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Illinois
Coal & Coal Mining
History & Genealogy

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Logan County, Illinois

Featuring Coal Mining
 
      Logan County is a county located in the central part of the state of Illinois.
            40.13° N, 89.36° W
Logan County was established in 1839, and named after physician and State Representative John Logan.
 
      The population was 31,183 in 2000 and 30,305 in 2010.
 
      The county seat of Logan County, Illinois is Lincoln
 
      There are sixteen townships in the county :
Aetna, Atlanta, Broadwell, Chester, Corwin, East Lincoln, Elkhart, Eminence, Hurlbut,
Lake Fort, Mt. Pulaski, Oran, Orvil, Prairie Creek, Sheridan, West Lincoln
 
      Some of the Cities and Towns are :
Atlanta, Beason, Broadwell, Burtonview, Chestervale, Chestnut, Cornland,
Elkhart, Emden, Hartsburg, Lake Fork, Lawndale, Latham, Lincoln,
Middletown, Mount Pulaski, New Holland, San Jose
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1885 2       Logan County
      There are three shafts in this county working seam No. 5, which averages four feet ten inches in thickness. It is somewhat impaired by clay seams and "horse-backs," and reached at a depth of of from 265 to 360 feet. There have been 172,500 tons of coal produced in the last year in this county.
 
1908 Annual Coal Report 15
Enforcement of the Mining Law
      During the year several operators in the district have been fined by the courts for neglecting to file maps of their mines as required by law. Several miners have also been fined for opening powder kegs with picks in direct violation of the law. A shot-firer at Lincoln was prosecuted and fined for firing shots before the men had left their working places, and for giving a miner a squib with which to light his own shot.
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Fatalities      Non-Fatal Casualties       Sources

Bliss Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Logan County - Township 20 North, 3 West, Section 27
Underground Mine, at a depth of 278 feet, and an average coal seam of 5½ feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Bliss Coal Mine   Bliss Coal Company   1939 - 1946
Last reported production was in 1946
[Source - No. 1, Index 2747]

Brewerton Coal Mines
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Brewerton Coal Mine No. 2
The legal description lists this as :    Logan County - Township 20 North, 2 West, Section 30, NE SE NE
Underground Mine, at a depth of 280 feet, and an average coal seam of 5.1 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
North Coal Mine   Latham Coal Company   1903 - 1919
Latham-Lincoln Coal Mine   Latham-Lincoln Coal Company   1920 - 1921
Sangamon Coal Mine   Sangamon Coal Company   1921 - 1922
Brewerton Coal Mine No. 2   Brewerton Coal Company   1923 - 1933
Last reported production was in 1933
[Source - No. 1, Index 33]
 
See : Newspaper articles about the Explosion in the Latham Mine, February 1913
 
1902 Annual Coal Report 9
New Mines
      The Latham Coal Co., of Springfield, Ill., has completed the sinking of a new mine at Lincoln, Logan county. This mine is equipped in first class style with all modern improvements, and will be a large producer in the future; the company is now engaged in sinking an escapement shaft.
 
1903 Annual Coal Report 10
Escapement Shafts
      The Latham Coal Company, Lincoln, after a good deal of trouble with sand and water, and at a big expense has finally succeeded in completing the escapement shaft at this mine.
 
1904 Annual Coal Report 11
Improvements
      The Latham Coal Co. of Lincoln, has put in a new 12-foot Robinson fan, and has also made changes underground, putting in overcasts, and splitting the air which ahs improved the ventilation materially.
 
1906 Annual Coal Report 13
Improvements
      The Latham Coal Co., Lincoln, Logan county, has replaced its old hoisting engine with a very fine pair of Litchfield engines. These engines are equipped with a steam brake and also with a self-acting attachment to prevent overwinding. The engines are 24 x 40 inches, the drum 8 feet in diameter.
 
1922 Annual Coal Report 22
Change of Name
      Latham-Lincoln Mining Co., Lincoln is now operated by Sangamon County Mining Co.
 
1934 Annual Coal Report 29
Idle Mines       Logan County : Brewerton Coal Company No. 92, at Lincoln in Logan County.
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1923 Annual Coal Report 23
Change of Name
      Sangamon County Mining Company and Citizens Coal Mining Company, Lincoln, Logan County, to Brewerton Coal Company Nos. 2 and 3 respectively.
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Brewerton Coal Mine No. 3
The legal description lists this as :    Logan County - Township 20 North, 2 West, Section 32, SE SW NW
Underground Mine, at a depth of 266 feet, and an average coal seam of 5 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Citizens Coal Mine   Citizens Coal Company   1883 - 1922
Brewerton Coal Mine No. 3   Brewerton Coal Company   1923 - 1925
Last reported production was in 1925
[Source - No. 1, Index 109]
The Citizens' Coal Mining Co. 2
      This shaft is 265 feet deep, located one mile east of Lincoln, at the junction of the P., D. & E. and Wabash railroads. It has been in operation since September, 1883. The equipment of this mine is first-class throughout, and it is abundantly ventilated by an eight-foot fan of their own construction. The top buildings at this mine are covered with corrugated iron, and the proprietors are now engaged in sinking an escapement shaft 200 feet from hoisting shaft, which will in all probability be completed some time in October, the sand bed having been passed in safety.
      Henry Ahrens, Superintendent; John Jones, Mine Manager.
 
1903 Annual Coal Report 10
Improvements
      The Citizens' Coal Mining Company, Lincoln, Logan county, has sunk an additional chamber at its mine, alongside the main shaft, and down to the lake of water, that was encountered in order to reduce the pressure, and drain the water out of the main shaft. The company has retimbered the upper part of the hoisting shaft, also raised and repaired and put a new foundation under the tower.
 
1904 Annual Coal Report 11
Improvements
      The Citizens' Coal Co., Lincoln, has raised the tower at its mine, putting in a new foundation. The company has also put in a 100-ton scale, two shaker screens and built a 350-ton screen house with roller screens; a relief shaft has been sunk to the lake a depth of 45 feet.
 
1905 Annual Coal Report 12
Improvements
      The Citizens' Coal Co., Lincoln, Logan county, has installed a new Cappel fan, 15 feet in diameter, from which is expected a decided improvement in the ventilation of its mine.
 
1925 Annual Coal Report 24
Mines Not Operated       Brewerton Coal Company No. 3
 
1929 Annual Coal Report 24
Mines Abandoned 1921-1929       Logan County : Brewerton Coal Company No. 93

El-Ben Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Logan County - Township 19 North, 2 West, Section 5, SE SW SE
Underground Mine, at a depth of 273 feet, and an average coal seam of 5.1 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Deer Creek Coal Mine   Deer Creek Coal Company   1937 - 1947
Deer Creek Coal Mine   Steve Bennis   1948 - 1953
Deer Creek Coal Mine   Deer Creek Coal Company   1954 - 1956
Lincoln Coal Mine No. 1   Lincoln Coal Mining Company   1956 - 1963
Logan County Coal Mine   Logan County Coal Mining Company   1963 - 1965
El-Ben Coal Mine No. 2   El-Ben Coal Company   1965 - 1968
Last reported production was in 1968
[Source - No. 1, Index 639]

Lincoln Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Logan County - Townships
19 North, 3 West , Section 1, NE NW NW & 20 North, 3 West, Section 36, SE SE NE
Underground Mine, at a depth of 280 feet, and an average coal seam of 5 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Lincoln Coal Mine No. 1   Lincoln Coal Mining Company   1869 - 1918
Last reported production was in 1918
[Source - No. 1, Index 2748]
The Lincoln Coal Mining Co. 2
      This is a shaft 280 feet deep, located at Lincoln, at the junction of the C. & A. and Wabash railroads. When first visited, this mine was in deplorable condition, showing very poor management. The roadways were badly timbered and narrow. There were 7,920 cubic feet of air per minute passing for 114 men and 12 mules, and this was highly charged with carbonic acid gas and carbonic oxide, which, in the afternoon firing, was almost unbearable. Subsequent visits found the mine much improved by the erection of a Brazil fan ten feet in diameter, located at the bottom of the air chamber of the shaft, producing 21,000 cubic feet of air, being 13,000 cubic feet more than was found at first visit. The roadways had been retimbered and the area enlarged, and an effort had been made to turn air around working places by the use of screens on entries. Section 16 of the mining law was being violated, but its requirements are now filled. The framework around the top of the shaft was burned down April 16, at two o'clock in the morning. Eight men in the mine at the time were safely hoisted out at the escapement shaft, one mile distant from the main shaft. The pit-head frame was rebuilt and in operation two weeks from the date of the fire, the cause of which is unknown.
      Frank Frorer, Superintendent
      James Daily, Mine Manager.
1904 Annual Coal Report11
Mine Fires
      Dec. 17, 1903, the Lincoln Coal Co.'s mine at Lincoln, Logan county, was discovered to be on fire by the mine examiner, when going down the shaft to begin his duty of examining the mine. The engine that operates the endless rope haulage, is situated on the bottom of the shaft, as is also the fan used to ventilate the mine. The fire started in the engine house, destroying it and the fan and fan house. One hundred feet of the timbers along the entry at the bottom of the shaft were destroyed. Before work could be resumed at the bottom, about 60 feet of the top of the shaft had to be retimbered. The work of repairing the damage is now nearing completion, and the company expects to commence mining coal again in a short time. The loss entailed by the fire is estimated at $50,000.
 
1905 Annual Coal Report 12
Improvements
      The Lincoln Coal Co. has repaired and installed the fan in the bottom of its mine, this is the fan used before the fire in this mine, December 1903. It is expected that this will greatly improve the ventilation in the mine.

Mt. Pulaski Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Logan County - Township 18 North, 2 West, Section 14, SW SW SE
Underground Long-Wall Mine, at a depth of 365 feet, and an average coal seam of 4 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Fox Coal Mine   B. F. Fox   1882 - 1883
Mt. Pulaski Coal Mine   Mt. Pulaski Coal Company   1883 - 1887
Union Coal Mine   Union Coal Company   1888 - 1889
Mt. Pulaski Coal Mine   Mt. Pulaski Coal Company   1900 - 1902
Home Coal Mine   Home Coal Company   1903 - 1906
Mutual Coal Mine   Mutual Coal Company   1907 - 1909
Mt. Pulaski Coal Mine   Mt. Pulaski Coal Company   1910 - 1915
Last reported production was in 1915
[Source - No. 1, Index 278]
The Mt. Pulaski Coal Co. 2
      This is a shaft 360 feet deep, located within the corporate limits of Mt. Pulaski, on a branch of the Illinois Central R. R. This mine is very difficult to work, owing to the coal being streaked with dirt seams. The mode of working has been changed from pillar and room to long-wall, which is now being carried on successfully. The ventilation system in this mine is good, produced by a fan of their own make, after the Guibal pattern. An escapement shaft is being sunk, which would have been completed in September, but will be delayed by the caving in of the shaft near the top where the material is soft, the curbing being too light to resist the pressure.
      H. C. Suttle, Superintendent.
      James Small, Mine Manager.
1916 Annual Coal Report 20
Closed or Abandoned Mines       Mt. Pulaski Mining Association

Viper Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Logan County - Township 18 North, 3 West, Section 20, SE NE NW
Underground Mine, at a depth of 275 feet, and an average coal seam of 5.6 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Elkhart Coal Mine   Turris Coal Company   1982 - 1994
Elkhart Coal Mine   Zeigler-Old Ben Coal Company   1994 - 2003
Viper Coal Mine   I. C. G. Illinois, LLC
A subsidiary of International Coal Group, Inc.
  2004 -
[Source - No. 1, Index 998]

Logan County, Illinois
Coal Mine Fatalities
BEDFORD
December 2, 192725, James Bedford, of Lincoln, shot firer, age 51 years, married died from injuries received November 26 from falling slate in Brewerton Coal Company's No. 92 mine. He leaves a widow.
 
BLICK
November 14, 192524, Frank Blick, of Lincoln, miner, age 20 years, single, was killed in Brewerton Coal Company's No. 2 mine by a fall of slate. He leaves two brothers and two sisters dependent.
 
July 5, 191821, Joseph Blick, of Lincoln, miner, age 46 years, married, was killed in Latham Coal and Mining Company's mine, Lincoln, by a fall of slate. He leaves a widow and six children.
 
DENNY
November 14, 191117, Harry Denny, of Lincoln, miner, aged 18 years, single, met his death in the Latham Coal Company's mine at Lincoln, Logan county. Deceased was taken ill in his room in the mine about 10:30 a. m. He came out to the entry and sat down, then fell over and never regained consciousness. The verdict of the coroner's jury was that his death was caused by asphyxia.
 
EVANS
February 3, 19007, Thomas Evans, aged 53 years, married, was killed by a premature blast in a room of the Lincoln Coal Company's mine. He had fired two shots before the one that killed him, and had returned and lit the third one, which was on the far side of the room and a considerable distance from the road leading to the entry, and in going out he got bewildered in the smoke and did not get far enough away to avoid being struck by flying coal, killing him instantly. He was of Welsh birth, and left a widow and three children dependent. He resided in Lincoln.
 
GLEASON
May 15, 18933, Michael Gleason, of Lincoln, age 40, married, leaves a widow and three children. He was employed as a laborer on the night shift by the Lincoln Coal Co., Lincoln, and, at the time of the accident, was, with others, building up the entrance to an abandoned room that had caved in a few days before. They were instructed to use, and were furnished with safety lamps; when the room was nearly closed off, the fire damp collected in the abandoned room moving through the small opening that yet remained and ignited from a naked light. The deceased, being the only person directly opposite the room, was instantly killed by the force of the explosion that occurred, it having blown out the wall they were building, the debris of which completely covered Gleason. Upon investigation afterward it was found the safety lamps had not been used that evening.
 
HASSE
November 23, 18986 -- Andrew Hasse, of Lincoln, a miner, employed in the Citizens' Coal Co., Lincoln, met death on the evening of Nov. 23, 1898, by the inhalation of carbonic oxide gas. At the regular shooting time deceased had fired a shot that had not sufficient amount of powder to blast the coal loose, and in mining parlance had "whistled through the needle hole," giving off very little smoke but a considerable amount of gas. In his haste to leave the mine with the other men he did not wait for the gas to be removed with the air, but went in to recharge the same hole. The evidence plainly showed that he understood the danger he was in, as he had retreated to the cross-cut for fresh air before he had completed his task of recharging. He hastened back once more and commenced to tamp the hole, when he felt his senses leaving him. He made a frantic effort to reach the cross-hole again when he got bewildered out of the right road, where he was found by the night boss at about 7 p. m. He left a widow and three children dependent.
 
HEALY
October 11, 192223, Tim Healy, of Lincoln, weighman, age 56 years, married, was killed at Brewerton Coal Company's No. 2 mine at Lincoln. Deceased was clearing the rails when two cars pulled by a team of horses bumped into a car in front of which he was standing and his head was caught in the frame of a wheel. He leaves a widow and one child.
 
HOOLY
September 10, 190614, Charles Hooly, of Mt. Pulaski, miner, aged 38 years, single, and Charles Pap, of Mt. Pulaski, miner, aged 41 years, married, were both killed by falling down the shaft at the Mt. Pulaski mine, operated by the Mutual Coal Company.
 
HULSHER
January 17, 191620, Harry Hulsher, of Lincoln, laborer, age 23 years, married, was killed in Lincoln Mining Company's mine, Lincoln, Logan County. Deceased was oiling a revolving screen when his clothing was caught in the shafting and he was drawn between the shafting and timber and crushed to death. He leaves a widow and two children.
 
JAMES
December 15, 191016, Marion James, of Lincoln, driver, aged 22 years, married, was injured by being kicked by his mule from the effect of which he died January 11. Deceased was employed by Citizens Coal Company. He leaves a widow and two children.
 
JACOBS
November 29, 191219, Ignatz Jacobs, of Lincoln, miner, aged 50 years, married, employed in the Latham Mining Company's mine, Lincoln, Logan County, was killed by pit cars. He leaves a widow and seven children.
 
October 6, 191520, Louis Jacobs, of Lincoln, miner, age 23 years, married, was killed by a fall of slate in the Latham Coal Mining Company's mine, Lincoln, Logan County. He leaves a widow.
 
LEPUSBETZ
October 28, 190715, Valentine Lepusbetz, of Lincoln, miner, aged 36 years, married, was killed under very strange conditions in the mine of the Citizens' Coal Mining Company at Lincoln. In my investigation of this case it was found that the shot-firer had begun firing the shots in the mine one hour before the proper firing time, and while the miners were still in the mine. In questioning Oscar Menzel, the shot-firer, in regard to the cause of Lepubetz's death, he said that the man came out onto the entry and asked him for a squib to light his shot; that he gave Lepusbetz a squib; that afterwards he went into the man's room, after the shot had exploded, and found deceased lying on the gob with the back of his head fractured. He leaves a widow and one child.
 
LOOMIS
February 1, 191318, Henry Weitkamper, of Lincoln, miner, aged 26 years, married, and Thomas Loomis, of Lincoln, electrician, aged 47 years, married, were instantly killed by an explosion of gas in the Latham Coal Company's mine, Lincoln, Logan County. The explosion occurred on the haulage road and no one knows how it happened. Twenty-one workmen had passed the point not more than thirty minutes previous to the accident. Thomas Loomis was repairing the trolley wire on the pillar side of the entry when Weitkamper came along and the explosion took place, killing them instantly. Each man leaves a widow and three children.
See : Newspaper articles about the Explosion in the Latham Mine

 
LYONS
February 26, 192222, Patrick Lyons, of Lincoln, miner, age 63 years, married, died from the effects of injuries received eleven days previous by a fall of slate in Sangamon County Mining Company's mine, Lincoln, Logan County.
 
MAGRAM
June 4, 18954, The body of an unknown man was found at the bottom of the Lincoln Coal Company's shaft at Lincoln, Logan county. Daniel Bodwell, cager, went down in the mine about 7 o'clock A. M. to start the pump, after running the pump two hours he went to measure how far the water was down in the sump, when he found a large hole in the planks with which the sump was covered over. On making a further examination he found the dead body of a man under the timber. Later, at the coroner's inquest, the body was identified as that of John Magram, of Malvern Junction, Arkansas. How he came to fall down the shaft at a distance of 265 feet is not known. The verdict was that he came to his death by falling down the shaft.
 
MANN
May 19, 190512, Garrett Mann, Jr., of Lincoln, driver, aged 24 years, in the employ of the Latham Coal Co., Lincoln, Logan county, was fatally injured by being crushed between loaded pit cars. The accident occurred about 7:30 a. m.; he died about two hours afterwards.
 
MARAS
April 29, 193328, Kalzmer Maras, of Petersburg, miner, age 48 years, married, died from injuries received the day before by an explosion of gas in Lincoln Coal Company's mine. Deceased was examining for gas with an open light. He leaves a widow and two children.
 
McCANN
January 20, 192323, John McCann, of Lincoln, cager, age 64 years, married, was killed by being knocked into the sump by a car striking him, in the Brewerton Coal Company's No. 2 mine. He leaves a widow and three children.
 
McNULTA
November 7, 18997, Patrick McNulta, of Lincoln, aged 45 years, married, was killed in the mine of the Citizens' Coal Co., by flying coal from a shot. Deceased had lighted a shot at the same time another man head in an adjoining room, and both parties had retires to a safe place, when they heard one shot go off, and deceased declared it was his shot that had exploded, and started in to light another one when the shot from the adjoining room exploded, blowing through into the room of deceased just as he (deceased) had arrived in front of the shot that exploded, and the flying coal struck him on top of the head, tearing away the whole top of his head. He left a widow and seven little children dependent.
 
MINZEL
August 24, 191821, Julius Minzel, of Lincoln, timberman, age 38 years, married, was killed by a fall of slate in Citizens Coal Mining Company's mine, Lincoln. He leaves a widow and two children.
 
MORGAN
January 12, 190512, Hugh Morgan, of Lincoln, miner, acting as a shot-firer, aged 23 years, single, employed in the mine of the Latham Coal Co., Lincoln, Logan county, was fatally injured by flying coal from a shot and died from his injuries three days afterwards. Deceased with his partner had gone into a room for the purpose of firing two shots; the shot Morgan lighted exploded before he could reach a place of safety, with the result as stated.
 
PALOVICH
February 21, 191318, Charles Palovich, of Lincoln, timberman, aged 22 years, married, was killed by falling slate the the Latham Coal Company's mine, Lincoln, Logan County. Deceased was taking out the track from an abandoned entry and was in the act of lifting a room switch when a mass of slate fell from the side, causing injuries from which he died next day. He leaves a widow.
 
PAP
September 10, 190614, Charles Hooly, of Mt. Pulaski, miner, aged 38 years, single, and Charles Pap, of Mt. Pulaski, miner, aged 41 years, married, were both killed by falling down the shaft at the Mt. Pulaski mine, operated by the Mutual Coal Company.
 
PAUSE ( POUSE )
January 30, 190411, Max Pouse, miner, aged 26 years, single, in the employ of the Latham Coal Co., Lincoln, Logan county, was instantly killed by flying coal from a shot. The accident happened about 4:15 p. m., as all the firing is done at quitting time in this mine; the men also work single. From the appearance of the room afterwards, there had been two shots fired; from the position of the body, when found, the deceased must have been standing directly in front of the shot when it exploded, as he was lying on his back, his breast crushed, and his collar bone and one arm broken; his face was also cut and bruised with the fine coal, and the back of the skull crushed. His body was lying at a distance of about 20 feet from the face of the room. Pouse had been to this country about eight months, and leaves a dependent mother in Germany.
The Lincoln Daily New-Herald, 30
Lincoln, Illinois, February 1904
 
Killed Saturday Night;
Found Monday Morning
 
Young Max Pause, a Miner, Found
Dead In His Room in the Latham Coal Mine.

 
      Mystery surrounds the death of Max Pause, a young coal digger, who was found early Monday morning in his room at the bottom of the Lathams mine. The man was killed by a powder shot late Saturday afternoon and lay where he fell until found about 6 o;clock Monday morning by Micahel Savage, the fire boss, who was making his regular rounds previous to the men going to work.
      No one is able to tell just when and how Pause was killed. Everything indicates that he lost his life by his own shot at firing time, about 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon. Thomas Higgins, who worked in the room adjoining, knew nothing of the mishap. It is thought that Pause was mistaken in thinking that his shot had been fired, and just as he returned to his room the explosion occurred and he was killed.
      Pause was so badly shot about the face and head that the fire boss did not as first recognize him. One of his arms was broken and his chest was crushed by the fall of coal and the force of the shot.
      Savage called help and the body was taken above and placed in the company's office. Deputy Coroner Boyden was notified and he took the remains to his office.
      The accident was unknown at the mine, as it was thought that all men left the mine as usual Saturday evening. Pause made his home with his aunt, Mrs. William Heinzel, on East Broadway, and the family all day Sunday were at a loss to know where the young man was. They made an unsuccessful search for him over town.
      Max Pause was a single man about 25 years of age. Last July he arrived in Lincoln from the old country and in the fall began work in the Latham mine. Paul, Herman and Gustave Pause are uncles of the deceased.
      The body was taken to the residence of Mrs. Heinzel Monday afternoon. No arrangements have yet been made for the funeral and burial.
 
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Funeral Notice

      The funeral of the late Max Pause, who was found dead in the Latham coal mine Monday morning, will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at St. John's church. Burial in Union cemetery.
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The Lincoln Daily New-Herald, 30
Lincoln, Illinois, Wednesday, February 3, 1904
 
Coroner Holds Inquest As
To Coal Miners Death
 
Termination of Max Pause's Earthly Existence Was Due to Explosion of Powder.

 
      Nothing new or unusual developed in the inquest conducted by Coroner Boyden at his office Wednesday morning over the death of Max Pause, the young coal digger who was found at the bottom of the Latham mine early Monday morning, having laid there since Saturday evening, when he was killed by a shot.
      The jury after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict to the effect that Pause came to his death by approaching a shot in the mine of the Latham Coal Company on Saturday, Jan 30. The jury was composed of the following: George I. Harry, foreman; John Q. Smith, J. H. Rhoads, Charles Lipp, James Lawler and C. J. Woland.
      The witnesses were Drs. Meloy and Rembe, who held a postmortem examination, and the following mine employees: Michael Savage, Thomas Higgins, Mike Riley, George Doudel, Eugene McCVabe, William P. Cashen, D. P. Wolf and William Connors.
 
October 12, 190513, Paul Pouse, of Lincoln, shot firer, 36 years old, married, was killed by the premature explosion of a shot in the mine of the Latham Coal Co., Lincoln,, Logan county. It is supposed that while tamping the shot he struck some sulphur in the hole causing the ignition of the powder, He leaves a widow and four children.
Unknown Publication 30
 
Deadly Accident in Latham Mine
 
Paul Pause, Shot Firer, Killed While Working With his Partner,
 
Death was Instantaneous
 
The Death Due to the Unexpected Explosion of a Shot That Deceased Had Lighted and Which He Believed Extinguished -- An Expert Workman.

 
      Paul Pause, shot firer in the mine of the Latham Coal company, was instantly killed Thursday evening between the hours of 6 and 7 o'clock while engaged in his work in connection with his partner and nephew, Albert Heinzel.
      The man had a number of shots to fire and in one of the rooms there was one charge which had not exploded, which Mr. Pause said was in a gaseous condition. He left his partner to examine the shot withholding explosion and was struck, hurled twenty feet and instantly killed by the charge exploding about the time he faced it.
      When darkness and silence followed the explosion of the blast, Mr. Heinzel knew something was wrong. His calls remaining unanswered the young mans entered the apartment with a light and the sight told the story of Paul Pause's tragic death.
      Resting on a pile of coal was the human victim of force was dead with both temples crushed.
      Help was summoned and the body taken charge of by fellow workmen and removed to Ryan & Purinton's undertaking establishment, prepared for burial and sent to the home on North Kankakee street, where weeping widow and five small children ranging from 13 years downward joined with the widow in lamentations.
      Paul Pause, the victim of the explosion, was a native of Germany. He was born in Woldenburg, August 20, 1868, came to America in 1883, and located in Lincoln, proving an industrious and upright man.
 
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Unknown Publication 30
Coroner's Inquest.
      Saturday afternoon in the coroner's office at the court house. Coroner Purinton and a jury of six men inquired into the cause of death of the late Paul Pause. The witnesses examined were Albert Heinzel, a fellow shotfirer, and James J. Dean, Fred Schoof,William Connors and William Ryan. No one saw the incident and at the conclusion of the testimony the jury composed of William Foster, Robert B. White, George W. Parker, James Morgan, James Corwine and W. H. Derby, brought in the following verdict:
      "We, the jury, find that Paul Pause came to his death by fracture of the skull and crushing of the brain tissues due to being struck by flying coal from the explosion of a shot fired by his own hands while regularly employed as a shot firer in the coal mine operated by the Latham Coal Co."
-------------------------------------

Unknown Publication 30
 
Burial Of Paul Pause

Various Societies of City Follow Deceased to Last Resting Place.
 
      The funeral of the late Paul Pause, who was killed in the Latham mine Thursday evening, occurred at 2 o'clock p. m., Sunday from St. John's church. The funeral procession is said to have contained a larger number of men than have attended any funeral in late years. This was due, in a great measure to the popularity of the comparatively young man who had a host of friends and acquaintances both in and outside the circles of many organizations of which he was a member.
      The friends gathered at the home at 1:30 p. m., and marched from there to the church. In the line of march were the three local unions of the U. M. W. of A., Lincoln and Mozart lodges I. O. O. F., Kickapoo and Keokuk tribes of Red Men, Ancient Order of United Workmen, American Home Circle and the K. U. V. a society of St. John's church.
      The church was filled to overflowing and the friends and comrades opened ranks at the entrance of the church while the body of deceased was carried into the church.
      The exercises were conducted according to the rules of the church, following which the remains were taken to Union cemetery for interment.
      Acting as pallbearers were George Betticher, George Strump, Frank Keatz, Phillip Krieg, Joe Herget and Edward Mittendorf.
      There were a number from other points who attended the services. Among these were Mr. and Mrs. Will Johnson and family of Bloomington, Mrs. Bertha Diepenbook, mother-in-law of deceased, Mr. and Mrs. Will Diepenbrook and son, John, Pekin, and Mrs. George Krueger, a daughter of decedent, from Chicago.
RAPPE
December 18, 18975, Jacob Rappe, of Lincoln, a miner, aged 25 years, married, employed at the mine of the Citizens' Coal Company, at Lincoln, was instantly killed, at noon, by a blast of coal. He had lighted a shot at the same time that the party working in the adjoining room did; after hearing the report of a shot, which he believed was his own, he started into the room, intending to light a second shot. Just as he reached the face of his room, the first shot exploded, killing him instantly. He was a native of Germany and leaves an invalid widow and two small children dependent.
 
WANSAVAGE
October 16, 193127, Walter Wansavage, of Lincoln, miner, age 58 years, married, was killed by a fall of slate in Brewerton Coal Company's No. 92 mine. He leaves a widow.
 
WANSHOR
December 17, 190715, John Wanshor, of Lincoln, shot-firer, aged 24 years, single, was killed in the mine of the Lincoln Mining Company, Lincoln. Deceased went back to examine a shot before it had exploded. The shot-firers were using both sulphur and gas squibs. His partner informed me that he had just passed the switch and that deceased had not had time to place another squib in the hole when he saw Wanshor blown against the rib of the entry, a distance of thirty feet.
 
WEITKAMPER
February 1, 191318, Henry Weitkamper, of Lincoln, miner, aged 26 years, married, and Thomas Loomis, of Lincoln, electrician, aged 47 years, married, were instantly killed by an explosion of gas in the Latham Coal Company's mine, Lincoln, Logan County. The explosion occurred on the haulage road and no one knows how it happened. Twenty-one workmen had passed the point not more than thirty minutes previous to the accident. Thomas Loomis was repairing the trolley wire on the pillar side of the entry when Weitkamper came along and the explosion took place, killing them instantly. Each man leaves a widow and three children.
See : Newspaper articles about the Explosion in the Latham Mine
Photo of Henry Weitkamper
Henry Weitkamper
Photo courtesy of Bill Donath 30
The Lincoln Evening Star, Lincoln, Illinois, Monday, February 3, 1913, page 5; 30
Mortuary
Henry Weitkamper
The Lincoln Evening Star, Lincoln, Illinois,Monday, February 3, 1913, page 5; Obituary of Henry Weitkamper Mortuary Henry Weitkamper       Henry Weitkamper was born at Braceville, Grundy county, Illinois, on Jan. 15, 1884, and at the time of his death was 29 years and 16 days of age.
      When but an infant he removed with his parents to this city, where he received his education and where he began work, first at Lincoln collar factory, until he was 19 years of age, and then entered the Latham coal mine as a miner.
      In 1905 he was married to Miss May Carlyle, and to this union three children were born, Catherine, Carl and Ruby, ranging in age for 6 to 1 year. Besides the devoted wife and children, Mr. Weitkamper leaves to mourn his death his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weitkamper, and the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. D. S. Quickel, Anderson, Ind.; Mrs. C. W. Hoard, Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. Frank Williamson, Catherine, Clara, John, Frederick and Anna, all of this city.
      The funeral services of Mr. Weitkamper will be held at 9 a. m. Tuesday, Feb. 4, at St. mary's church, Rev. Father J. E. Koppes to officiate. Interment will be in St. Mary's cemetery.
      The remains were taken to the late home, on Williamette avenue, to await burial services.
      The following jurors have been sworn in and will serve at the inquest to be held later, this jury also to serve at the inquest for Thomas Loomis, which will be held at the same time: Samuel Cosby, William Downey, Patrick McCann, Edward Spellman, Joseph Schott and Ben Feldman.
 
The Lincoln Evening Star, Lincoln, Illinois,Tuesday, February 4, 1913, page 5; 30
Funerals
Henry Weitkamper
      One of the most pathetic funeral services ever held in this city were those over the remains of the late Henry Weitkamper, who met an untimely death in the Latham coal mine last Saturday morning. The services were held at St. Mary's church at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning, the edifice being filled with relatives and friends of the deceased and the members of his family.
      The services were especially sad, as the head of a dependent family was cut down in death, a wife lost a devoted companion, and relatives, friends and associates one of the most generous, companionable and considerate of beings.
      The members of Local No. 815, United Mine Workers of America, attended the services in a body, as did also members of Kickapoo tribe, Red Men, of which he was a member.
      Three hundred or more members of the miners' union, of which Mr. Weitkamper was a member marched in the funeral procession, heads bowed in sorrow and voices hushed through respect for the dead.
      The Red Men turned out in strong force and had charge of the services outside the church and conducted the ritual at the grave in the cemetery with their touching rites, which found grounds for deep solemnity in the minds of the living as a beautiful white dove was tirned loose over the grave and sought liberty and contentment in flight.
      In the sacred confines of St. Mary's church and unusually large audience assembled. The church exercises were conducted by Rev. Father J. E. Koppes and proved very impressive, creating a veneration for God and inspiring all present with resolutions to give the church more attention in the future as those living to see the rites may before long become subjects of similar services.
      Henry Weitkamper was born at Braceville, Grundy county, Illinois, on Jan. 15, 1884, and at the time of his death was 29 years and 16 days of age.
      When but an infant he removed with his parents to this city, where he received his education and where he began work, first at Lincoln collar factory, until he was 19 years of age, and then entered the Latham coal mine as a miner.
      In 1905 he was married to Miss May Carlyle, and to this union three children were born, Catherine, Carl and Ruby, ranging in age for 6 to 1 year. Besides the devoted wife and children, Mr. Weitkamper leaves to mourn his death his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weitkamper, and the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. D. S. Quickel, Anderson, Ind.; Mrs. C. W. Hoard, Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. Frank Williamson, Catherine, Clara, John, Frederick and Anna, all of this city.
      The following members of the Red Men acted as pall-bearers Joseph Donath, John Donath, Benjamin Donath, William Smith, Eugene Hopp and Nicholas Hopp. Interment was in St. Mary's cemetery.
WILKIE
October 9, 191520, C. F. H. Wilkie, of Lincoln, shot firer, age 28 years, single, was killed in the Citizens Coal Mining Company's mine, Lincoln, Logan County, by the explosion of a windy shot.
 
WOLF
March 23, 190411, Claude Wolf, trapper, aged 16 years, employed by the Latham Coal Company, Lincoln, Logan county, was fatally injured by a loaded pit-car running over him, from the effects of which he died four hours afterwards. The driver had stopped his mule at the door to fill his lamp with oil; while doing so the mule started and the boy thinking he was going to run away jumped on the seat to stop the mule. There being a down grade at that place and the cars running rather fast the boy became frightened, lost his light and jumped from the car to the side; the first car passed him, when he either stepped or fell between the cars, the last one passing over him with the above result.

Newspaper articles about the Explosion in the Latham Mine
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
The Lincoln Evening Star, Lincoln, Illinois, Saturday, February 1, 1913, page 8 30
Disastrous Explosion           
           In the Latham Mine

One Miner Burned and Two Miners Entombed by
the Terrible and Unexpected Happening at
an Early Hour on Saturday
 
Heavy Loss To Company

 
Fifteen Men at Work in the Particular Part of the
Mine While a Full Force Was Employed in the
Entire Mine Which Had to be Temporarily Closed.
           The Dead.
Henry Weitkampfer
Thomas Loomis
 
           The Injured
James Waters
John Kolar, miner, overcome by afterdamp; taken to St. Clara's hospital
Luke Stone, miner, slightly injured by falling between car and timbers at time of explosion.
 
      Saturday morning at 8:30 o'clock the Latham coal mine sustained a serious and disastrous explosion, which imperiled many lives for a while. The explosion occurred in the northeast part of the pit and was of such force and effect that it caused consternation to prevail among the company men and the miners for a time, as the extent of the disaster could not be told with the rooms and entries in darkness, but as soon as the brave men who work underground could obtain lights and proceed with an investigation they found that while the explosion was serious to three of their fellow workmen and would prove a heavy loss to the company, that the disaster was not as bad as first feared.
      In the section of the mine where the explosion occurred fifteen men were working. James Waters was found and rescued, suffering from burns, and two men, Thomas Loomis and Henry Weitkampfer, could not be accounted for and it was feared they were lost in the part of the mine which could not be approached except by slow process.
      The explosion was terrific in force, as described by those who heard and felt it. Every light was extinguished in the vicinity and in distant parts of the mine the force warned the workers to seek safety and they did. In the section where the force and damage were the greatest the effects cannot be described. Men were hurled to one side and prostrated, as though they were no more than chaff, but in falling they found safety, for it is the rule of old and experienced miners and mine workers to seek safety or prostrating themselves, face to earth, to escape fire damp as it sweeps over them close to the roofs of rooms and entries.
      The bodies of Thomas Loomis and Henry Weitkampfer were found under the debris loosened by the force of the explosion. The searching body proceeded courageously and vigorously with their work in the hope that their comrades might be alive and that they could be removed to safety. But the death toll was exacted and lifeless bodies confronted the searchers, who removed the corpses to the cages and had the same raised to the top.
      Mr Loomis lived at No. 327 North Hamilton street and leaves a wife and family of children.
      Henry Weitkampfer lived on Willard avenue and is survived by a wife and three children. He was the son of L. L. Weitkampfer, the well known German citizen.
      The usual sensational reports were in circulation about the explosion. One story was to the effect that the pit was on fire and that probably the mine would be destroyed, but this was soon proven incorrect.
      An early report stated that two of three hundred men were imprisoned, and this, too, proved to be a canard, as the pit is in disconnected sections and such a calamity would be almost impossible.
      The truth was bad enough when completely revealed, for it carried the story of death to two families where there is weeping and wailing, while another family has an injured member to care for.
      The mine was ordered closed by the mine owners and officials and will continue closed several days until an investigation can be completed and through respect for the dead. There will not be any work until the funerals of the dead are over and the mine placed in condition again.
      The financial loss to the company cannot be figured, but it will be heavy. The caving in of the roofs of rooms and entries in a valuable part of the mine and the loss of tracks and props and coal unmined will foot up several thousand dollars.
      But worse than the financial loss is the destruction of the two lives and the injuries to others. Two families dependent upon the dead miners will appeal directly for sympathy and aid in their extremity.
                      Brief Facts of Explosion
      The explosion happened in the last right hand off main east at 8:30 o'clock.
      Two killed, Henry Weitkempfer, who lived on Willard avenue, leaves a wife and three children. He was a coal miner.
      Thomas Loomis, who lived on Hamilton street, leaves a wife and three children. He was a mine electrcian.
      John Waters, a miner, was injured, one hand being bruised and hip injured.
      John Kolar, miner, overcome br afterdamp; taken to St. Clara's hospital.
      Luke Stone, miner, was in entry near explosion; fell between car and timbers, and when explosion occurred squatted escaping the force of the explosion, which passed over his head.
      After the explosion two rescue parties were quickly organized, led by William Bresnan, mine boss and John Verderber, assistant boss.
      Work was suspended and all miners except the rescue crew were hoisted to the top.
      The rescue crews were composed of nine men each. these men entered by the air course and reached the scene in about an hour after having been checked by gas and afterdamp.
      The mangled body of Henry Weitjampfer was first found, partially buried under a fall of slate, and was taken to the top about (:30.
      The rescue worked hard and finally reached the body of Thomas Loomis, completely buried under a pile of slate, at 10:30. The body was taken to the top and, with the remains of Henry Weitkampfer, was taken in charge by Coroner Ryan.
                      Cause of Explosion
      Falling slate in a worked-out room forced gas, which is always present, into the entry and was ignited by the open lamp of one of the men who were killed. The explosion was terrific and Doctor Leonard, who accompanied the rescue party, said the men were killed instantly.
      About 12 o'clock the rescue party came to the top, after four hours of hard work, all men having been accounted for.
      Considerable damage resulted to the mine, the explosions blowing out stoppings of old rooms.
      The state mine rescue crew of Springfield was telegraphed for and arrived at 12 o'clock, having left Springfield at 10:30. The company later telegraphed for them not come. but they had already started.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
The Lincoln Herald, Lincoln, Illinois, Monday, February 3, 1913, Page 130
 
 
Grief Hovers North
      Lincoln Sunday, 2
            Die In Mine Blast

 
Two Homes Saddened By Un-
Derground Tragedy When
Lives Of Two Miners Were
Snuffed Out In Explosion

 
Injured Will Recover

 
           The Dead
Thomas Loomis, 312 North Hamilton street
Henry Weitkamper, 512 Froner avenue
 
           The Injured
John Waters, severe body bruises, hand crushed, overcome by gas.
Luke Stone, cut about the mouth.
 
 
      Sorrow prevailed Sunday in North Lincoln and grief hovered over two homes saddened by the tragedy of Saturday morning when two lives were snuffed out and two other men were injured in an explosion at the Latham mine. The bodies of Henry Weitkamper and Thomas Loomis were removed Sunday afternoon from the morgue and were taken to their homes.
      At the St. Clara's hospital John Waters is slightly improved. His body is a mass of bruises and he suffers intense pain. Luke Stone, the other miner injured, was about Saturday
   
church Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock, with burial in St. Mary's cemetery
      Services for Thomas Loomis will be held at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, either from the late home or the Christian church. Burial will be made in Union Cemetery.
      The explosion was a terrific one and shook the entire workings under the ground. Three hundred men were employed in the mine at the time and as soon as the warning came, made at once for the shaft and were hoisted to the top. The men were checked out as they reached the surface and Loomis and Weitkamper were found to be missing. On account of the smoke of the explosion, some delay was had before the scene of the explosion could be reached, but two rescue parties were made up to reach the place by two different entries. One party was led by William Bressnan, mine foreman, and the other by his assistant, John Verderber. Owing to some of the miners failing to turn in their checks at the office, it was at first reported that many others were caught in the explosion and much distress was shown by women and men gathered at the mouth of the shaft.
Buried Under Debris
      The rescue parties reached the scene of the explosion at 10:15 o'clock and came across the body of Weitkamper buried under a pile of stoppings, only his feet being exposed. The workers quickly dug the body from under the debris when a grewsome sight met their eyes, the body being horribly mangled and the right side of the face torn away.
      The body of Loomis was found about four feet away also covered with slate. The body was doubled over, apparently having been thrown against a wall and then rebounded before being buried. His skull was crushed and both men were killed instantly.
/ \ / \ / \       / \ / \ / \       / \ / \ / \
Section of article missing
\ / \ / \ /       \ / \ / \ /       \ / \ / \ /
Was in Main Entry
      The explosion occurred in one of the main entries, known as the east entry on the south side, and was three-fourths of a mile from the shaft and 270 feet under ground, and was in front of a worked out room., which had been filled with "stoppings." About twenty-five miners had passed by the place on their way to work, and Loomis, who is the electrician, had passed twice before, while repairing the trolley wire for the underground car system. Weitkamper was late to work, living a long way from the shaft, and entered the entry shortly after 8 o;clock, It is supposed that the light from his lamp found the gas which had accumulated, or the lamp from Loomis' lamp, the two men having met at that place. The explosion blew out the stoppings, under which the two men were buried.
      Timbers for some distance was torn away, but not much slate fell.
 
Send for Rescue Car
      Immediately after the explosion, when the mine was filled with hot air, following the explosion so it was impossible for the rescuers to enter the mine, the extent of the damage could not be ascertained, and it was not know whether there was fire in the mine or not, a telephone call was sent to the Mine Rescue station in Springfield for the rescue car and helmets, but it was found the car could not reach Lincoln before twelve o'clock. Before ten o'clock the mine had cleared out so the miners could go into the entry where the dead bodies were found. Fire Chief Rhoads went to the mine early after the accident, and putting on a miner's cap and jacket, went down into the mine but found the bodies had already been recovered. Chief Rhoads complimented the rescue party on their coolness displayed in the work of rescue.
 
Removed to Morgue
      The bodies were brought to the surface and removed to the office of the company and were later taken to the office of Coroner William Ryan.
 
Mine Recently Inspected
      The Latham Mine has been unfortunate in recent explosions one occurring several months ago in which a half dozen men were injured. It had been recently inspected and pronounced in good condition, and the regular mine inspector had passed through the entry a short time before the explosion occurred. The air in this portion of the mine is bad at times, although the fan is large. It will not be reopened before Tuesday, giving the company time to get the debris cleared away.
      A jury will be subpoened Saturday night to hold the inquest. Both of the dead men were respected citizens and the heads of families and much grief is shown at the unfortunate accident.
 
Thomas Loomis
      Thomas Loomis was born in Marion county, New York on October 14, 1864, and aged 48 years, 3 months
              - illegible line of text -
ed in Arkansas for several years, he being a railroad man and latter resided at Wabash, Indiana. Decedent came to Lincoln some eight years ago and is well and favorably known in local circles. He was employed for three years by the Lincoln Water and Light company, and for the past four years has been general electrician in the Latham Coal mine. he is survived by his wife and three children. James Crede, Oliver Gould and Agnes Loomis, his mother, one brother, James F. Loomis reside at Glen Falls, New York. No arrangements have been made for the funeral
 
Henry Weitkamper
      Henry Weitkamper was born in Braceville, Grundy County, Illinois, Jan. 15, 1884. When he was but a few months old his parents moved to Lincoln, where he resided all of his life. He worked as an apprentice in the Lincoln Collar Factory until he was 18 years of age, when he took up work as a coal miner. On the 7th of June, 1905, he was united in marriage to Miss May Carlyle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Carlyle. To this union, three children were born -- Catherine, Carl and Ruby. The last five years of his life Mr. Weitkamper has worked in the Latham mine, and was known as one of the best at his trade. Besides his wife and three children he is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs, Louis Weitkamper, six sisters and two brothers -- Mrs. C. W. Hoard, of Atlanta, Ga., Ms Frank Williamson, of Lincoln, Mrs. D. S. Quickel, of Anderson, Ind., Anna, Clara, Catherine, John and Frederick Weitkamper all of Lincoln.
 

 
Logan County, Illinois
Non-Fatal Casualties

July 1, 1923 - June 30, 1924 & July 1, 1925 - December 31, 1925
BENTLEY, Oris, Jr., Married, of Lincoln
13 Oct 1923 - Finger injured, coupling cars - Time lost - 65 days
 
CAMERON, James age 59 years, Married with 1 child, of Lincoln
4 Jan 1924 - Leg broken, falling slate - Time lost - 58 days
 
CAMERON, Joseph age 56 years, Married, of Lincoln
26 Jul 1923 - Side injured, shoveling - Time lost - 42 days
 
CRONEN, Pat age 54 years, Laborer, employed at the No. 2 Mine of the Brewerton Coal Co.
18 Oct 1925 - Leg broken, struck by chain - Not returned to work
 
DONAGALA, Joseph age 33 years, Married with 2 children; 3 dependents, of Lincoln
27 Sep 1923 - Eye injured, picking coal - Time lost - 34 days
 
DOUDLE, George age 59 years, Married with 1 dependent, of Lincoln
21 Sep 1923 - Hand infected, scratched on coal - Time lost - 32 days
 
GILMORE, George age 56 years, Single, of Lincoln
1 Nov 1923 - Foot injured, falling coal - Time lost - 40 days
 
GOBER, William age 19 years, Single, of Lincoln
25 Oct 1923 - Hand injured, caught in shake - Time lost - 34 days
 
HOPP, Ben L. age 34 years, Married with 1 child; 2 dependents, of Lincoln
17 Aug 1923 - Body injured, overcome by bad air - Time lost - 33 days
 
HOWATSON, Jack age 23 years, Single, of Lincoln
5 Oct 1923 - Body injured, lifting car - Time lost - 26 days
 
KEATS, John age 50 years, Miner, employed at the No. 2 Mine of the Brewerton Coal Co.
26 Nov 1925 - Pelvis broken, falling slate - Not returned to work
 
KIBURZ, Arthur age 50 years, Married with 1 dependent, of Lincoln
20 Sep 1923 - Finger cut, falling car door - Time lost - 39 days
 
KROTZ, John age 53 years, Married with 2 children; 3 dependents, of Lincoln
7 Nov 1923 - Shoulder and knee injured, falling slate - Time lost - 37 days
 
KRUSZ, Andrew age 44 years, Married with 4 children; 5 dependents, of Lincoln
18 Aug 1923 - Ankle injured, falling coal - Time lost - 36 days
 
KURTOCK, John age 24 years, Single, of Lincoln
1 Feb 1924 - Body injured, car ran over - Time lost - 81 days
 
MALONEY, Jerry age 27 years, Married with 2 children; 3 dependents, of Lincoln
5 Oct 1923 - Leg injured, kick by mule - Time lost - 33 days
 
MANN, William age 31 years, Single, of Lincoln
29 Sep 1923 - Hit by trolley pole - Time lost - 32 days
 
MOOS, Timothy age 30 years, Married with 2 children; 3 dependents, of Lincoln
18 Sep 1923 - Foot injured, loading coal - Time lost - 15 days
 
MORRIS, Orville age 20 years, Single, of Lincoln
15 Nov 1923 - Body injured, pushing car - Time lost - 35 days
 
O'LAUGHLIN. James age 50 years, Married, of Lincoln
23 Jan 1924 - Thumb injured, falling slate - Time lost - 39 days
 
O'LISKY, Vincent age 23 years, Single, of Lincoln
9 Oct 1923 - Back injured, lifting car - Time lost - 39 days
 
RETENBACKER, Carl age 30 years, Married with 2 children; 3 dependents, of Lincoln
15 Oct 1923 - Foot injured, falling coal - Time lost - 35 days
 
SHELTES, A. L. age 21 years, Single, of Lincoln
16 Nov 1923 - Body injured, between cars - Time lost - 34 days
 
SORVER, Frank age 31 years, Married with 2 children; 3 dependents, of Lincoln
22 Sep 1923 - Toe injured, pit car - Time lost - 33 days
 
SROEGER, Paul age 43 years, Married with 2 children; 3 dependents, of Lincoln
3 Oct 1923 - Feet injured, falling slate - Time lost - 33 days
 
VERDERBY, William age 24 years, Single, of Lincoln
2 Oct 1923 - Body injured, falling coal - Time lost - 32 days
 
WELSH, Daniel age 44 years, Married with 2 children; 3 dependents, of Lincoln
12 Oct 1923 - Back injured, loading slate - Time lost - 35 days
 

 
Sources :
 
1 Coal Mines in Illinois, Logan County
                Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL. 61820

2 Statistics of Coal in Illinois, 1885
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1885

3 Statistics of Coal in Illinois, 1893
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1894

4 State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal In Illinois, 1895
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer, 1896

5 State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal In Illinois, 1898
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1899

6 Eighteenth Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1899
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1909

7 Nineteenth Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1901

9 Twenty-First Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1902
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1903

10 Twenty-Second Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1903
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1904

11 Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1905

12 Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1906

13 Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1907

14 Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1908

15 Twenty-Seventh Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1908
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1909

16 Thirtieth Annual Coal Report of Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1911
                State Mining Board;       Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1912

17 Thirty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1912
                State Mining Board       Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1913

18 Thirty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1913
                State Mining Board       Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1914

19 Thirty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1914
                State Mining Board       Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1914

20 Thirty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1916
                State Mining Board       Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1916

21 Thirty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1919
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1919

22 Forty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1922
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1922

23 Forty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1923
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1923

24 Forty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1925
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois State Journal Co., Springfield, Illinois, 1926

25 Forty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1927
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1928

26 Forty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1929
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Journal Printing Co., Springfield, Illinois, 1930

27 Fiftieth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1931
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois Printing Company, Danville, 1932

28 Fifty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1933
                Department of Mines and Minerals

29 Fifty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1934
                Department of Mines and Minerals

30 Photographs, Obituries and Newpaper articles
                Courtesy of Bill Donath, President, Logan County, Illinois Genealogical & Historical Society.

 

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