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Illinois
Coal & Coal Mining
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Livingston County, Illinois

Featuring Coal Mining
 
      Livingston County is a county located in the northern part of the state of Illinois.
            40.89° N, 88.56° W

 
      Livingston County was established on February 27, 1837. It was formed from parts of McLean, LaSalle, and Iroquois counties, and named after Edward Livingston, a prominent politician who was mayor of New York City.
 
      The population was 39,678 in 2000 and 38,950 in 2010.
 
      The county seat of Livingston County, Illinois is Pontiac
 
      There are thirty townships in Livingston County :
Amity, Avoca, Belle Prairie, Broughton, Charlotte, Chatsworth, Dwight, Eppards Point, Esmen, Fayette, Forrest, Germanville, Indian Grove, Long Point, Nebraska, Nevada, Newtown, Odell, Owego, Pike, Pleasant Ridge, Pontiac, Reading, Rooks Creek, Round Grove, Saunemin, Sullivan, Sunbury, Union, Waldo,
 
      Some of the Cities, Towns, & Villages are :
Campus, Chatsworth, Cornell, Cullom, Dwight, Emington, Fairbury, Flanagan, Forrest, Long Point, Odell, Pontiac, Saunemin, Strawn, Streator*
      * Streator is a city in LaSalle and partially in Livingston counties in the U.S. state of Illinois. The city is situated on the Vermilion River approximately 81 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois in the prairie and farm land of north, central Illinois.
      Streator began with coal.
      Streator was named for Worthy S. Streator, an Ohio industrialist who financed the region's first coal mining operation. It was founded in 1868 and incorporated as a city in 1882 . Streator's early growth was due to its success as a coal producer.       Streator grew rapidly due to a number of factors: the need for coal in Chicago, the desire of European immigrants to come to America, and the investments made by East Coast capitalists willing to invest in coal operations
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Coal History Coal Mines Fatalities Sources

Livingston County, Illinois Coal History
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1878 History of Livingston County, Illinois 2
      About the year 1860, Henry L. Marsh, who owned a large tract of land near Fairbury, had his attention called to the fact that the rapidly increasing population must necessarily require a more abundant supply and a cheaper fuel. There was not timber enough in the county to supply it for ten years, at the rate it was being consumed ; and, from his knowledge of coal formation. Marsh believed that it could here be obtained, by going to a sufficient depth. At that day, coal mining, by deep, perpendicular shafts, was unknown in this bituminous district. La Salle, Peoria and Morris were sending out the few tons they were called upon to supply, and Coalville supplied a meager local trade.
 
      The Wilmington coal fields were not yet discovered, and Streator, which now, from its various shafts, sends up its thousands of tons per day, was unknown to the worthy man whose name it bears; and for a decade after Marsh's pioneer labors, the place was known only by the name of " Hardscrabble."
 
      To a man of less force, will-power and energy than Marsh, the idea of mining coal on the open prairie of Livingston County would have remained an idea, or it might have grown into a desire; but he was made of the right material to push a gigantic enterprise to completion. He at once set about an investigation of the facts in the case, and, under his investigation, the possibilities steadily grew into a reality. The story of his struggles with adverse fortune, his heavy losses, his trials and failures, and his final success, would make an interesting and instructive chapter of history. Water, at various depths, so flooded his work and damaged it in various ways, that his friends and backers deemed the scheme impracticable; but he was not discouraged, and, in the last extremity, he completed an invention of his own, by which the difficulty was overcome. At adepth of 180 feet, he struck a paying vein of excellent coal. The success attending Marsh's efforts incited others to like enterprises, and, in 1865, a shaftwas sunk at Pontiac, another shaft at Fairbury in 1808, one near Streator in1872, one at Cornell in 1875, and one at Cayuga in 1878. Cayuga, which is distant five miles from the river, is, thus far, the farthest point from the Vermilion at which a paying vein of coal has been reached in the county. The efforts to find coal at Odell and Dwight have thus far proved failures. The mining at Coalville is carried on by horizontal entries, and is not so expensive to the operators. The capital invested in coal mining in Livingston will not fall short of a quarter of a million dollars, and, thus far, the enterprise has proved far more profitable to purchasers than to the proprietors of the mines.
 
      The first coal was raised at Pontiac January 12, 1866 ; the first lump taken from the shaft being now in the possession of Jacob Streamer, with that date attached. The shaft was sunk on contract for the Directors of the company, by Isaac Custer. This work, with the buildings, cost the company $10,000. The shaft was sunk to the depth of 253 feet, but a vein at 175 feet is the only one worked to advantage. The charter members of the company were: S. C. Crane, President; J. Duff, John Dehuer and Thomas Wing, Directors. The enterprise has not, on the whole, been very successful. Over $100,000 has been spent, and owing to fires and other misfortunes, it has scarcely in its history been on a paying basis. In February of 1871, the shaft and all of its interests were sold to Messrs. Franz, Campbell & Bullock, of Woodford County, for $45,000. It is now under control of W. H. Levers, who has operated it for several years past. Statistics in regard to its present workings are not obtainable, and are necessarily omitted.
 
      The Chicago & Paducah Railroad, at first called the Fairbury, Pontiac & Northwestern Railroad, was built through this part of the county in 1871. The city of Pontiac and township took a lively interest in procuring its location through this part of the county, and voted the company a donation of $50,000 to effect the purpose. While some may doubt whether the interests of the city have been enhanced by the location of a second railroad at this point, it will hardly be disputed that the farming community has been greatly benefited. Much has been saved in the way of freights, as by means of this line, competition has produced lower rates than otherwise would have prevailed. Small towns have sprung up along the line, and, while they have taken some trade from Pontiac, they have proved to be a great convenience to the sections in the midst of which they have been located.
 
      As early as 1862, movements were made here toward developing the coalfields, believed to exist sufficiently near the surface to be reached with light expense. In the Fall of this year, H. L. Marsh commenced to sink the west shaft, and at the distance of 216 feet, struck the first vein of coal, which varies from four and a half to five feet in thickness, and produces a very fair quality of coal. At a distance of 180 feet below this vein another was found, but not of sufficient thickness to warrant its being profitably worked. It is the best coal, however, in any of the neighboring shafts, but,to quote the slang of the day, it is "too thin"-- to be valuable to quote the slang of the day, it is "too thin"-- to be valuable. found in large quantities, and which is supposed to contain mineral properties that may be converted into something valuable. This vein, or bed of stone,was found at a depth of about eighty feet, and is seven feet in thickness. To sink this shaft and equip it for work has cost altogether about $30,000 ; the works have a capacity for taking out at least five hundred tons daily, but the demand has never required it to run to the full extent of its ability. Some years ago, it passed into the hands of Eastern capitalists, who leased it to Knight & Gibb, of Fairbury, for two and a half years, which term, we believe, has expired, and the mine is at present idle, except in keeping the water pumped out. This was the first shaft sunk between Braidwood and Alton, where more than a hundred now perforate the ground. It for some time proved an expensive affair on account of so much water, and the third shaft was sunk before one could be secured against overflow.
 
      The east shaft was commenced in April, 1867, and struck a profitable vein of coal at a depth of one hundred and sixty feet. This shaft was originally begun by a stock company, consisting of Jones, Amsbury, Darnall, Gribb, Atkins and Archer. Amsbury and Jones were the principal business men, and Gibb the Superintendent. The sinking of the shaft at that time cost about $15,000, but could be done for, perhaps, half the amount now. A few years after the opening of the shaft, Gibb leased it from the company, and has been operating it advantageously for the past four years. Mr. Gibb is a native of Scotland, and has been in this country since 1852. He thoroughly understands coal mining, and under his supervision this shaft yields on an average seventy-five tons daily, the year round. At present, they supply the railroad companies 1,000 tons per month, while the remainder is mostly disposed of to the local trade. The different formations passed through in reaching coal were yellow clay immediately after the soil, then quite a thickness of blue clay, after which a considerable stratum of soft stone -- usually called soapstone -- and then a vein of lime rock, followed by a shelly sandstone, with thin layers of sand between the layers of rock, when coal was struck. A peculiarity of the country here is the difference in the formations passed through in these shafts, which are not more than two miles apart. In the west end shaft, the clay is about the same as in the other, but much more water; after passing through the clay, two strata of lime ledges were met with ; then a stratum of red fire-clay, and after it about eighty feet of shelly lime rock, followed by thirty feet of soapstone, underlying which was the first vein of coal. In the new shaft, sunk the present season, about midway between the other two. a very soft, red rock was found in large quantities, and which is supposed to contain mineral properties that may be converted into something valuable. This vein, or bed of stone, was found at a depth of about eighty feet, and is seven feet in thickness. Speaking of it at the time, the Independent Blade said :
The stone is strongly impregnated with mineral, mostly iron In color it is gray and dark brown. It also has an oily substance, that shows itself very plainly when immersed in water, the oil rising to the surface. Experiments have been made with this stone ground to powder and mixed with oil for painting purposes, and to all appearances it makes an excellent article. We have samples of this paint in this office, which may be seen. Further tests will be made, and should it turn out as is now anticipated, there is a mine of wealth in it, and the manufacture of mineral paint may be commenced at once in this city.
      This shaft is owned by Knight, Gibb & Co. They bought six acres of Mr.Marsh, with the privilege of mining under seventy acres more, belonging to the same party. They reached coal -- a vein four and a half feet thick -- at a depth of 176 feet, and at an expenditure of about $10,000. This is the third shaft that has been successfully sunk in the environs of Fairbury, and, next to grain, coal mining is the most extensive line of business engaged in by its citizens. Aside from the amount furnished the railroads, the trade is of a local character, mostly, and very extensive of that kind.
 
The Village of Chatsworth
      A coal shaft was sunk near the village of Chatsworth, in 1867, by Capt. Beard, who had some connection at one time with the east shaft at Fairbury. A stock company was formed among the citizens of Chatsworth, of $10,000, but the stock was never all paid up. Enough, however, was collected to pay Beard for sinking the shaft, which was about 218 feet deep. The works were finally abandoned, upon the report of Beard that there was no prospect of coal. It is thought by some that a good vein of coal was found, but for some reason the fact was concealed, or at least never officially reported. One of the men employed in the work said to some friends one day, that they passed through a vein of coal about five feet thick in sinking the Chatsworth shaft. Whether this is true or false, we are unable to say.
 
      At Vermilion City, where the Chicago, Pekin & Southwestern Railroad crosses the Vermilion River, the Vermilion Coal Company have sunk shafts from which immense quantities of the article are taken. The Western Division of the Chicago & Alton Railroad crosses the township from east to west, giving the township a direct outlet to Chicago by way of Dwight. The Chicago, Pekin & Southwestern Railroad traverses a small portion of the northwestern corner, and the Chicago & Paducah passes through the town from northwest to southeast.
 
      The stations on the several roads in this township are Smithdale. on the Chicago & Alton; Collins, on the Chicago & Paducah; and Vermilion City, on the Chicago, Pekin & Southwestern.
 
Vermilion City
      This is simply a settlement made by the miners about the Vermilion Coal Co.'s works, on the Chicago, Pekin & Southwestern Railroad, at the crossingof the Vermilion River, a mile southwest of Streator. A plat of the place was made by A. C. Huetson, for J. M. Walker, President, and A. T. Hall, Secretary, of the Chicago, Wilmington & Vermilion Coal Company. The plat consists of fifty-one acres, from Section 2, Township 30, Range 3. In the record of the plat, the right of mining all coal beneath the land is reserved. The town consists of forty or fifty miners and other employees of the Company, a few of whom have families.
 
Village of Coalville
      This is a little town, laid out by L. H. Mallery, October 6, 1865, near the coalbeds, on Section 2. The town is occupied almost wholly by parties interested in the mining of the coal, of which immense quantities are taken out here. As much as 2,000 tons are mined per year; and before the works at Streator were established, more than double this amount was mined. The mines are owned by L. H. Mallery and others, who allow them to be worked by other parties, who pay the proprietors a percentage of the products.
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Extract from :
Biography in Black, a History of Streator, Illinois 3
      One of the first to mine coal for other than his own consumption was Francis Murphy, who began operations in 1851 near the present terminus of Court Street. Other small mines, called "drifts," were opened into the bluff along the east bank of the river at the foot of the present Hickory Street. It is said that the river and creeks used to run a golden yellow because of the sulphur water pumped into them from the mines along their banks. The coal, hoisted by horsepower to the top of the hill, was loaded into farm wagons for delivery,

Livingston County, Illinois Coal Mines

Baiett & Talbot Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 4 East, Section 18
Strip Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Baiett & Talbot Coal Mine No. 3   Baiett & Talbot Coal Company   1939 - 1940
[Source - No. 1, Index 2745]

Baitt & Talbot Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Strip Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Baitt & Talbot Coal Mine   Baitt & Talbot Coal Company   1945 - 1957
[Source - No. 1, Index 2724]

Barackman Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Barkman Coal Mine   J. Barkman   1881 - 1882
Williams Coal Mine   Thomas Williams   1882 - 1883
Williams Coal Mine   John Williams   1883 - 1884
Barackman Coal Mine   M. J. Barackman   1884 - 1890
Barrackman Coal Mine   Barrackman & Son   1890 - 1895
Barackman Coal Mine   Barackman Coal Company   1895 - 1897
[Source - No. 1, Index 2731]
 
1896 Annual Coal Report 10
Labor Troubles.
      On May 18 the miners employed at the Barrackman Coal Company's mine went out on a strike because the company refused to credit the miners with the full weight of their pit cars. When a car weighed, say 48 pounds over the hundred pounds the odd pounds were not given to the miner. After the miners were idle two weeks the company agreed to credit them with the weight of all coal passing over the screens.
 
1897 Annual Coal Report 11
Abandoned Mines.
      Livingston County -- The Barrackman Coal Company has abandoned its mine at Coalville.
 
1899 Annual Coal Report 13
Abandoned Mines.
      A. M. Barackman has abandoned his mine at Coalville, Livingston county, and purchased the mine formerly operated by Oscar Kimes, of the same place. He has put in a switch from the Santa Fe railroad to the mine, and has also erected a new tower, put in a pair of hoisting engines and a fan, and now has the mine in first class condition.

Bargreen Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Bargreen Coal Mine   Bargreen Brothers   1899 - 1900
[Source - No. 1, Index 7052]

Barr Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Barr Coal Mine   Barr Clay Company   1914 - 1921
[Source - No. 1, Index 5748]
 
1915 Annual Coal Report 28
The following mines are classed as new mines: -- Livingston County. - Barr Clay Co., Streator.

Barr Pressed Brick Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Strip Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Barr Pressed Brick Coal Mine   Barr Pressed Brick Company   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 7050]

Barry Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 11
Strip Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Barry Coal Mine   John J. Barry   1935 - 1939
[Source - No. 1, Index 2741]

Barton & Manhattan Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County
Mine Name Operated By Years
Barton & Manhattan   Barton & Manhattan   circa 1894
[Source - 1894 Annual Coal Report 8]
1894 Annual Coal Report 8
New Mines.
      In Livingston county, local mine has been opened, : Barton & Manhattan,

Briner & Miller Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 4
Strip Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Briner & Miller Coal Mine   Briner & Miller   1937
[Source - No. 1, Index 2738]

Bruner Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 4 East, Section 6
Mine Name Operated By Years
Bruner Coal Mine   Bruner Mine   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 6424]

C., W. & V. Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
C., W. & V. Coal Mine No. 3   Chicago, Wilmington and Vermillion Coal Company   1884 - 1896
[Source - No. 1, Index 2733]
 
1885 Annual Coal Report 4
Livingston County
      Chicago, Wilmington and Vermillion Coal Co., No. 3 Shaft
This is a new mine, and appears for the first time in a report of the district. Its plan of ventilation is good. The air, after supplying each pair of entries, is taken to the upcast shaft, which is is ventilated by a fan of an entirely new pattern. This is driven by a powerful engine, with a 12 x 16 inch cylinder.
 
1890 Annual Coal Report 6
Improvement Made During The Year
      In Livingston County, the Chicago, Wilmington and Vermillion Coal Co. has put in a small electric plant, for pumping water from a depression in the workings of No. 3 mine.
 
1893 Annual Coal Report 7
Improvements
      In Livingston county the Chicago, Wilmington and Vermilion Coal Co. has sunk a shaft for water and ventilation purposes on the eastern portion of their No. 3 mine, thus shortening the travel of the air-current and greatly improving the ventilation of this part of the mine; a traveling compartment has also been made so that the miners working in this portion of the mine can reach their work with less travel than formerly.
 
1894 Annual Coal Report 8
Electricity -- The Chicago, Wilmington & Vermilion Coal Company, at its No. 3 mine. Streator, is hauling coal by electric motors, using the Sperry type, good results are obtained. Before the strike, a Thompson-Huston motor was being tried. It is quite a sight to see a motor hauling a train of cars, numbering from sixteen to twenty, with the electric flashes, in the dark, from the motor wheels and trolley. Two large dynamos furnish the power. This company experimented with the Sperry electric mining machine at its "P"' shaft, Braidwood, but finally took out the plant. from which it might be inferred it was not a success.
 
1896 Annual Coal Report 10
Abandoned Mines.
      Livingston County : The C. W. & V. Coal Company has abandoned their No. 3 mine south of Streator.

Cardiff Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 8 East, Section 22
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Cardiff Coal Mine No. 1   Cardiff Coal Company   1899 - 1903
  The Cardiff Coal Co., Cardiff, Livingston county, has opened out a new
mine about a half a mile west of the one destroyed by an explosion of gas.
Cardiff Coal Mine No. 2   Cardiff Coal Company   1903 - 1912
[Source - No. 1, Index 757]
 
1913 Annual Coal Report 26
Abandoned Mines.
      Cardiff Coal Co., Cardiff;
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1903 Annual Coal Report 17
      The Cardiff Coal Co., Cardiff, Livingston county, has opened out a new mine about a half a mile west of the one destroyed by an explosion of gas as reported below. The hoisting and escapement shafts are each 8½, by I7½ feet in the clear; both contain three compartments; two of the compartments of the escape shaft are for air, and the other for the escapement of men by a cage in the shaft in place of a stairway. The third compartment in the main shaft contains stairways as an additional means of escape. The depth of the hoisting shaft from the surface is 224 feet. The hoisting engines were built by Crawford and McCrimmon; they are first motion, each cylinder is 24 x 36 inches, with a 6-foot drum. There are four boilers, two are water tube 175 horse power each; the other two are tubular, 150 horse power each.
      Both the main and escape shaft engines are set in brick buildings, all other buildings of the plant are covered with galvanized corrugated iron, making them as near fire proof as possible. The tower will be 70 feet high, built of structural steel. The Humble detaching hook will be used on the cages and in addition thereto, there will be a device for preventing overwinding, attached to the hoisting engine. The general design for the tower and dump structure were made by George S. Rice, general superintendent of the company, and is being built by the Wisconsin Bridge Co. The fan is 7 x 14 feet, high speed, with steel plate blades, and casing, no wood whatever being used in its construction. The shaking screens are double throughout. An Ottumwa box-car loader will be placed for the outer dump track, The cages will be double decked, steel rail guides will be used in the main shaft.
      Everything in the construction of this plant is for the handling of a large output.
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Four Explosions of Gas at the Mine of the Cardiff Coal Co., Cardiff, Livingston County.
March 13, 1903
      The first explosion in the Cardiff mine, which occurred March 13, 1903, whereby three persons lost their lives, was caused by gas igniting at a gob fire in the old workings down the south slope, which had been abandoned over a year ago. This mine is situated on the Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, and the Wabash railroads, in the northeast corner of Livingston county, and is owned and operated by the Cardiff Coal company. The shaft is 240 feet deep to a 12 foot seam of coal; six feet lower there is a 3 foot seam. When the upper seam was worked out at this point, the south slope was commenced in the lower seam, and the rooms were driven at right angles to the rooms in the upper seam at the location of the gob fire in the lower seam. The strata between the two seams caved through, thus forming a chimney or draft for the fire. I received a message from Cardiff the morning of the day of the explosion to come at once, but owing to the time of trains leaving Streator, I did not arrive there until about 5 o'clock in the afternoon. Everything was right on top, the fan was running at the regular speed.
      George S. Rice, general superintendent, and Benjamin Phillips, mine examiner, went with me down the shaft. We examined very carefully the section of the mine where the explosion occurred, but could not find any indication of fire damp. We therefore came to the conclusion that men could safely go down and repair the stoppings that had been destroyed by the force of the explosion, and thus restore ventilation in the mine.
      There were 15 men in the mine when the explosion occurred, all at work building and repairing stoppings in the upper seam, intending thereby to smother the gob fire burning in the lower seam. Two of the men were working on the third southeast entry, two on the third northeast entry, two at the mouth of the south slope, and two at each of the rooms, one, two and three west of the south slope; two men were bailing water in the seventh and eighth southeast entry.
      The two men working at the third southeast entry, James Hewitt and John McClusky, were instantly killed by being thrown against the entry rib by the force of the explosion. The two men at the third northeast entry were not injured; the men working at the south slope and in rooms one, two and three, together with the night boss, were all knocked down by the force of the explosion, but none of them injured, excepting the night boss, H. M. Dodge, whose shoulders were bruised. Two of the men working on the south slope went east, the other men went west, and reached the hoisting shaft, here they met the two men from the third northeast. There were four other men missing. All the men at the hoisting shaft went in search of the two men, who were working at the south slope. They were found laying about 50 feet east of the south slope, having been overcome by the after damp. James Barra, miner, was dead, and the miner with him was unconscious, but was soon revived after being taken to the fresh air.
      By this time the night engineer had given a general alarm; Thomas Roberts, mine manager, soon had a rescuing party at the mine. The party descended the escapement shaft, (there had been a cage connected with this shaft;) they found ten men near the hoisting shaft and near the mule stable. It may be well to state here that at this time a part of the hoisting engine was broken, and had not been repaired. After the explosion the men were taken out of the mine, while others of the rescuing party made further search for the missing men. The bodies of Hewitt and McCusky were found at the third southeast, both were dead. They were conveyed to their homes. The rescuing party made further search for the two water bailers; when the party reached the fifth southeast they were forced to return, for the reason that the ventilation had been cut off. The men began at once erecting temporary stoppings between the intake and the return airways, and soon had the ventilation established. It was now about 9 a. m.; the two missing men, water bailers, came down the main east entry and went out at the escape shaft.
      At the time of the explosion, midnight, these two water bailers were eating supper on the fifth east parting; a cloud of dust came to the parting, and they had to retreat to the eighth southeast entry, although the air was cut off from them. They were also cut off from the after damp; they made several attempts to go out during the night and about 9:00 o'clock, as stated, they succeeded in getting out; the mule they had been working was found dead on the parting. The next day, Saturday the 14th, in the afternoon, in company with Mr. Phillips, mine examiner, I made a thorough examination of the mine. We especially examined the south slope to the third southeast where the explosion took place, but could not find any indication of fire damp. At this time men were working in the mine, repairing stoppings so as to establish ventilation, and also to close up the old workings.
 
March 15, 1903
      The second explosion occurred Sunday evening, March 15, about 5:20 o'clock. Six men were in the mine at the time, building and repairing stoppings.
      W. H. Parker, superintendent, and Thomas Roberts, mine manager, with several others, volunteers, made preparations to go down the shaft; when about half way down the cage caught in the slides, owing to some broken timbers, caused by the force of the explosion. Considerable time was lost before the party reached the bottom of the shaft. William Humphreys was found alive at the bottom of the air shaft. He was taken home, and at once received medical attention. The rescuing party followed down the back entry to the south slope, where the men had been working. They found the dead bodies of Anton Hassell and Anton Jeokoski; further search was made for the other three men, but they could not be found. The party was forced to abandon the search at this time on account of the bad condition of the air.
 
March 16, 1903
      It was now getting towards morning, and the rescuers concluded to wait for my arrival at Cardiff. I arrived at the mine about 9:30 o'clock Monday, the 16th, just at the time when the third explosion was taking place. This was decidedly the most violent explosion that had occurred; the force of the explosion blew down the pulley wheels, and knocked down part of the tower at the air shaft, and also forced through the end of the engine house. A. M. Michaels, head carpenter, was struck on the breast with a piece of flying timber, injuring him seriously; he died about noon the same day.
      I concluded at once that it would be very foolish and inconsiderate, that other lives should be sacrificed, as the explosions seemed to be occurring at frequent intervals. Under these conditions, it was apparent that further effort to secure the bodies of the three men -- James Hutchinson, William Alderson and A. Wilson -- whom the rescuers had failed to find, was hopeless,and would evidently result in further loss of life. I ordered the shaft to be flooded with water. During the time occupied by the men digging the ditch, both hoisting and escapement shafts were covered over to stop the circulation of air and thereby smother the fire.
 
      At 2:37 p. m. the same day, Monday, March 16, the fourth explosion occurred, the force of which blew the covering off of both shafts. The ditch having been completed at this time, the water was let into the air shaft.
      The fifth and last explosion occurred about 7:30 p. m. the same day; about half an hour afterwards smoke was discovered coming out of the hoisting shaft. The shaft timbers had been set on fire, and all combustible material around the top works was burning.
      The engine house was completely destroyed by tire, although it was covered with corrugated iron. The heat coming out of the shaft was intense, warping the steel tower, and rendering it a total wreck.
      About 11:30 p. m., the shaft timbers having been consumed by the fire, the shaft caved in, letting in the surface around the top for a radius of about 20 feet, leaving the tower hanging at an angle of about 45 degrees. The shaft and all property was a total loss, and the mine has been abandoned.

Clayworks Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1, SW NE SE
Underground Shaft Mine.
Two veins mined - one at a depth of 80 feet with a 5½ feet coal seam and the other at a depth of 222 to 235 feet with a 2 to 2.3 feet coal seam
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Mine Name Operated By Years
Clayworks Coal Mine   Streator Clay Manufacturing Company   1895 - 1897

1896 Annual Coal Report 10
New Mines.
      Livingston County : The Streator Clay Manufacturing Company has sunk a new shaft down to seam No. 2, a depth of 222 feet. The seam is 2 feet 3 inches thick. This shaft was sunk as an escape shaft for the shaft operating seam No. 7, but the company decided to sink to seam No. 2 for the purpose of mining the five clay under the coal seam, which is of a superior quality. In sinking they passed through a seam of coal of good quality; this seam is 3 feet and 7 inches thick and was found at a depth of 130 feet from the surface. It is their intention to mine the coal of this seam for the purpose of burning the clay. The tipple and buildings are of a substantial character, and their engines are double hoisting engines, 10 x 12 geared.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Mine Name Operated By Years
Clayworks Coal Mine No. 1   Streator Clay Manufacturing Company   1892 - 1922
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
      Since production was not recorded in such a way that production in each seam can easily be determined.
This mine also extracted the fireclay below the lower seam for its manufacturing.
[Source - No. 1, Index 2725 & 3725]
 
Last Production was reported in 1922

Coalville Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Coalville Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Drift Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Coalville Coal Mine   Richard Evans   1881 - 1893
[Source - No. 1, Index 2735]
 
1895 Annual Coal Report 9
Abandoned Mines.
      In Livingston county, R. Evans has abandoned his Coalville mine near Streator.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Coalville Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Coalville Coal Mine   Coalville Coal Company   1932 - 1939
[Source - No. 1, Index 2736]
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Coalville Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Mine Name Operated By Years
Coalville Coal Mine   Coalville   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 6411]
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Coalville Coal Mine
1897 Annual Coal Report 11
Labor Troubles.
      May 24, 1897, the miners employed at the Coalville & Pontiac Coal Association's mine at Pontiac came out on strike owing to the company refusing to remove breakers from the screen. On the first of day, of this year, an agreement was made between the miners and the company, that 72½ cents per ton, of screened coal, be paid for the summer months, and 80 cents per ton of screened coal for the winter months, over the 7/8 inch screen; with the understanding that one of the breakers be removed from the screen, and the other lowered further down the screen. One of the breakers was taken off and Mr, Evans, superintendent, asked one of the miners, who had been called from the mine to work on top that day, where in his judgment, would be the proper place to set the other breaker. This man suggested lowering it four feet further down the screen, and the breaker was placed in that position. The other miners said that this man, who suggested the lowering of the breaker, had no authority to speak for them, and requested the superintendent to put the breaker back to within 18 inches of its original position; but he told them it must remain where it was. The miners claimed this was a violation of the original agreement and came out on strike.

Cope Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Cope Coal Mines
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1, SW SW SW
Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 45 to 60 feet with a coal seam of 4 to 5 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
McMan Coal Mine   George W. McMan   1881 - 1883
Cope Coal Mine   Eli Cope   1883 - 1888
[Source - No. 1, Index 2717]
Last production was reported in 1888.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Cope Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Mine Name Operated By Years
Cope Coal Mine   Cope   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 7053]

Craddock & Wehabick Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1, NE SW SW
Underground Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Craddock & Wehabick Coal Mine   Craddock & Wehabick   1919 - 1920
[Source - No. 1, Index 2721]
Last production was reported in 1920.

D. & J. Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 4 East, Section 7
Underground Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Mill Dam Coal Mine   Mill Dam Coal Company   1935 - 1940
D. & J. Coal Mine   D. & J. Coal Company   1940 - 1942
[Source - No. 1, Index 5974]

Diamond Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Diamond Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Diamond Coal Mine   Alexander Jeffery   1881 - 1882
Diamond Coal Mine   A. Jefferson   1882 - 1883
Diamond Coal Mine   Alexander Helm   1883 - 1886
[Source - No. 1, Index 2722]
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Diamond Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 28 North, Range 5 East, Section 15
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Pontiac Union Coal Mine   Pontiac Union Coal Company   1887 - 1889
Pontiac Coal Mine   Pontiac Coal Company   1889 - 1892
Smith & Hill Coal Mine   Smith & Hill Coal Company   1892 - 1894
Delgenio Coal Mine   Delgenio Coal Company   1894 - 1895
Henry Coal Mine   John T. Henry   1895 - 1896
Diamond Coal Mine   Diamond Coal Company   1895 - 1902
[Source - No. 1, Index 5957]
 
1887 Annual Coal Report 5
      The Pontiac Coal Mining Company is developing its mine and is making preparations for sinking an escapement, although the workings are not far enough in to form a communication with it at present, if it were finished.
 
1895 Annual Coal Report 9
New Mines.
      In Livingston county R. Delgenio has reopened the old Pontiac mine to the upper vein. A shaft tower has been erected preparatory to shipping coal; some coal has been taken from the mine, but at present it is shut down, except for the purpose of taking out water. It will be operated by John Henry who has a lease on the property.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
1903 Annual Coal Report 17
Prospective Mines.
      The Diamond Cooperative Coal Co., Pontiac, Livingston county, is sinking a new shaft a quarter of a mile west of the city, on the Illinois Central railroad.

Evans Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Evans Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2

Mine Name Operated By Years
Evans Coal Mine   Richard Evans   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 6413]
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Evans Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Mine Name Operated By Years
Evans Coal Mine   Evans   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 7056]
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Evans Coal Mine
1896 Annual Coal Report 10
New Mines.
      Livingston County : Richard Evans & Sons, of Pontiac, began sinking their escape shaft in the fore part of June. It is now nearing completion. This will enable the ventilation of this mine to be put in proper order.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Evans Coal Mine
1904 Annual Coal Report 18
Abandoned Mines. - Livingston County : Evans Brothers have abandoned their mine south of Streator. in Livingston county.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Evans Coal Mine
1915 Annual Coal Report 28
The following mines are classed as new mines: -- Livingston County. - Evans Coal Co., Streator.
 
1916 Annual Coal Report 29
Abandoned Mines. -- Livingston County -       Evans Coal Co.,

Fairbury Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 26 North, Range 6 East, Section 11
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Fairbury Coal Mine   Fairbury Co-op Coal Company   1886 - 1895
Fairbury Coal Mine   Co-operative Coal Company   1895 - 1909
Fairbury Coal Mine   Fairbury Miners Co-op Coal   1909- 1936
[Source - No. 1, Index 600]
 
1885 Annual Coal Report 4
Livingston County
Fairbury Coal Mining Co.
      This is a result of the combination effected between Mr. Hamilton and the Walton Brothers, whereby the old shaft of the former is closed and the entire business of the place transferred to the Walton Brothers' shaft, the capacity of which is correspondingly enhanced.
 
1887 Annual Coal Report 5
      In Livingston county the Co-operative Coal Company has completed its escapement shaft so that it is fairly within the requirements of the law.
 
1897 Annual Coal Report 11
Labor Troubles.
      April 5, 1897, the miners employed in Walton Bros, mine at Fairbury in Livingston county, were discharged and paid off. The superintendent then told the miners he was going to change the system of work in the mine, so that in the summer months when trade was dull they would not have to keep so many rooms open; and that in future he would pay $2 per day for drillers, and $2 per day for blasters, and 18 cents per ton for loading, run-of-mine; the loaders to lay their own track, set props and when a blast was not properly loosened the loader was to work it off. This is the statement of the miners. The superintendent stated, the company offered to drill and blast the coal, set up props and lay track, clean up falls of rock and take up grading. The men refused to accept these terms and remained idle, but ten men, some of them company men, started to work at the above prices and continued up to April 23, when they told the superintendent they would prefer to blast and load their own coal and accept 40 cents per ton, mine-run, $3.00 to be paid for room-turning, entry driving $1.25 per yard, $1.75 per keg for powder and 50 cents per gallon for oil. The company agreed to these prices, and the men continued at work, but only four of the original men, who were discharged, were reinstated.
 
1913 Annual Coal Report 26
Mine Fires.
      The engine and boiler house of the Fairbury Miners' Co-operative Coal Company of Fairbury, Livingston County, was destroyed by fire on the night of September 11, 1912. It was rebuilt and made fire-proof and operation resumed November 4, 1912.
 
1914 Annual Coal Report 27
Mine Fires.
      The engine house and office of the Fairbury Coal Company was destroyed by fire March 14, 1914, between 3:00 and 4:00 p. m., cause unknown. The rim of the drum was damaged and the ropes destroyed, but the engines were not damaged. The drum was repaired, new ropes were installed and work was resumed, although the engine-house was not rebuilt.
 
1915 Annual Coal Report 28
Improvements.
      The Fairbury Coal Company, Fairbury, has built a fireproof engine house in place of the one destroyed by fire, March 14, 1914.

Gall Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East
Underground Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Gall & Wargo Coal Mine   Gall & Wargo Coal Company   1935 - 1940
Gall Coal Mine   John Gall   1940 - 1941
[Source - No. 1, Index 2710]

Green Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1, NW SW SE & NE SE SW
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Kerr Coal Mine   J. D. Kerr   Unknown
Green Coal Mine   R. H. Green   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 2718]

Guyon & Liptak Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 12
Underground Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Guyon, Roth Mastho & Liptak Coal Mine   Guyon, Roth Mastho & Liptak   1934 - 1935
Guyon & Liptak Coal Mine   Guyon & Liptak   1937 - 1939
 Operated as an underground mine in 1941
Guyon & Liptak Coal Mine   Guyon & Liptak   1941
[Source - No. 1, Index 2743]

Hamilton Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Hamilton Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County
Mine Name Operated By Years
Porter, Wager, & Co. Coal Mine   Porter, Wager, & Company   Prior to 1885
Hamilton Coal Mine   H. E. Hamilton   Prior to 1885
[Source - 1885 Annual Coal Report 4]
 
1885 Annual Coal Report 4
Livingston County
H. E. Hamilton's Mine, Fairbury.
      This mine, formerly Porter, Wager, & Co.'s, has been abandoned.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Hamilton Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 11
Underground Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Hamilton Coal Mine   Dennis Hamilton   1935 - 1938
[Source - No. 1, Index 2739]

Helm Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Helm Coal Mine   Alexander Helm   1881 - 1883
[Source - No. 1, Index 5667]

Helon Coal Mine
Underground Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Helon Coal Mine   Alexander Helon   circa 1885
[Source - 1885 Annual Coal Report 4]
 
1885 Annual Coal Report 4
Livingston County
Alexander Helon's Mine.
      I was obliged to file information against the owners of this mine for refusing to make good roadways to the escapement shaft. It was nearly filled with water, so that the miners could with difficulty get through it, and it also reduced the air current by lessening the area of the air-way. He afterward built a roadway through an abandoned mine, so the suit was withdrawn.

Howe Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Underground Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Kerr Coal Mine   James D. Kerr   1883 - 1889
Howe Coal Mine   Howe Coal Company   1889 - 1890
[Source - No. 1, Index 2723]
 
1890 Annual Coal Report 6
Abandoned Mines
      In Livingston County, Howe & Co., formerly J. D. Kerns, have permanently abandoned their mine on account of the river's breaking into it. Six other small mines mentioned in county schedules have also been abandoned.

Hyduk Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1, SW SE SW
Strip Mine at a depth of 5 feet with an average coal seam of 4½ feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Hyduk Coal Mine   Hyduk Brothers Coal Company   1937 - 1939
[Source - No. 1, Index 2716]
Last production was reported in 1939.

Indian Creek Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 26 North, Range 6 East, Section 11
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Indian Creek Coal Mine   Indian Creek Coal Company   1938 - 1941
[Source - No. 1, Index 2712]

Kangley Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Two locations ?
Mine Name Operated By Years
Kangley Coal Mine   Kangley Mine   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 6416 & 6419]

Kaschak Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Kaschak Coal Mine   Thomas Kaschak   1938
[Source - No. 1, Index 2734]

Katcher, Wargo & Barry Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 12
Underground Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Wargo Coal Mine   John Wargo   1922 - 1925
Katcher, Wargo & Barry Coal Mine   Katcher, Wargo & Barry   1926
Wargo Coal Mine   John Wargo   1927
Katcher & Wargo Coal Mine   Katcher & Wargo   1928 - 1929
Katcher, Wargo & Barry Coal Mine   Katcher, Wargo & Barry   1930 - 1934
Katcher & Wargo Coal Mine   Katcher & Wargo   1935 - 1936
Katcher, Wargo & Barry Coal Mine   Katcher, Wargo & Barry   1937
[Source - No. 1, Index 2742]

Kelm Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 3
Mine Name Operated By Years
Kelm Coal Mine   Kelm   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 6444]

Kilburn Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Kilburn Coal Mine   Joseph Kilburn   1894 - 1898
[Source - No. 1, Index 2720]
 
1895 Annual Coal Report 9
New Mines.
      Joseph Kilburn has reopened his mine near the Anderson and Barr Brick Works, south of Streator, and most of the product is being used by that firm.
 
Abandoned Mines.
      Joseph Kilburn has abandoned his mine near Streator, in Livingston county.

Kimes Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Kimes Coal Mine
1894 Annual Coal Report 8
New Mines.
      In Livingston county, local mine has been opened, : Oscar Kimes
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Kimes Coal Mine
1896 Annual Coal Report 10
New Mines.
      Livingston County : Sylvester Kimes has sunk a new shaft at Coalville on land leased from Richard Evans; it is intended to supply local trade.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Kimes Coal Mine
1899 Annual Coal Report 13
Abandoned Mines.
      The Kimes Cooperative Co., opened a new mine in Coalville, but abandoned the same after operating about six months.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Kimes Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 3
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Kimes Coal Mine   Oscar Kimes   1920 - 1935
[Source - No. 1, Index 2737]
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
1899 Annual Coal Report 13
Abandoned Mines.
      A. M. Barackman has abandoned his mine at Coalville, Livingston county, and purchased the mine formerly operated by Oscar Kimes, of the same place. He has put in a switch from the Santa Fe railroad to the mine, and has also erected a new tower, put in a pair of hoisting engines and a fan, and now has the mine in first class condition.

Levers Coal Mine
Mine Name Operated By Years
Levers Coal Mine   W. H. Levers   circa 1885
[Source - 1885 Annual Coal Report 4]
 
1885 Annual Coal Report 4
Livingston County
W. H. Levers' Mine
      This mine located at Pontiac, was found running last fall, but the operators had abandoned seam No. 5 and commenced developing seam No. 2. They asked for time to sink an escapement, claiming that the new works should be construed to be a new mine, as the miners were working close to the bottom of the shaft. They put on new cages and covered them with boiler iron. The present shaft is in rather poor condition. The proprietors have been trying to organize a company to operate it, but have not succeeded as yet. The prospect is not a very promising one, the shaft being down on a fault, and an escapement being necessary. It would require quite an outlay of money with not much prospect of an adequate return. On all my visits to the place, except one in the fall, I have found it closed, and have failed to discover any one who was interested in it. I could not get any account of the production, which is small, not exceeding a few hundred tons, so I dropped it from the list.

Lillie Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Mine Name Operated By Years
Lillie Coal Mine   J. Lillie   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 6413]

Lukins & Cavanaugh Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Lukins & Cavanaugh Coal Mine   Lukins & Cavanaugh   1887 - 1894
[Source - No. 1, Index 2730]
 
1894 Annual Coal Report 8
Abandoned Mines.
      In Livingston county, the mine of Lukins & Cavanaugh has been abandoned.

Marshall Coal Mine
1893 Annual Coal Report 7
      In Livingston county, John Marshall mine was also abandoned, the coal being exhausted, located at Streator.
 
1894 Annual Coal Report 8
Abandoned Mines.       In Livingston county, the mine of John Marshall has been abandoned.
 
1895 Annual Coal Report 9
Abandoned Mines.
      John Marshall has abandoned the mine that he sunk during the year, making it both a new and an abandoned mine.
 
1896 Annual Coal Report 10
New Mines.
      Livingston County : John Marshall reopened his old shaft last year and operated with twelve men for seven months.
Abandoned Mines.
      Livingston County : John Marshall has again abandoned his mine owing to water coming in from other mines.
 

Marshall & Simpkins Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Marshall & Simpkins Coal Mine   Marshall & Simpkins   1886 - 1891
[Source - No. 1, Index 2715]

Martin Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 29 North, Range 4 East, Section 8
Strip Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Martin Coal Mine   George Martin & Company   1936
Martin Coal Mine   J. L. Martin   1936
[Source - No. 1, Index 2714]

Morris & Walker Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 26 North, Range 6 East, Section 5
Mine Name Operated By Years
Morris & Walker Coal Mine   Morris & Walker   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 2711]

Munts Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
1899 Annual Coal Report 13
Abandoned Mines.
      L. A. Munts & Sons have abandoned their mine at Streator and opened a new mine about one mile northwest of Streator, in Livingston county.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Munts Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Munts Coal Mine No. 2   Munts Brothers   1903 - 1909
[Source - No. 1, Index 6405]
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Munts Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Munts Coal Mine   Munts Brothers Coal Company   1916 - 1919
[Source - No. 1, Index 5623]

Old Slope Coal Mine
Extract from :
Biography in Black, a History of Streator, Illinois 3
 
      Colonel Plumb did come to the little town of Unionville in January 1866, with instructions to purchase and develop 4000 acres of coal lands, as acting secretary, treasurer, and resident manager of the Vermillion Coal Company. He wasted no time. Under his supervision, miners went to work and sank the shaft of the company's first mine, the "Old Slope." Located east of the river, at the foot of Adams Street and just north of Cedar, the mine reached a depth of fifty feet and eventually covered about sixty-five acres. (It never became a large operation, in its heyday employing only between fifty and a hundred men and averaging seventy tons of coal a day.)

Peters Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Peters Coal Mine   M. Peters   1881 - 1883
[Source - No. 1, Index 6409]

Phoenix Coal Mine
Phoenix Coal Mine
Photograph courtesy of Annette Liptak
Phoenix Coal Mine
N. Cornell
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 29 North, Range 4 East, Section 3, SE SW NE
Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 160 feet with an average coal seam of 3½ to 4 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Manhattan Coal Mine No. 2   Manhattan Coal Company   1903 - 1904
Phoenix Coal Mine No. 1   Phoenix Coal & Mining Company   1904 - 1907
[Source - No. 1, Index 7057]
Last production was reported in 1907.
 
1903 Annual Coal Report 17
Prospective Mines.
      The Manhattan Coal Co. of Chicago, is sinking a new shaft one mile west of Cornell, Livingston county.
 
1905 Annual Coal Report 19
Changes in Ownership.
      The Phoenix Coal & Mining Company of Chicago has purchased the mine formerly operated by the Manhattan Coal Company of Cornell, Livingston county.

Pleasant Hill Coal Mine
Mine Name Operated By Years
Pleasant Hill Coal Mine   Pleasant Hill Coal Company   circa 1890 - 1894
[Source - 1890 Annual Coal Report 6]
 
1890 Annual Coal Report 6
New Mines put in Operation during the Year
      In Livingston county, the Pleasant Hill Coal Co., about three miles south of Streator.
 
1894 Annual Coal Report 8
Abandoned Mines.       In Livingston county, the mine of Pleasant Hill Coal Company has been abandoned.

Pontiac Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Pontiac Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 28 North, Range 5 East, Section 15
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Brady Coal Mine No. 1   Brady Coal Company   1903 - 1905
Brady Coal Mine No. 2   Brady Coal Company   1905 - 1913
Murphy, Linsky & Kasher Coal Mine No. 1   Murphy, Linsky & Kasher   1913 - 1923
Pontiac Coal Mine   Pontiac Coal Mining Company   1923 - 1936
[Source - No. 1, Index 215]
 
1904 Annual Coal Report 18
New Mines.
      The Brady Coal Co.. Pontiac, Livingston county, has sunk a new shaft to No. 5 seam, one-fourth of a mile north of that city. It is located on the Illinois Central Railroad.
 
1913 Annual Coal Report 26
Abandoned Mines. --       Brady Coal Co., Pontiac.
Change of Ownership.
      Murphy, Linskey and Kasher Coal Company, of Braidwood, has purchased the Brady Coal Company's mine at Pontiac. This mine, however, was not in operation this year.
 
1914 Annual Coal Report 27
New Mines. - Livingston County. --       Murphy, Linskey, and Kasher Coal Company, Pontiac.
 
1914 Annual Coal Report 27
Improvements
      Murphy, Linskey and Kasher Coal Co., Pontiac, has installed a shaker screen at the old Brady mine.
 
1923 Annual Coal Report 32 Abandoned Mines -- Murphy, Linskey and Kasher's mine, Pontiac, Livingston County
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Pontiac Coal Mine
1904 Annual Coal Report 18
Abandoned Mines.
      The Pontiac Coal company. Pontiac, Livingston county, has abandoned its mine.

Price & Jones Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Burrell Coal Mine   William Burrell   1893 - 1897
Burrell & Reese Coal Mine   Burrell & Reese   1897 - 1898
Burrell & Massey Coal Mine   Burrell & Massey   1898 - 1900
Price & Jones Coal Mine   Price & Jones   1900 - 1901
[Source - No. 1, Index 6415]
 
1894 Annual Coal Report 8
New Mines.
      In Livingston county, local mine has been opened, : William Burrell
 
1896 Annual Coal Report 10
New Mines.
      Livingston County : William Burrell has sunk a new escape shaft at his mine south of Streator. This has made a great improvement in the ventilation of the mine.
 
1900 Annual Coal Report 14
New Mines.
      Price & Jones have leased the mine formerly operated by Burrell & Massey, in Livingston county.
 
1901 Annual Coal Report 15
Abandoned Mines.
      Price & Jones has abandoned their mine near Streator, in Livingston county.

Purington Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 12
Strip Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Purington Coal Mine   Purington Paving Brick Company   1929 - 1935
[Source - No. 1, Index 5808]

Reading Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 11
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Reading Coal Mine   Coal Run Coal Company   1881 - 1884
[Source - No. 1, Index 2740]

Renner & Roth Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 4 East, Section 7
Underground Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Renner & Roth Coal Mine   Renner & Roth   1923 - 1924
Reynolds & Roth Coal Mine   Reynolds & Roth   1924 - 1925
Renner Coal Mine   Mike Renner   1925 - 1927
Renner Coal Mine   John Renner   1928 - 1937
[Source - No. 1, Index 2744]

Riverbank Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Mine Name Operated By Years
Riverbank Coal Mine   Riverbank Coal Company   Unknown
[Source - No. 1, Index 6414]

Simpkins Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Simpkins Coal Mine   Samuel Simpkins   1891 - 1893
[Source - No. 1, Index 2728]
 
1893 Annual Coal Report 7
      In Livingston county, Samuel Simpkins' mine at Streator was abandoned on account of the river breaking into it.

Star Coal Mine
Mine Name Operated By Years
Star Coal Mine   Star Coal Company   circa 1885
[Source - 1885 Annual Coal Report 4]
 
1885 Annual Coal Report 4
Livingston County
Star Coal Co.
      The mine owned by this company has had the circuit of the air course reduced nearly one-half by getting a connection with an abandoned mine. This brings the air direct to the miners, which is a very great improvement.

Streator Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Strip Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Streator Coal Mine No. 1   Streator Drain Tile Company   1942 - 1960
Streator Coal Mine   Streator Clay Pipe Company   1960 - 1961

[Source - No. 1, Index 2727]

Vermilion Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Vermilion Coal Mine
Extract from :
Biography in Black, a History of Streator, Illinois 3
 
      In 1870 the VermillionCoal Company opened its Number 1 mine, with a shaft located just north of Grant and east of Vermillion Street. This mine, the largest in the entire Streator area, was in the thirty years of its operation to spread over about 930 acres at an average depth of 80 feet. With a vein of coal between 4½ and 5 feet thick, the mine at its peak yielded more than 2500 tons a day, to make a total of approximately 5,000,000 tons.
 
      In 1871 the Vermillion Company united with the Chicago and Wilmington Coal Company to form the Chicago, Wilmington and Vermillion Coal Company -- called simply the "Vee Cee" by local residents.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Vermilion Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 1
Underground Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
C., W. & V. Coal Mine No. 3   Chicago, Wilmington and Vermillion Coal Company   1880 - 1882
Vermilion Coal Mine No. 3   Vermillion Coal Company   1882 - 1883
[Source - No. 1, Index 2726]

West Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 26 North, Range 6 East, Section 5
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Johnson Coal Mine No. 1   Johnson Co-op Coal Company   1904 - 1905
West End Coal Mine   West End Coal Company   1905 - 1906
West End Coal Mine No. 1   Fairbury West End Coal Company   1906 - 1908
West Coal Mine No. 1   Fairbury Coal Company   1908 - 1925
West Coal Mine   William Morris   1925
[Source - No. 1, Index 216]
 
1903 Annual Coal Report 17
Prospective Mines.
      The Johnson Cooperative Coal Co. is sinking a new shaft two miles west of Fairbury on the Toledo, Peoria & Western railroad, in Livingston county.
 
1904 Annual Coal Report 18
New Mines.
      The Johnson Co-operative Coal Co., has sunk a new shaft one and a half miles west of Fairbury, Livingston county on the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad.

Wonders Coal Mines
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Wonders Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Underground Shaft Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Darm Coal Mine   C. G. Darm   1897 - 1899
Wonders Coal Mine   Harry Wonders
(? Henry Wonders)
  1899 - 1904
[Source - No. 1, Index 2732]
 
1898 Annual Coal Report 12
New Mines.
      Livingston County -- C. G. Darm has opened a new mine near Streator.
 
1899 Annual Coal Report 13
      Henry Wonders has leased the mine formerly operated by C. G. Darm, one mile south of Streator.
 
1905 Annual Coal Report 19
Abandoned Mines. - Livingston County :
      Harry Wonders has abandoned his mines near Coalville, Livingston county.
- - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -       - - - - -
Wonders Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Livingston County - Township 30 North, Range 3 East, Section 2
Drift Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Wonders Coal Mine   Henry Wonders   1937
[Source - No. 1, Index 2729]

Livingston County, Illinois Coal Mine Notes
1893 Annual Coal Report 7
      In Livingston county, Muncie & Son's mine was abandoned, the coal being exhausted, located at Streator.
 
1895 Annual Coal Report 9
New Mines.
      Harry Smock has opened a shaft south of Streator by the side of the Vermilion river.
 
1897 Annual Coal Report 11
Labor Troubles.
      May 24, 1897, the miners employed at the Coalville & Pontiac Coal Association's mine at Pontiac came out on strike owing to the company refusing to remove breakers from the screen. On the first of day, of this year, an agreement was made between the miners and the company, that 72½ cents per ton, of screened coal, be paid for the summer months, and 80 cents per ton of screened coal for the winter months, over the 7/8 inch screen; with the understanding that one of the breakers be removed from the screen, and the other lowered further down the screen. One of the breakers was taken off and Mr, Evans, superintendent, asked one of the miners, who had been called from the mine to work on top that day, where in his judgment, would be the proper place to set the other breaker. This man suggested lowering it four feet further down the screen, and the breaker was placed in that position. The other miners said that this man, who suggested the lowering of the breaker, had no authority to speak for them, and requested the superintendent to put the breaker back to within 18 inches of its original position; but he told them it must remain where it was. The miners claimed this was a violation of the original agreement and came out on strike.
 
1897 Annual Coal Report 11
Financial Difficulties.
      The Prairie Creek Coal Company, of Streator, on January 8, made an assignment to John S. Bear, of Streator. This was formerly the Coal Run Coal Company. After a suspension of two weeks a number of the miners leased the mine and resumed operations pending a settlement of the company's affairs.
 
1898 Annual Coal Report 12
Abandoned Mines.
      Livingston County --John Caswell has abandoned his mine at Coalville.
      Livingston County -- Jesse Massey & Son have abandoned their mine at South Streator.
 
New Company.
      A company of miners has been engaged for six months in sinking a shaft at Forrest, Livingston county. The shaft was sunk to the depth of 72 feet, when it was abandoned, owing to the difficult nature of the ground and the immense quantity of water encountered. The timbers were too light for the depth of the shaft, which caused a collapse and the shaft was lost.
 
1899 Annual Coal Report 13
      The Pontiac Coal Co., Poutiac, Livingston county, has abandoned the No. 2 seam; there being so many faults and slips in the coal, it would not pay to operate it, and have commenced developing seam No. 5 of the geological section.
 
Prospective Mines.
      The Campus Coal Co., has sunk a new shaft two miles north of Campus, Livingston county, on the Wabash railroad; the shaft is 255 feet deep to No. 2 seam of the geological section; the coal is 3½ feet thick. In sinking the company passed through a seam of coal 12 feet thick, 4 feet above the 3½ foot seam. At the present time the company is developing the thicker seam.
 
1900 Annual Coal Report 14
New Mines.
      Benjamin Davis has opened a new mine at Coalville, three miles south of Streator, in Livingston county.
 
      Evan Roberts has leased the mine formerly operated by A.W. Pauk & Co., two miles south of Streator, Livingston county. After operating it during the winter it was found unprofitable and abandoned.
 
1901 Annual Coal Report 15
New Mines.
      The Streator Aqueduct Company has opened a new mine near its plant, two miles south of Streator, Livingston county; the company will consume all the coal at the plant.
      Evans Bros, have opened a new mine near Streator, Livingston county.
 
1901 Annual Coal Report 15
Abandoned Mines.
      Mounts Bros., has abandoned their mine near Streator, in Livingston county.
 
1902 Annual Coal Report 16
      Alexander Anderson has leased the mine formerly operated by Benjamin Davis in Livingston county.
      J. E. Buchanan has opened out the old mine formerly operated by J. Massy & Son, Livingston county.
 
1903 Annual Coal Report 17
New Mines.
      John Westerlund has opened a new mine one mile south of Streator, Livingston county. 1903 Annual Coal Report 17
Changes of Ownership.
      Beggs, Davis & Co. have leased the mine formerly operated by Walton Bros, at Fairbury, Livingston county.
 
1904 Annual Coal Report 18
New Mines.
      Mounts Bros, have sunk a new shaft one and a half miles south of Streator, in Livingston county.
      Massey Bros, have sunk a new shaft two miles south of Streator, in Livingston county.
 
1905 Annual Coal Report 19
Abandoned Mines. - Livingston County :
      Alex Steel & Company, & John Westerlund.
      Beggs, Davis & Company have abandoned their mine at Fairbury. Livingston county.
 
1912 Annual Coal Report 25
Change of Ownership.
      Ed. Turk has purchased the mine formerly operated by W. J. McMillin & Son, Streator, Livingston County.
 
1913 Annual Coal Report 26
Abandoned Mines. --       Streator Aqueduct Co.,Streator;
 
1914 Annual Coal Report 27
New Mines. - Livingston County. --       Joseph Blank, Streator.
 
1915 Annual Coal Report 28
The following mines are classed as new mines: -- Livingston County. - McMillan & Wonders, Streator.
 
1916 Annual Coal Report 29
Abandoned Mines. -- Livingston County -
      McMillan & Wonders
      Joe Blank, Streator
 
1916 Annual Coal Report 29
Change of Name -       Oscar Kimes to Ed. Liptack & Son
 

Sources :
 
1 Coal Mines in Illinois, Livingston County
                Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL. 61820

2 The History of Livingston County, Illinois, Wm. Le Baron, Jr., & Co.; 186 Dearborn Street, Chicago; 1878
3 Biography in Black, a History of Streator, Illinois by Paula Angle; Published by Weber Company; 1962
4 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1885 -- A Supplemental Report; State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Reports of Mine Inspectors; For the Year Ended July 1, 1885
                Springfield, ILL; H. W. Roker, State Printer and Binder, 1885

5 Statistics of Coal in Illinois, 1887
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1887

6 Sixth Biennial Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of Illinois, 1890
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1891

7 Statistics of Coal in Illinois, 1893
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1894

8 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1894
                Thirteenth Annual Report ;    Springfield, ILL.; Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer, 1895

9 Statistics of Coal In Illinois 1895
                Fourteenth Annual Report;    Springfield, ILL.; ED. F. Hartman, State Printer, 1896

10 State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal In Illinois, 1896
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1897

11 Sixteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1897
                Coal in Illinois;    Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1898

12 Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1898
                Coal in Illinois       Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1899

13 Eighteenth Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1899
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1909

14 Nineteenth Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900
                A Supplemental Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1901

15 Twentieth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1901,
                also the Third Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1901, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1902

16 Twenty-first Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1902,
                also the Fourth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1902, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1903

17 Twenty-Second Annual Coal Report, Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1903
                Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1904

18 Twenty-third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904,
                also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1904, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1905

19 Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905,
                also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1905, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1906

20 Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906,
                also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1906, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1907

21 Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907,
                also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1907, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1908

22 Twenty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1908
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1909

23 Twenty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1909
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1910

24 Twenty-Ninth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1910
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1911

25 Thirty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1912
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1913

26 Thirty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1913
                State Mining Board       Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1914

27 Thirty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1914
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1914

28 Thirty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1915
                State Mining Board -- Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1915

29 Thirty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1916
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1916

30 Thirty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1917
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois State Journal Co., Springfield, Illinois, 1917

31 Thirty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1918
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois State Journal Co., Springfield, Illinois, 1918

33 Forty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1923
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1923

33 Forty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1924
                Department of Mines and Minerals       Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1924

 

Coal & Coal Mining in Illinois
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