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Illinois
Coal & Coal Mining
History & Genealogy

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Madison County, Illinois

Featuring Coal Mining
 
      Madison County is a county located in the central part of the state of Illinois.
            38.83° N, 89.91° W
As of 2006, the population was 265,303.
The county seat is Edwardsville, Illinois,
 
      Madison County was established on September 14, 1812.
It was formed out of Randolph and St. Clair Counties and named for James Madison
 
      Madison County has twenty-four townships:
            Alhambra, Alton, Chouteau, Collinsville, Edwardsville, Fort Russell, Foster, Godfrey, Granite City, Hamel, Helvetia, Jarvis, Leef, Marine, Moro, Nameoki, New Douglas, Olive, Omphghent, Pin Oak, Saline, St. Jacob, Venice, Wood River
 
Coal Mines A - F
 
Coal Mines G - L
 
Coal Mines M - Z
 
Fatalities

 
Non-Fatal Casualties
 

Coal and Madison County, Illinois
Excerpt from Centennial History1912
      ". . . Land was bought and shafts sunk on the hills, later on, by Thomas Dunford and James Mitchell; also shafts were sunk in what was called Greenwood, or Buck Inn, by John Applewhite, Thomas Hall, John Rutledge and others. These mines were the first of any extent in the county and were known as Coal Branch. . ."
 
Sandi's Research2010
      "Coal Branch was named for the mines and the creek that went through that area. It was from these mines that Thomas Dunford sent the first train load of coal to Chicago. It was only ten tons, but that order was most important in 1856-57. Other operators were Peter Syddal [sp. Sydell] and Benjamin Eccles. The greatest depth in Alton mines was 40 feet, and seams were 2-5 feet thick... In addition to the coal mines here supplying coal to Chicago, they also supplied Alton and the surrounding counties with coal."
 
History of Madison County, 18821882
page 108
      The Bickelhaupt family, and the Ritters came to Edwardsville from St. Clair county, where they had at first located.
Henry Ritter was one of the most energetic men of his time in our midst. He was a public-spirited man. Ritter opened the
first coal mine in the vicinity, and of course managed it so as to pay him well.
      An amusing incident of his mining period may be related here. His miners, knowing what price coal commanded in those days, went on a strike for higher wages. Ritter granted them immediately. Two hours later a second strike was announced and a higher price ; this time, it is said, eight cents per bushel was demanded and allowed. In the afternoon of the same day the miners made a third strike again, demanding ten or twelve cents per bushel. Mr. Ritter went to the shaft to deliver the following message : "The hoisting apparatus of these mines will be removed within fifteen minutes; and all miners remaining in the pit longer than fifteen minutes, must provide their own means of getting up and out." This settled matters, and no further strikes occurred. Ritter was successful in all his pursuits; he was a most diligent business man, sober and sagacious. He died quite young, in 1870.
page 344
Edwardsville
Wolf Brothers' Coal Mine
      This shaft is situated in the southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of section 11, about one-half mile southeast of Court-House Square. It was sunk by the above firm in the summer of 1879, with a capital investment of $20,000. Its depth is 217 feet to the surface of the coal, and the vein averages six and one- half feet. The coal is of the finest quality found in this part of the state. When the mine is worked to its full capacity, 7,000 bushels of coal are raised daily, and it requires 150 men to operate it. The amount for wages paid out per mouth, when in full blast, is $7,800. An engine of forty horse-power is employed in raising the coal. This firm is engaged in sinking another shaft on the Narrow Gauge railway.
 
St. Louis and Edwardsville Coal Compiany, J. S. Trares, President.
      This mine is located on section 10, on the City branch of the W. St. L & P. railroad. The shaft was sunk by Tunstell & Holmes, in 1868 or 1869. About ten years later it was purchased by John A. Prickett, and was leased by the above company in the fall of 1881 for the term of twenty years. The depth of the shaft is 125 feet, and the coal vein averages seven feet, When fully worked, it will mine 2,800 bushels of coal daily. The coal is raised by steam-power.
 
Schramek Coal Mine
      Opened by Frank Schrramek in the spring of 1879, and is located on the Wabash, St. Louis and Pacific Railway, on Union street. Its depth is 65 feet, and the coal vein averages six and one-half feet. The capital invested is $0,000. In the busy season, twenty-five men are employed, and will mine 200,000 bushels of coal within the year. The main shipments are made to St Louis. A 6O-horse power engine is employed to lift the coal.
 
      Another shaft, owned by Mrs. Smidt, is situated near the Wabash, St. Louis and Pacific Depot. This mine was opened by Henry Ritter about 1857, and came into the possession of Mrs. Smidt in 1877. Coal is reached at the depth of 96 feet, and the vein is five feet. Ten workmen are usually employed in this shaft, and mine from five to six hundred bushels of coal per day. Horse power is utilized in hoisting the coal.
 
page 418
Wood River
      Richard Cartledge opened a coal mine in section 1, as early as 1839. No shaft was sunk, as coal could be procured by drifting into the bluff.
 
page 420
Village of Bethalto
Coal Mines
      There are two small coal mines near the suburbs of the town. One is owned by David Brunton, the other by Michael Mayer. Bethalto is situated over a fine vein of coal which is from five to eight feet in thickness, and it is obtained by going only about 70 feet below the surface. The only wonder is, that this industry receives so little attention. The shafts in operation do but very little work, and are not prepared to do anything like an extensive business.
 
page 458
City of Collinsville
Mining and Manufacturing Interests
      There is a fine body of bituminous coal underlying the whole surface of this region of country, and in the vicinity of Collinsville the vein will average from seven and a half to eight feet in thickness. The coal found at a depth of 160 to 190 feet is of an excellent quality, and is extensively mined. The mines have a slate and limestone roof, and are comparatively dry. Some of them are mentioned above, as they are not within the corporate limits of the city.
 
Collinsville Coal and Mining Company
      This company is the owner of the first shaft that was sunk in Collinsville. It is the first mine east of the depot, and was sunk by Peter Wonderly, about 20 years ago. The mine was then worked by horse power.
      The company consists of George Savitz, president ; and J. H. Wickliffe, who are owners and proprietors of the mines.
      They operate two shafts, tlie second of which was sunk in 1873. The depth is 150 feet to the surface of the coal, and the vein will average seven and a half feet in thickness. They employ 100 men; capacity of the mines 11,000 bushels per day. Office, 414 Olive street, St. Louis.
 
Lumaghi Mine
      Was opened in 1869, by Octavius Lumaghi, and is still owned and operated by him. The shaft is 165 feet deep ; the vein will average from 7 to 8 feet. The average amount of men employed, sixty.
 
Cantine Coal and Mining Comapny
      The Cantine mine was sunk in 1873, by Morrison and Ambrosius, and is now owned by the above named company. The depth of the shaft is 182 feet to the coal, which averages 7½ to 8 feet in thickness. The company employ about 65 men. The average amount of coal mined in 1881 was 100,000 bushels per month. The officers of this company are: President, C. A. Ambrosius; Treasurer and Secretary, J. G. Gerding.
 
Abbey Coal and Mining Company
      This is the most extensive mining company on the line of the Vandalia Railroad. However, there is only one mine operated by them in Madison county, the others being in St. Clair. The shaft near the depot at Collinsviile, designated as "Abbey No. 3," was sunk by Reid and Strain, in 1875, and the following year leased it to the above company. It is 138 feet to the top of the coal. The vein will run from seven to 8 feet in thickness, and it is worked entirely by machinery, employing 60 men on top. The Lawrence Mine No. 4, is similar to that of No. 3, being a machine mine. The others are worked by the old system, employing in all from 400 to 500 men. In 1881 the Abbey company raised in all their mines 13,400 car loads, or about 5,000,000 bushels.
 
page 481
Libertyville
      A coal mine owned by
Green & Brothers, is situated about a mile from Moro, in section 6. It was sunk in 1880. The shaft is 90 feet, and the coal vein 4½ feet in thickness, and is of excellent quality. The coal is raised by horse-power, and it furnishes coal in quantities only to supply local demands.
 
Partial List Of Patrons
pages 562-585
C. A. Ambrosius, of Collinsville, coal operator, born in Hesse Cassel, Germany, came to Madison County in 1849.
Herman Bär, of Fosterburg, coal miner, born in Switzerland, came to Madison County in 1855.
Henry Camp, farmer and coal operator, of Section 34, North Alton, born in Harrisburg, PA, came to Madison County in 1850.
Mary Wearmouth Camp, wife of Henry Camp, born in Dubuque County, Iowa, came to Madison County in 1867.
Charles A. Gaiser, of Edwardsville, coal operator, born in Madison County, 1859.
Ann Robison Green, wife of Ephraim Green, born in Ludgate, Durham county, England, came to Madison County in 1859.
Ephraim Green, of Moro, coal operator, born in Straffordshire, England, came to Madison County in 1883.
J. L. Heintz, of Collinsville, coal operator, born in St. Louis, Missouri, came to Madison County in 1852.
J. A. Martin, of Edwardsville, coal operator, born in St. Louis, Missouri, came to Madison County in 1881.
Frank Schramek, of Edwarsville, coal operator, born in Austria, came to Madison County in 1854.
A. P. Wolf, of Edwardsville, coal operator, born in Madison County, 1841.
F. W. Wolf, of Edwardsville, coal operator, born in Madison County, 1840.
O. E. Wolf, of Edwardsville, coal operator, born in Madison County, 1847.
 
page 518
James Mitchell
portrait of James Mitchell       James Mitchell was born in Scotland, December 21st, 1811. His parents were Robert and Mary Mitchell. His father was well liked by his fellows, among whom he was somewhat a leader. When he determined on bettering his condition by seeking an American home, he brought with him some three hundred colonists. His objective point was Nova Scotia. On the 4th of July, 1829, they landed at Pictou, a seaport in that province, brought over safely by the brig " Hero of Gannock." In all, Robert had a family of eleven children, six daughters and five sons, of whom James was the eldest. Not altogether satisfied with Nova Scotia, they determined on emigrating to the "States," as then called, and made their way to Pottsville, Pennsylvania, in 1834. The subject of this sketch obtained a fair education in the common-schools of Scotland in his youth ; he was a clerk in a general store. When he reached his majority he worked in coal-mines, first in Nova Scotia, then in Pennsylvania.
      In 1835 he made his way to the salt works on the Kanawha river, in West Virginia; thence to Kentucky, stopped at a village on the Ohio river, about 130 miles below Louisville, thence to New Orleans. After a few years spent thus in looking about, he visited his old Nova Scotia home. While on this visit, he met and was united in marriage with Mary Smith, a native of the Island of Cape Breton. The marriage rites were celebrated in the city of Boston, Massachusetts, on the 7th of October, 1839. Soon thereafter he returned to the States, this time to Missouri, and in 1848 to Madison county. To him belongs the honor of having opened the first coal mine in Coal Branch, above Alton. By his first wife he had eight children, four of whom are living. She died October 4th, 1857. He was married to his present wife, whose maiden name was Margaret Bird, November 3d, 1857. Politically Mr. Mitchell is an earnest, unswerving Republican. His first ballot was cast for William H. Harrison. He has never failed attending a local Republican convention since the organization of the party, when physically able to do so. Although thoroughly awake to party spirit, he never would accept office, save the supervisorship, which was forced upon him one term. He has been often a member of the central committee, and has ever proved himself a most loyal citizen. Farming and operating in coal have engaged most of his attention since locating in this county.

Sources :
 
1 Coal Mines in Illinois, Madison County; including the Quadrangles of
                Alton, Bethalto, Collinsville, Edwardsville, Monks Mound, New Douglas, Prairietown, Wood River, Worden
                Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL. 61820

2 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1885
                A Supplemental Report; State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Reports of Mine Inspectors; For the Year Ended July1, 1885
                Springfield, ILL; H. W. Roker, State Printer and Binder, 1885

3 Statistics of Coal in Illinois, 1887
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1887

4 Sixth Biennial Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of Illinois, 1890
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1891

5 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1893
                Twelveth Annual Report
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1894

6 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1894
                Thirteenth Annual Report
                Springfield, ILL.; Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer, 1895

7 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1895
                Fourteenth Annual Report
                Springfield, ILL.; ED. F. Hartman, State Printer, 1896

8 Fifteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1896
                Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1897

9 Sixteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1897
                Coal in Illinois
                Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1898

10 Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1898
                Coal in Illinois
                Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1899

11 Eighteenth Annual Report Prepared by the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1899
                Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1899

12 Nineteenth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900,
                also the Second Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1900, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1901

13 Twentieth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1901,
                also the Third Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1901, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1902

14 Twenty-first Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1902,
                also the Fourth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1902, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1903

15 Twenty-second Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1903,
                also the Fifth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1903, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1904

16 Twenty-third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904,
                also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1904, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1905

17 Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905,
                also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1905, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1906

18 Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906,
                also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1906, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1907

19 Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907,
                also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1907, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield,
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1908

20 Twenty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1908
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1909

21 Twenty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1909
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1910

22 Twenty-Ninth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1910
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1911

23 Thirtieth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1911
                State Mining Board
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1912

24 Thirty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1912
                State Mining Board
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1913

25 Thirty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1913
                State Mining Board
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1914

26 Thirty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1914
                State Mining Board
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1914

27 Thirty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1915
                State Mining Board
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois; Springfield, ILL, Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1915

28 Thirty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1916
                State Mining Board
                Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1916

29 Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1917
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Year Ended June 30, 1917
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois
                Springfield: Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1917

30 Thirty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1918
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois
                Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1918

31 Thirty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1919
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois
                Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1919

32 Forty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1922
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1922

33 Forty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1923
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1923

34 Forty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1924
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1924

35 Forty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1925
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois State Journal Co., Springfield, Illinois., 1926

36 Forty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1926
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1927

37 Forty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1927
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1928

38 Forty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1928
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1929

39 Forty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1929
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Journal Printing Co., Springfield, ILL., 1930

40 Forty-Ninth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1930
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1931

41 Fiftieth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1931
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1932

42 Fifty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1932
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Journal Printing Co., Springfield, ILL., 1933

43 Fifty-Second Coal Report of Illinois, 1933
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

44 Fifty -Third Coal Report of Illinois, 1934
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

45 Fifty -Fourth Coal Report of Illinois, 1935
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

46 Fifty -Fifth Coal Report of Illinois, 1936
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

47 Fifty -Sixth Coal Report of Illinois, 1937
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

48 Fifty -Seventh Coal Report of Illinois, 1938
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

49 Fifty -Eighth Coal Report of Illinois, 1939
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

50 Fifty -Ninth Coal Report of Illinois, 1940
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

51 Sixtieth Coal Report of Illinois, 1941
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

52 Sixty First Coal Report of Illinois, 1942
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

53 Sixty Second Coal Report of Illinois, 1943
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

54 Sixty Third Coal Report of Illinois, 1944
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

55Sixty Fourth Coal Report of Illinois, 1945
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

56 Sixty Fifth Coal Report of Illinois, 1946
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

57 Sixty Sixth Coal Report of Illinois, 1947
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

58 Sixty-seventh Coal Report of Illinois, 1948
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

59 Sixty-eighth Coal Report of Illinois, 1949
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

60 Sixty-ninth Coal Report of Illinois, 1950
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

61 Seventieth Coal Report of Illinois, 1951
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

62 Seventy-fifth Coal Report of Illinois, 1956
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

63 Eighty-Second Coal Report of Illinois, 1963
                Department of Mines and Minerals
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

1882 History of Madison County, Illinois
                Published by W. R. Brink & Co., Edwardsville, Illinois, 1882

1912 Centennial History of Madison County, Illinois, and Its People, 1812-1912.
                Edited and compiled by W. T. Norton; Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1912.

2010 Wheaton, Sandi. . . Research notes
 

Coal & Coal Mining in Illinois

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