining and Tile Works, at Minonk, is engaged in sinking a new hoisting shaft about three-quarters of a mile north of their old mine, on the Illinois Central railroad. This mine is unique in one respect, inasmuch as it is being sunk down on the old workings of the other mine, and will, therefore, have no shaft pillar at all. It will go down near the face of the workings in the other shaft, the object of which is two-fold; first, so as to avoid any extra cost in opening up the new mine, and the other is to improve the ventilation of the old mine, as they will be connected as soon as the new one is completed.
 
1918 Annual Coal Report 17
Minonk Coal Co. has made the following improvements:
      A new boiler room 48 feet by 64 feet, height 20 feet, made of cement and brick, which is absolutely fire proof; one brick chimney 115 feet high, which is 20 feet higher than the tipple of the mine and it matters not which way the wind blows, no sparks from this chimney will light upon any frame building and cause a fire; four new boilers 72 inches by 18 feet with 70: 4-inch tubes inserted, supposed to carry 150 pounds pressure. The company has also built a brick wash house 20 feet by 36 feet with cement floor and roof, made a reservoir 100 feet wide, 200 feet long and 15 feet deep for water supply, installed new pump at bottom of the mine for pumping of water from the bottom of air shaft and main shaft to the surface, put in new guides and new cages.

Roanoke Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :
   Woodford County - Township 27 North, Range 1 West, Section 14, NE SW SW
Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 480 feet with an average coal seam of 2½ feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Roanoke Coal Mine No. 1   Peter Belsley   1881 -1883
Roanoke Coal Mine No. 1   Roanoke Coal & Mining Company   1883 -1907
Roanoke Coal Mine No. 1   Roanoke Coal Company   1907 -1924
Roanoke Coal Mine No. 1   J. T. Barron   1924 -1928
Roanoke Coal Mine No. 1   Roanoke Coal & Tile Company   1929 -1938
Roanoke Coal Mine   Roanoke Coal Company   1939 -1940
[Source - No. 1, Index 611]
The last production was reported in 1940.
 
Extract from The Woodford County History 2
Roanoke Township
Industry
      The second coal mine in the county was sunk in Roanoke in 1881. A company, with Isaac Snyder, Peter Kennell and Peter Belsley, as chief investors, was formed and the shaft was sunk in the east part of town to a depth of 480 feet. They found a very good vein of coal at this depth, although two other veins had been found which did not promise as rich a return. In 1889, men who worked the mine were of many nationalities -- Scotch, English, German, Irish, and a few French and Italians. During the next four years many more French and Italians came to work.
      The property was sold to the Roanoke Mining Co. in 1889. By 1910 it was owned and operated by the Duggan Bros. At this time it was producing about 500 tons of coal per da\y and employed approximately 300 men. After the hard road was built much coal was trucked to Peoria. Roanoke's prosperity more or less depended on the mine until February 1940 when it closed. The large pile of clay at the mine, known as Mt. Jumbo, has been one of Roanoke's landmarks.
 
1885 Annual Coal Report 3
The Roanoke Mining Co.
      This company has a shaft 480 feet deep, situated at Roanoke, on the C, P. & S. W. R. R., and worked by long-wall. The ventilation in this mine has been very defective, but will be good now that the escapement shaft is completed, with a ten-foot Brazil fan in operation at the top.
Joseph Belsley, Superintendent.
John Grey, Mine Manager.
 
1929 Annual Coal Report 20
Change of Name -- J. T. Baron Company to Roanoke Coal & Tile Company.

June 29, 1906
Accident at Roanoke Coal & Mining Company's Mine
14
June 29, 1906. August Muesner, miner, aged 30 years, married; Joe Dewasme, miner, aged 36 years, married; Cameo Fancon, miner, aged 35 years, married, and Andrew Mitchell, boss driver, aged 31 years, married, were killed by the breaking of a scaffold about seventy-five feet from the top of the hoisting shaft of the Roanoke Coal & Mining Co.'s mine, Roanoke, Woodford county.
 
      The result of this accident is that four wives are made widows and eight children are left fatherless.
 
      Andrew Mitchell, who was the mule boss, and the other men, all practical miners, were working on the night shift as sinkers, enlarging the hoisting shaft; the enlargement of the shaft had been completed. At the time of the accident they were engaged straightening several of the timbers which had slipped from their places; to enable the men to do this work they had erected two scaffolds, about 10 to 15 feet apart, on the opposite side of the shaft from that in which the cage was used, they were using only one cage. About 9:00 o'clock p. m. Mitchell, Fancon and Muesner came up on a car of dirt, which they had loaded on the cage, leaving Dewasme on the scaffold; the purpose of the upper scaffold and platform was to prevent falling material injuring the men while at work on the lower platform.
 
      At 9:10 p. m. the regular night shift of the mine got on the cage and were lowered a distance of seven feet, when the three sinkers named got on the top of the cage (the top of the cage being flat) and were lowered down the shaft to their work. The engineer had received no instructions to stop at either of the scaffolds or platforms; he, however, slowed up as the cage approached the first platform, this platform was all right when the cage passed, as Patrick Brennan the mine examiner, who was on the cage, spoke to Dewasme, who had been left on the platform to work while the three had gone up to unload the car of dirt upon which they had been conveyed on the cage to the top of the shaft. The cage went down the shaft until it was about seventy feet below the lower platform or scaffold, when the engineer received a signal of "one bell' to stop the cage, which he did; a few moments after stopping he received the signal of "two bells" and lowered the cage to the bottom. While the cage was stopped, about seventy feet below where the men had been working, the men on the cage heard something fall down the shaft on the opposite side, but did not know what it was; they called up to the sinkers but received no answer. On reaching the bottom the men who had gone down on the cage went to the sump at the bottom of the shaft to investigate and they made the statement that they found nothing to indicate that anything out of the ordinary had taken place, and they went to their work in different parts of the mine.
 
      The next shift of sinkers were to report for work at 11:00 p. m. Charles Priller, one of the men on this shift, went to the shaft at 10:40 p. m. and was informed by the engineer that the cage had been at the lower landing since about 9:40 p. m. Four workmen, named Priller, Adhern, Fourit and Fancon, got on the cage at the lower landing and went down the shaft to the first scaffold or platform, and found it gone; they were then lowered to the place where the second or lower scaffold had been and found only two boards of it remaining. They were then lowered to the bottom of the shaft, where they met the night foreman, Alphonse Dourlain, and inquired of him where the sinkers were, and he said he did not know. Michael Proctor, the mine manager, was sent for and search for the bodies was made. The bodies of the four men were found in the sump, at the bottom of the shaft, which was sixteen feet deep and filled with water. After making an examination of the shaft and the places where the scaffolds had been, I am of the opinion that the upper scaffolding had become weakened by the slipping of the timbers on which it was built, and that when the three men jumped from the top of the cage, while the cage was in motion, to the platform, the momentum of the three, with their combined weight and that of Dewasme, who was on this scaffold, was more than it could bear, and that it gave way, carrying with it the men and the lower platform to the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 420 feet. It is evident that the falling timber and men reached the bottom of the shaft before the cage, and that, when the men on the cage called up to the sinkers at the time the cage stopped about seventy-five feet below the platform, they were lying lifeless in the sum at the bottom of the shaft; also that what the men on the cage heard falling was the noise made by the four men as they fell to the bottom of the shaft.
 

Woodford County, Illinois
Coal Mines Fatalities
BARTROSHITAS
February 18, 18905, Adam Bartroshitas, of Minonk, aged 35 years, single, was severely injured by a falling rock at the face of his room when digging coal in the mine owned by the Coal Co. at Minonk. He died from the effect of his injury the second day after the accident.
 
BONDER
September 26, 191316, Peter Bonder, of Minonk, miner, aged 31 years, married, was killed by a fall of rock in the Minonk Coal Company's mine, Minonk, Woodford County. He leaves a widow and three children.
 
DEWASME
June 29, 190614. Joe Dewasme, of Roanoke, miner, aged 36 years, married, was killed by the breaking of a scaffold about seventy-five feet from the top of the hoisting shaft of the Roanoke Coal & Mining Co.'s mine, Roanoke, Woodford county. He leaves a widow and three children
See :June 29, 1906 Accident
 
DINGUEL
May 13. 190513, Eli Dinguel, of Roanoke, miner, aged 34 years, single, in the employ of the Roanoke Coal & Mining Co.. Roanoke, Woodford county, was instantly killed by falling rock and timber about 8:00 p. m.
 
FANCON
June 29, 190614. Cameo Fancon, of Roanoke, miner, aged 35 years, married, was killed by the breaking of a scaffold about seventy-five feet from the top of the hoisting shaft of the Roanoke Coal & Mining Co.'s mine, Roanoke, Woodford county. He leaves a widow and two children.
See :June 29, 1906 Accident
 
GARRETT
January 25, 18978, Harry Garrett, of Minonk, an engineer, aged 25 years, single, was killed instantly by being struck on the head by the crank of a stationary engine at the Chicago & Minonk Coal and Tile Company's mine, at Minonk, Woodford county. The engine was used for hauling rock up the elevated rock dump. The deceased was working around it while it was in motion, and is supposed to have fallen in such a manner that his head went just under the revolving crank; every revolution thereof struck his head, crushing it.
 
GERESEVERAK
October 30, 190413, Mike Gereseverak, of Minonk, driver, aged 31 years, married, employed in the Minonk Coal Co"s mine, Minonk. Woodford county, was fatally injured by being crushed between loaded pit cars. He died three days afterwards, leaving a widow and three children.
 
HAMMEL
February 22, 18957, William Hammel, of Minonk, aged 40, married, employed by the Chicago & Minonk Coal and Tile Company in their mine, at Minonk, cleaning the track on night shift. On the morning of February 22, 1895, he had cleared a fall of rock in the third west entry, and at 4 a. m. was pushing a pit-car up hill to the sixth east. On coming near the sixth east entry, he met the night shift driver coming down the hill with a mule and a trip of cars, loaded with rock; Hammel stood on the track and waved his light to stop the driver, but owing to it being down hill he was unable to do so, and the mule and trip ran on to him with his empty car, turning the car across the track, crushed him between the car and the pillar, injuring him internally and killing the mule. It was thought at the time of the accident that he would recover, but he died three months after the accident, May 18, 1895. In connection with this, I found at 28 feet from where he was injured, a man-hole, in which he could have gone instead of trying to stop the trip. Orders had been given him by the pit-boss not to take cars up this hill, but he thought he could not get a car in the sixth east to work with. He left a widow.
 
KETCHMARK
April 24, 189911, Andrew Ketchmark, of Minonk, a miner, aged 47 years, leaves a widow and nine children, was killed instantly by being caught under a heavy fall of roof, at the face of his working room in the Minonk Coal Company's mine, located at Minonk, Woodford county. Deceased had fired a blast in the brushing Saturday evening previous. The powder had struck a "smooth", and spread along the face, on the right hand side of the room; when he came to work on Monday morning he neglected to secure properly the powder shaken roof, there was only one prop under it; shortly after he commenced work the weight of the roof seemed to have swung the prop, and the mass fell, crushing deceased under it.
 
LISIESICKI
On April 29, 1896, at Chicago & Minonk Coal & Tile Co.'s mine, at Minonk, Woodford county, George Lisiesicki, of Minonk, a Polish miner, aged 43, married, was killed by a fall of rock in his room. He had been working at the lower end of his room, and came to the road head to mine a little, while his "buddy" finished loading a car, preparatory to going home, when a piece of rock fell without warning, killing him instantly. The rock weighed about 2,500 pounds. It was exposed on two sides by "slips" running into each other at right angles. Deceased leaves a widow and three children, all dependent.
 
MEHELIC
March 13, 191918, Frank Mehelic, of Rutland, miner, age 29 years, single, was killed in Minonk Coal Company's mine, Minonk, by a fall of rock.
 
MISHOWAK
November 7, 189912. Joseph Miskowak, of Minonk, aged 28 years, single, was killed by a fall of rock in the third north entry of the 10th, west, on November 7, 1899. Deceased had just been loading a car of coal, and when stooped over getting a shovelful of coal, a piece of rock in the brushing gave way, falling on him in such a manner as to break his neck. The accident occurred in the mine of the Minonk Coal and Tile Works, at Minonk.
 
MITCHELL
June 29, 190614. Andrew Mitchell, of Roanoke, boss driver, aged 31 years, married, was killed by the breaking of a scaffold about seventy-five feet from the top of the hoisting shaft of the Roanoke Coal & Mining Co.'s mine, Roanoke, Woodford county. He leaves a widow and one child.
See :June 29, 1906 Accident
 
MUESNER
June 29, 190614. August Muesner, of Roanoke, miner, aged 30 years, married, was killed by the breaking of a scaffold about seventy-five feet from the top of the hoisting shaft of the Roanoke Coal & Mining Co.'s mine, Roanoke, Woodford county. He leaves a widow and two children.
See :June 29, 1906 Accident
 
OLIVER
August 30, 18936, William Oliver, of Minonk, miner, aged 59 years, married, employed by the Chicago and Minonk Coal & Tile Company at Minonk, Woodford county. The deceased was taking down coal when a part of the roof, which had become loose from the effects of a shot he had fired some time previous, fell and killed him instantly. He left a widow and four children.
 
PATRULIS
December 2, 191818, Joseph Patrulis, of Minonk, miner, age 45 years, single, died from injuries received by a fall of rock on November 11, 1918, in Minonk Coal Company's mine, Minonk.
 
PRELLER
October 14, 189710, Charles Preller, of Roanoke, a miner, aged 53 years, married, leaves a widow and two children, had his leg broken by a fall of coal in the Roanoke mine, located at Roanoke, in Woodford county, and died from the effects thereof the following day. Deceased was at work in his room and in the act of taking down a piece of loose coal, when it came away suddenly and caught his leg, breaking it just above the ankle. There was nothing in this accident that would lead to the belief that it would terminate fatally; but he never regained consciousness after the drug was administered, as is usual in such cases, before reducing the fracture.
 
REGIS
January 24, 190513, Mathew Regis, of Roanoke, miner, aged 40 years, married, employed in the mine of the Roanoke Coal Mining Co.. Roanoke. Woodford county, was instantly killed by falling coal. His head was caught between the coal and a prop. He leaves a widow and two children.
 
RILEY
On December 28, 18864, John Riley, aged 30 years, married and having four children, employed by the Chicago and Minonk Coal and Coke Company as a miner, was killed by falling rock. The deceased and his partner were working on the night shift in an entry. About 3 A. M., a piece of rock weighing about one ton partly fell on him. He had discovered a slip in the roof and had just put a prop under the bad rock, but the prop was under the light side of the rock which possibly made the rock come down sooner than it otherwise would. His partner brought him out to the bottom where he obtained assistants to take him home, but he expired in an hour after his arrival there.
 
RINALDO
March 20, 191215, Joseph Rinaldo, of Roanoke, miner, aged 49 years, married, working in the Roanoke Coal Co.'s mine, Roanoke, Woodford County, was seriously injured by a fall of coal at his working place and died March 22. He leaves a widow and three children.
 
SALVATORE
January 17, 192819, Carlo Salvatore, of Toluca, miner, age 55 years, married, died from injuries received three days earlier, when caught by falling rock, in W. G. Sutton Coal Company's mine. He leaves a widow.
 
SCHMIDT
January 17, 189810. On December 6, 1897, Michael Schmidt, of Minonk, a miner, aged 28 years, single, was severely crushed by a fall of roof at the face of his working place in the Minonk mine, located at Minonk, in Woodford county, and died from the injuries received in a hospital at Bloomington, January 17, 1898. At the time of the accident deceased was in the act of wedging down coal at the face of his room. When the coal fell it displaced a number of props and let down about 1,500 pounds of roof, part of which fell on deceased, crushing him severely. He died 42 days after the accident.
 
SYRK
November 20, 189710, Peter Syrk, of Minonk, a miner, aged 42 years, married, leaves a widow and three children, was severely crushed by a fall of roof at the face of his working place in Minonk mine, located at Minonk, in Woodford county, and died from the injuries received two days after the accident. Deceased was at work in his working: place, and knew that the over-hanging rock was in a dangerous condition. He was about to put up additional props to secure it, when it came down suddenly with the above result.
 
VOISIN
January 16, 191416, Adolph Voisin, of Roanoke, miner, aged 62 years, married, was killed by falling coal in the Roanoke Coal Company's mine, Roanoke, Woodford County. He leaves a widow.
 

Woodford County, Illinois
Non-Fatal Casualties

July 1, 1923 - June 30, 1924 & July 1, 1925 - December 31, 1925
BESETTO, Peter age 43 years, Married with 1 child; 2 dependents, of Roanoake
1 Dec 1923 - Back injured, lifting - Time lost - 30 days
 
BUSSONE, Joe age 40 years, Miner, employed by J. T. Barron
25 Oct 1925 - Toe broken, falling slate - Time lost - 55 days
 
FERRS, Barney age 69 years, Single, of Roanoake
28 Sep 1923 - Back injured, lifting - Time lost - 50 days
 
FLYNN, James age 36 years, Miner, employed by W. G. Sutton
15 Oct 1925 - Leg broken, falling rock - Time lost - 30 days
 
GREGWICH, John age 59 years, Miner, employed by W. G. Sutton
18 Aug 1925 - Leg broken, falling rock - Time lost - 44 days
 
LENVISH, Joseph age 50 years, Married with 1 child; 2 dependents, of Roanoake
6 Feb 1924 - Toe broken, falling rock - Time lost - 40 days
 
MALINSKI, Martin age 54 years, Miner, employed by W. G. Sutton
22 Aug 1925 - Finger mashed, lifting rock - Time lost - 39 days
 
MARTENO, Axion age 42 years, Married with 4 children; 5 dependents, of Roanoake
5 Apr 1924 - Toe broken, falling coal - Time lost - 40 days
 
MILICJEWSKI, Joe age 28 years, Married with 3 children; 5 dependents, of Minonk
3 Dec 1923 - Finger broken, spragging car - Time lost - 30 days
 
NENZARD, Anton age 41 years, Married with 5 children; 6 dependents, of Roanoake
13 Mar 1924 - Collarbone broken, falling coal - Time lost - 60 days
 
OLANAK, John age 50 years, Married with 4 children; 1 dependent, of Minonk
7 Aug 1923 - Leg broken, falling rock - Time lost - 60 days
 
PERALLA, Dom. age 21 years, Single, of Roanoake
5 Mar 1924 - Head injured, falling rock - Time lost - 80 days
 
RANALAUS, Jule age 42 years, Married with 1 dependent, of Roanoake
28 Dec 1923 - Back injured, lifting - Time lost - 50 days
 
RENALDO, John age 30 years, Married with 3 children; 4 dependents, of Roanoake
1 May 1924 - Back injured, lifting - Time lost - 30 days
 
SCHLICTUS, Charles age 35 years, Single, of Minonk
1 Feb 1924 - Knee injured, falling coal - Time lost - 30 days
 
SHREDNAIRA, Mat age 51 years, Married with 3 children; 4 dependents, of Minonk
3 Mar 1924 - Foot injured, falling coal - Time lost - 30 days
 

 
Sources :
 
1 Coal Mines in Illinois, Woodford County
                Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL. 61820

2 The Woodford County History; Woodford County Board of Supervisors, 1968;
                Compiled by the Woodford County Sesquicentennial History Committee;
                Mrs. Kenneth Smith, Chairwoman; Edited by Mr. William Yates;
                Published in conjunction with the Sesquicentennial Celebration of the State of Illinois 1818-1968,
                Woodford County, Illinois

3 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1885 -- A Supplemental Report; State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Reports of Mine Inspectors; For the Year Ended July1, 1885
                Springfield, ILL; H. W. Roker, State Printer and Binder, 1885

4 Statistics of Coal in Illinois, 1887 -- A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1887

5 Sixth Biennial Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of Illinois, 1890
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1891

6 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1894
                Thirteenth Annual Report ;    Springfield, ILL.; Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer, 1895

7 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1895
                Fourteenth Annual Report;    Springfield, ILL.; ED. F. Hartman, State Printer, 1896

8 Fifteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1896
                Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1897

9 Sixteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1897
                Coal in Illinois;    Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1898

10 Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1898
                Coal in Illinois;    Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1899

11 Eighteenth Annual Report Prepared by the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1899
                Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1899

12 Nineteenth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900,
                also the Second Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1900, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1901

13 Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905,
                also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1905, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1906

14 Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906,
                also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1906, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1907

15 Thirty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1912
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1913

16 Thirty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1914
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1914

17 Thirty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1918
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1918

18 Thirty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1919
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1919

19 Forty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1928
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1929

20 Forty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1929
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Journal Printing Co., Springfield, ILL., 1930

 

Coal & Coal Mining in Illinois

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