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Publications, Newspapers about Illinois Coal Mines

 
Peabody People 1
Edited and Reported by and for Peabody Coal Company Employees and Their Families
Published by Peabody Coal Company, 231 LaSalle Street, Chicago 4, Ill.
from Page 2 :
"Copyright 1950 by Peabody Coal Company. Permission to reprint material in this issue is granted, provided credit is given."
Six pages of August 1950 issue are available
page 1 of Aug 1950 Peabody people
 
Page 1
page 2 of Aug 1950 Peabody people
Page 2
page 25 of Aug 1950 Peabody people
Page 25
page 26 of Aug 1950 Peabody people
Page 26
page 29 of Aug 1950 Peabody people
Page 29
page 30 of Aug 1950 Peabody people
Page 30
Fish cartoon by Toots Boyett In Memory
 
of
 
Charles "Toots" Boyett

 
newspaper top photo

Vol. 1 No.2             Edited and Reported by and for Peabody Coal Company Employees and Their Families             August, 1950
What They Said
About First
Issue of Paper
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Boyett Cartoon Wins First
Prize in Vacation Contest
      Many favorable comments have been received about the first issue of Peabody People. In addition to Peabody employees who wrote in to express their opinions, their have been letters from many others whom the paper was sent.
      Quotations from some of the letters are printed below :
      "It is the best publication I ever saw
Governor Liked It
newspaper phot of Gov. Stevenson

      Governor Stevenson said "Peabody People" was one of the most interesting and attractive publication of its kind he ever saw. See his letter on Page 4.
to bring the people closer to the company they work for. I am proud I had a hand in naming it and I am sure proud that I work for the Peabody Coal Company.
      "We are all glad that the magazine is just what you said it would be -- about the Peabody Coal Company and the people who work for it. I think it is just that."
      From a letter to Mr. Peabody from Warren Bacon, Mine 57
(Continued on Page 4))
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Any Employee Can
Get Annual Report

      In the recent opinion poll of Peabody employees, the question was asked : "Did you ever see a company financial statement?" Of the 195 who answered this question, 158 said they never had seen one.
      illegible
they would like to see the statement, 176 said they would. Only twelve were not interested.
      In answer to what seems to be an overwhelming desire on the part of employees to be better informed than they have been about the company's operations and finances, the financial statement for the year ended April 30, 1950 is shown on page 21. This exactly as it ap-
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Are You Looking?
    The company's television program, "Clifton Utley and the News," is being widely acclaimed. This is a reminder that it can be viewed on WNBQ Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 10:30 o'clock, CDT.

      illegible
Journal and Chicago Journal of Commerce.
      A copy of the annual report may be obtained by any employee by writing to Mr. Peabody at the company's main office in Chicago.
      The report is a 32-page booklet, containing the financial statement, the president's letter to shareholders and employees and other company information.
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Judges Award
$25 to Toots
For His Drawing

Toots Boyett newspaper photo       "Toots" Boyett, top boss at Mine 40 received the unanimous approval of the judges to earn first place in the Peabody People Vacation Contest.
      Entries were very light, possibly because of the short time between the vacation and this edition. Toots' contribution, a cartoon, showing "Peaco," the little miner, on a typical holiday, was very well done and seemed sure to win in any case.
      First place was worth $25 to "Toots," who plans to continue helping Peabody People, by doing a cartoon on the activities of "Peaco," for every issue.
      See the prize-winning cartoon on back page.

Receives Certificate newspapaer photo of Robert Bercher
    Robert W. Bercher, assis- tant auditor, Peabody Coal Company, was among 64 Chicago executives to complete the University of Chicago's sixth Executive Program and to receive certificates at a special ceremony at 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 14, in Leon Mandel Hall. He will receive his Master's Degree in Business Administration.
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Al Barlick Thinks New Company
Paper Is Great Idea
newspapaer photo
      Al Barlick, Peabody miner and National League umpire, shows a copy of first issue of Peabody People to Gil Hodges (left) and Carl Furillo of Brooklyn Dodgers, in visiting team's dugout at Wrigley Field, home of the Cubs in Chicago. It was the first time Al had seen the paper, and he said he thought it was a great idea. during the winter months Al works as a wireman at Mine 59. (See story on Page 5).

 

 
2PEABODY PEOPLEAugust, 1950

PEABODY PEOPLE
Edited and Reported by and for
Peabody Coal Company Employees
and Members of Their Families

 
Published by Peabody Coal Company,
231 LaSalle Street, Chicago 4, Ill.
 
Central Illinois Division--Taylorville. Mines : No. 7, Kincaid; No. 8, Tovey; No. 9, Taylorville; No. 57, Springfield, (closed June 30); No. 59, Springfield; No. 17, Pana; Carter Washing Plant, Kincaid.
 
Southern Illinois Division--Marion. Mines : No. 14, DuQuoin; No. 43, Harrisburg; No. 47, Harrisburg; No. 40, Galatia.
 
Eastern Division--Kenvir, Ky. Mines : No. 70, Ameagle, W. Va.; No. 30, Kenvir, Ky.; No. 31, Kenvir, Ky.
 
      Copyright 1950 by Peabody Coal Company. Permission to reprint material in this issue is granted, provided credit is given.

Vol. 1   No. 2printers symbolAugust 1950

A Message from the President
      In my first message in this column  [illegible]   ago I mentioned that we were well satisfied with the newspaper photo of Mr. Peabody response all of our own people gave to our new magazine The fine reception you gave to our first issue convinced me that this venture is worthwhile and holds promise for the future.
      Many inside the Company and out congratulated us on Vol 1, No. 1. Often, however, they added, "Now, if you can just keep it up to the standard set by your first issue, . . .". We are going to try. We will have the benefit of experience gained as the paper gets older, and we expect it to improve and not die after an initial burst of enthusiasm. We plan to add new features which couldn't be ready for our first issue and continue the best of our original features.
*   *   *
      THE SECOND installment of the results of the opinion poll is printed on another page. This new approach
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to employee-employer relations has attracted considerable attention. I think you will find the box score of your answers interesting. We plan to carry out as soon as possible all sound suggestions and to correct mistakes which you have called to our attention.
      As we work together, we hope to lead the way toward a better understanding of your problems by us and hope that you, too, will be better able to understand some of our problems.
*   *   *
      IN THE FUTURE I hope through the medium of this letter, to tell you from time to time more of our Company's long-range plans. Again, I request any of you to write directly to me if you have any comments, suggestions or criticisms which might improve our common lot. I also welcome any questions. I shall attempt to answer them personally, reprinting the questions and answers in this paper if they are of general Company interest. I assure you that I am interested in the individual problems of each of you. Address me at our Company's Main Office, 231 South LaSalle Street, Chicago 4, Illinois.
            [signature]
                        President
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letterhead
 
      Figures just presented to me giving the number of fatal and non-fatal accidents in the coal mines of America from 1940 through 1949, a ten-year period, are so shocking that I feel compelled to appeal to the coal operators and our coal miners to make every person in the coal industry "SAFETY CONSCIOUS."
 
      I realize the cooperation and personal effort of both the operator and miner to eliminate accidents is commendable, but with a total of approximately 600,000 coal miners killed and injured during the last decade, greater effort must be put forth by all to halt this menace to life and limb in the coal pits.
 
      The unofficial figures that have been compiled show 11,902 killed and 587,363 injured during this period. No one can doubt after looking at these figures that coal mining is indeed a very hazardous industry, and when you realize the only reason these figures were not greater was because the coal miner was only employed on an average of a little better than half time. His average for the ten years was around 197 days a year and this was considerably higher than previous decades.
 
      My purpose in presenting these figures is to shock the membership and operators into a relentless campaign for SAFETY.
 
      If these figures have not jarred you out of your complacency, permit me to point out that every day the mines work, approximately six are killed and 300 injured.
 
      Unless you constantly THINK of SAFETY you may be one of the six or 300.
Hoard Patriotically
*   *   *
An Editorial from The
Chicago Daily News
July 24, 1950

      There is one thing you can hoard with a clear conscience.
      This is coal.
      If you use this kind of fuel in your business or home, load up now.
      It is good business any year to fill your coal bin in summer. The price is relatively low. Deliveries are easy, prompt and certain.
      In recent years big strikes in the coal industry have stressed the importance of storing coal when you can get it.
      It is not certain, by any means, that pure patriotism would prevent another coal strike if war continues. But even if there is no strike, railroad car shortages could restrict deliveries before the winter is over.
      Right now there is plenty of coal. It is prudent, economical, and patriotic to buy it and store it on the site where it will be used.
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Close Mine 57

      Mine 57 was closed permanently on June 30. It had been in continuous production since 1886, and was worked out.
      The 3,000 tons per day previously supplied by this mine will come from the company's new Mine 17 at Pana, Ill., which shortly will reach full production of 9,000 tons per day.
      A large percentage of the employees at Mine 57 have been transferred and re-employed at other mines.
Under the retirement plan for administrative and supervisory employees, $441,685 was set aside by the Peabody Coal Company and producing subsidiaries for the year 1950, ended April 30. These employees are not eligible for the union welfare plan benefits under the collective bargaining agreement. During the same period $1,846,774 was paid into the UMWWA welfare fund.


 
August, 1950PEABODY PEOPLE25

Cutting Machine Opens Old
Oil Test Hole at Mine 43
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How Oil Test Hole Was Sealed Off
Sealed Mine tunnel
      The seal as seen from the mine level, is a blank cement wall. The posts were used to prevent the floor and ceiling from cracking while the pressurized cement was being circulated. The floor of the mine was first covered with two layers of oak planks. The posts were set on this foundation. Cement, circulated through the dill hole, covered the wood planks and acted to strengthen the flooring.
Pressurized Cement Tanker
      This is the equipment used by Haliburton Co. in constructing the seal. On the left stands a bulk cement convoy, used to transport large quantities of dry cement. On the right is the pimp truck which mixes and pumps the cement to the desired depth. The crew are, left to right: Charles smith, bulk cement driver; Robert Chambliss, pup truck driver (on truck); and Rex Storm, cementer.
circulated back into mine and around the damaged area. This cement when allowed to harden |
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proved an efficient seal and no further leakage of gas or water has been noted.
      A cutting machine at Mine 43 accidentally ran into an old abandoned oil test hole, on May 31, developing a considerable amount of gas and water. The resulting operation necessary to seal off this hole proved both interesting and difficult.
      A temporary seal of rope oakum and concrete was first constructed around the hole at mine level, but this failed to hold. Gas and water continued to enter the mine. It
Oil Test Hole diagram
      Diagram shows a cross-section of the oil test hole and points out the different phases of the sealing operations.
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was then decided to work from the surface level, sealing the hole by using cement under pressure, a process developed by Haliburton Co., of Salem, Illinois.
*   *   *
      TO DO THIS it was necessary first to clear the old hole casing to about 61 feet below the coal level. A concrete plug was then built at the bottom of the cleared section of casing. A 6-inch pipe was strung down the hole to within 5 feet of the plug and cement was poured through the pipe.
      The cement circulated down the pipe and up within the 12-inch oil hole casing, until returning to the surface. This was allowed to sit several days, forming a solid concrete pillar between pipe and casing, except for the 6-inch pipe which was kept clear by forcing a temporary plug down to within a few feet of its end and in back of the fresh cement. This plug later was drilled out and a special gun, using the principle of the bazooka, was lowered into the 6-inch pipe and utilized in shooting ten holes in the 12-inch casing and surrounding strata.
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Ground Was Hard

      "Uncle Ed" Forston, blacksmith at Mine 43,is a real oldtimer and beloved by all who know him. He
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has worked for Peabody 34 years.
      The boys at the mine have many stories about "Uncle Ed" and he just good-naturedly smiles and passes them off.
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      They tell of the time he arrived in Marion, Illinois, fresh from a farm near Paducah, Ky. The city of Marion had just finished an asphalt street. "Uncle Ed, " scraping his feet on the hard surface, remarked, "Well, I don't blame them for building a town here. The ground's too darn hard to plow, anyhow."
      "Uncle Ed" must have liked it in Marion, though, because he's lived there ever since. He is 65 years old and resides with his wife, Frannie. They have three grown children, all married.

Summers Married
      Bill Summers and Patsy Ann Schockley, both of Benton, Ill., were married June 30 at Trinity Methodist Church, West Frankfort. Their honeymoon, July 1 to 10, was spent driving through Tennessee, Kentucky and North Carolina.
      Bill is a yardman at Mine 43.
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working with his father, Smith Summers, who is hoisting engineer.
      Best man was Lyle Beard, tracklayer at the mine.


Looks Happy
      Joe Kaytor, hopper control man, Mine 43, rocks back on his chair, as if to say"Ain't this sumpin?"
 
newspaper photo of Joe Kaytor
newspaper photo of Ed Forston

 
26PEABODY PEOPLEAugust, 1950

Peabody Mine No.7, Kincaid, IL.
MINE 7 -- KINCAID
Opened in 1912   Total tons produced, 39,921,625.
 Shaft mine.Depth 346 feet.
 Distance mined from bottom, 4 miles.
Average daily production, 9,500 tons.Employees -- 892.
Mine Superintendent, L. StarksMine Manager, J. M. Carney
CENTRAL ILLINOIS DIVISION
33 Years at Mine 7; He Has
Made Only One Trip Below

newspaper photo of Pete Haines       HIS FAVORITE PASTIME. Peter Haines, who has worked at Mine 7 for 33 years and who has been below only once in that time, enjoys being seranaded by his twin granddaughters, Swynda Sue and Lynda Lue, and his grandson, David. Another favorite pastime is reminicising about the days when, as a farm in west Virginia, he lived in the log cabin shown in the inset.
*   *   *
      To have worked at one coal mine for 33 years is no minor record, but to have been below in that mine only once in 33 years probably sets an altogether new record.
      Holder of this record is Pete Haines, car puller at Mine 7, who also may qualify as the oldest man employed
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      Biggest topic of conversation with Pete, however, are his twin granddaughters, Lynda Lue and Swynda Sue, and his grandson, David, whose father, Bryant Haines, is an electrician at Mine 9.
      Pete's favorite pastime is having the girls and their
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How To Win Friends
      Robert Heiple, motorman at Mine 7, has an effective recipe for winning friends and influencing people. It follows: Drive to a certain place on the Mississippi river; fish until you've caught your limit. Return home, fry the fish and bring as much as you can to the mine in the bottom of your lunch bucket.
Robert Heiple in boat with fish

Vernetti Marries
nbsp;     Robert Vernetti, electrcian and secretary of Mine 7 United Mine Workers local, was married to Beulah Herron recently at Clayton, Mo.
      Attending the wedding were Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Motteshaw and family of Kincaid. Mr Mottershaw is a motorman at Mine 7.
      The bride wa attired in a beige street length dress with yellow accessories and the couple honeymooned in Clayton for a week.

"We Wuz Robbed"
Al Dodds newspaper photo
      "We was robbed," is the opinion of Al Dodds, trip rider, Mine 7, and Julius Scopal, the mine's softball coach.
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Trip Rider Pitches for
Danville Dodgers

      Kenneth "Bud" Fustin, Mine 7 trip rider, now on leave of absence, recently one his fourth game in seven starts for the Danville Dodgers, of the Three Eye league.
      A lover of baseball newspaper photo of Bud Fustin since he was in diapers, according to his father, Sam Fustin, Mine 8 motorman. Bud is in his second season with the Danville club and shows promise of climbing into the major leagues.
      At 23, Bud is married and has a 20-month old daughter, Carol Lynn. He is a graduate of Taylorville high school and was a star on the Taylorville Veterans' ball team until he joined the Dodgers. His family resides in Kincaid.

Safe Or Out?Safe or Out?
      Frank Tomazik, who mines coal at Mine 7 in the daytime, enjoys umpiring at night. Here he is working a game in the State VFW junior softball tournament sponsored by Taylorville post.

RE-ELECTED TO COMMITTEE
      John Burke, veteran driller, has been re-elected mine committeeman by members of the United Mine workers at Mine 7. This is his fourth consecutive term as committeeman.
by Peabody Coal Company. He is 83 years of age.
      As active as many a younger man, Pete enjoys joking about his age and reminisicing about his days in West Virginia where, as a farmer, he lived in a log cabin.
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brother seranade him with their accordians.
      When is Pete going to retire? "Well, sir." he says, "I'm not right sure bout that. don't feel too young any more, but I sure don't feel so old."
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One Day's Catch, He Says
One Day's Catch
      William Holstins, trip rider at Mine 7, caught these blue channel cat in one dya, on the Little Wabash river, he said. But it happened last year, and maybe he's dreaming.

 
August, 1950PEABODY PEOPLE29

Dryer Reclaims 400 Tons
Of Dust Per Day at Mine 47

 
      Constructed in February, 1949, the coal dryer at Mine 47 still is unique in the coal industry.
      Its great value lies in reclaiming otherwise useless coal sludge, a mixture of coal dust and moisture, which accumualtes in great quanity
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around mines. The dryer performs a dehydrating operation, heat being used to remove the moisture from the sludge.
      The result is dried dust which can be used practically in industrial furnaces. The plant reclaimes about 400 tons of dust each day.

 
 
sludge truck at Mine 47

      James Payton, truck driver, dumps a load of coal sludge onto the feed conveyor which carries the sludge into the dryer.
 
 
 Arthur Thompson loading dryer

      The dryer uses its own product for heat, some of the prepared dust being run back into the furnace. Here Arthur Thompson, dryer operator, looks to see if furnace is heating properly.
 
 
Arthur Patterson at coal car

      Robert Patterson, dryer helper, stands by as the finished product is loaded into a coal car.
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Charles Boyett holding finished product of dryer

      Charles Boyett, foreman of dryer, shows the finished product. In his hand he holds a handful of sludge and in the shovel a pile of dried coal dust.
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There's Good Fishing
Around Du Quoin
By Loren Polly
      If you are employed at Mine 14 or live near Du Quoin you are in the middle of the best blue gill, croppie and bass fishing in the state. If this seems to be a broad statement, just look at these facts.
      In Perry county alone there are about 150 lakes, including the many strip mine cuts. Each of these lakes has been well stocked with fish from the state hatcheries.
      In these lakes, especially the older ones, there is an abundance of pan fish seldom found anywhere else. The lake at Mine 14 is said bu many to be the best blue gill lake in teh state of Illinois.
      Recently Lyle Ramsey, top hand, Mine 14, caught 41 large blue gill in about an hour and a half. Naturally this isn't a record, but it will give you an idea of how they

Construction of a modern air coal cleaning plant at Mine 70, Ameagle, W. Va., was completed in April.

bite here. It's a poor day when you can't take a can of worms and a cane pole and with a little effort come home with a good string of fish.
*   *   *
      A MAN AND his wife, using fly rods here, and "popper" baits, caught 82 nice croppie one day in June. Their home was in St. Louis and the man remarked that he had put in his finest day of fishing in ten years.
      The remarkable thing about this lake is the fact that I have fished there for about 15 years and in that time there must have been caught at least 50 tons of fish. There has never been any indication of the fish population's decreasing. I believe, if anything, they have increased.
*   *   *
      JUST NORTHWEST of Du Quoin lies Cherry Lake. This lake got its name many years ago from the countless wild cherry trees that line its shore. The game fish in this beautiful lake are as plentiful as the wild cherries.
      Bass Lake, our city reservoir in Du Quoin, was always a good spot for fishing until a few years ago when a great many fish died, due to an overdose of chlorine. The bigger fish seemed to have lived through this, however, and once again the lake is giving up good-sized fish. Lunkers from six to ten pounds have been hooked and boated recently.
      Our fairground lakes and strip cuts have been giving up some honey catches. Tommy Woolten, the Perry county conservation agent, landed a two-pound six ounce blue gill from one of these strips.
*   *   *
      LOCATED a few miles north of
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newspaper phot of Loren Polley, with his dog
      "GOOD DOG." Loren Polley, truck driver, Mine 14, shows off his prize dog, "Gentleman Jim." Loren always has been interested in animals and works in his spare time as assistant to the game conservation warden in Southern Illinois.

Pinckneyville, Illinois, is that city's resetvoir. Nice catfhes are being reported from there also. For those who like catfish, here is the lake for you. From early spring until mid-July you can really nail them. On a cold windy day in March, "Doc" O'Keefe, sheriff, Gene Ernst, clerk, Mine 14, and I brought home 98 "cats" from this lake.
      So, if any of you fellows are having trouble "stinking up the skillet," do as Mae West said, "Come up and see us sometime."

Jack Roper in Debry Car
      Jack Roper, age 13, son of Roy Soper, representative of Goodman Manufacturing Co., is shown abocve in his entry for teh St. Louis city elimination of the national Soap Box Derby. Jack is a Peabody rooter and asked "Toots" Boyett, top boss at Mine 40, to draw a picture of "Peaco" driving a mine motor, as an emblem for the side of his car.

New Shelton Daughter
      Selma and Otto Shelton, are the parents of a 7½-pound baby girl, named Gloria Jeanne, born June 23. The Sheltons live at 310 S. Vicksburg, Marion, Ill. Otto is chief clerk at the Division office in Marion.

Peabody Coal Company is leasing approximately $3,000,000 of the latest mining equipment directly from the manufacturers, more than one-third of which had been installed by April 30.


 
30PEABODY PEOPLEAugust, 1950

Peabody Mine No.58, Taylorville, IL.
MINE 58 -- Taylorville
Acquired in 1916   Total Tons produced, 25,410,912
 Shaft mine.Depth 462 feet.
 Distance mined from bottom, 3 miles.
            Average daily production, 4,400 tons.       Employees -- 494.
Mine Superintendent, Wm. HardyMine Manager, "Jiggs" Edwards
CENTRAL ILLINOIS DIVISION

 
Guy Spindle Is Stock Car Racer

      Any time a man gets a new automobile the subject of most of his conversations quickly reaches the point of, "How fast will she go?" The answer to that question is, "Too fast for your own good," according to Guy Spindle, machinist's helper at Mine 58, and an expert in the spirited sport of stock car racing.
      Guy, despite his 22 years of age, has been racing stock cars in the Illinois-Missouri circuit for two years. Before that he was a mechanic in the pit crew of a midget auto racer.
      "I seldom drive more than 50
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miles an hour on the highway," Guy says, pointing out that he must cover hundreds of miles each week to reach the tracks on which he races. In this he concurs with many other members of the auto racing fraternity, including the famous Wilbur Shaw, three-time winner of the Indianapolis 500-mile race.
x   x   x
      INDICATIVE of the safety consciousness Guy displays both on the track and the road is the fact that in two seasons of racing he has suffered only a black eye, a split
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lip and a sore thumb, an of which the average motorist could pick ip while changing a tire.
      "It seems tro me that mines are a good audience for any safe driving talk," Guy says. "Most of us have to travel a pretty good distance to and from work and generally that calls for plenty of traveling on the highway."
      Asked how he broke into auto racing, Guy just grins and says, "Guess I just got tired of fixing cars and decided I'd better drive for a while."
*   *   *
      THE REAL opportunity to drive came with the introduction of stock car racing in the Midwest. According to Guy, "It doesn't take too much money to put a stock car in a race."
      Another point Guy believes is important to the motorist is proper care of the automobile. Although the the stock cars used for racing usually look as if they are ready to fall apart, they're kept in perfect operating condition, with special emphasis placed on wheel alignment, brakes and other safety factors, he says.

"Scatter-tags" distributed uniformly throughout finished coal by automatic machines to identify Peabody Coal Company products generate dealer confidence and insure against substitute coal.

      PEOPLE OFTEN ask Guy how fast stock cars travel during a race and he generally answers them in terms of portions of a minute, such as seconds and tenths of a second. Fortunately, a slide rule is available and it turns out an answer in the vicinity of 50 to 60 miles per hour for a quarter-mile track.
      Being married affords Guy little time to think seriously about making auto racing a full-time career. He points out that most of the drivers in his circuit are in the "same boat." They race mostly for the sport of it.
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A Fine Catch
 
William Williams wth catch of bass

 
      William Williams, mine examiner at Mine 58, holds a fine catch of bass caught at Kincaid Lake last fall.
 


IS THIS THE RECORD?


      For the sixth consecutive time, Frank Wingo, Mine 58 motorman, has been elected mine committeeman. This is believed to be a record number of terms served by one man in the Midlands area, according to union officials.
 

Results of Survey
Continued from page 23)
      In the year ended April 30, 1950 the company sold 9,175,761 tons and mined 8,171,947 tons.
*   *   *
      QUESTION 30. How many employees own stock in the company?
      There are 2,923 shareholders (as of April 30, 1950) of whom 410 are employees.
*   *   *
      QUESTION 31. Did you ever see a company financial statement?
 Yes. . . . . . . . . . . . 37 
 No. . . . . . . . . . . . 158 
If not, would you like to see one?
 Yes. . . . . . . . . . . . 176 
 No. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 
      (See financial statement on page 21.)
Guy Spindle and stock cars |
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*   *   *
      QUESTION 32. (For older employees.) In your time, what progress or improvements have you seen in mining operations which make mining a more satisfactory work?
      "Shooting with air : new drills ; buggies ; track machines."
      "Keeping mine cleaner. Better ventilation. New drills. Continuous loaders."
      "Lighting improvements ; rock dusting ; safety has been much improved."
      "Safety lamps instead of carbide."
      "Air duct shooting, safety, less fumes."
      "Electric light, hard hat, safety shoe."

 

 
Sources :
 
1 Six pages of August 1950 issue of Peabody People courtesy of Robert C. Boyett
 

 
Coal & Coal Mining in Central Illinois
 
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