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Illinois
Coal & Coal Mining
History & Genealogy

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Fulton County, Illinois

Featuring Coal Mining
      Gallatin County is a county located in the southern part of the State of Illinois.
            37.765° N, 88.23° W
The population in 2000 was 6,445, and in 2010 the population was 5,589.
The county seat is
      Gallatin County was organized in 1812, having been formed from Randolph County, and named for Albert Gallatin, who was Secretary of the Treasury at the time.
 
      Gallatin County has ten townships:
            Asbury, Bowlesville, Eagle Creek, Equality, Gold Hill, New Haven, North Fork, Omaha, Ridgway, Shawnee
 
      Some of the Cities, Villages and communities are :
            Bowlesville, Cottonwood, Elba, Equality, Gibsonia, Horseshoe, Junction, Kedron, Lawler, Leamington, New Haven, New Market, Old Shawneetown, Omaha, Ridgway, Saline Mines, Shawneetown
 
Coal Mines       Fatalities       History       Non-Fatal Casualties       Sources

 
Gallatin County, Illinois
Coal Mining History
Extract from Coal Mines in Illinois, Gallatin County 1
Mining in the Shawneetown Quadrangle
      The earliest mining in this area was said to have been at the Bowlesville Coal Company Mine, some time before the Civil War. The latest mining was completed in 1993 at the Peabody Coal Company's Eagle No. 2 Underground Mine). Mining in this quadrangle took place mainly in the Herrin Coal and the Springfield Coal, but some mining was also done in the Briar Hill Coal and the Davis & Dekoven Coals, with another small mine said to have mined the Gentry Coal.
Extract from 1887 History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson Counties, Illinois. 2
Bowlesville
      Bowlesville is a small town at the end of the railroad running from Shawneetown to the old Bowlesville coal mine, not now in operation. The town was the result of the operation of the mine, and inhabited mainly by miners and their families. Mr. Bowles purchased the land here in 1854 and in the same year the Western Mining Company, consisting of Mr. Bowles, Dr. Talbot and Thomas Logsdon, was formed and mining commenced. Dr. Talbot and Mr. Logsdon afterward sold out to Louisville parties, the name of the company remaining the same. Under this arrangement, however, very little coal was mined, and the land was permitted to be sold for taxes, Mr. Bowles buying it in and running it himself. When the war stopped the operations of the coal mines in Kentucky this mine had the entire demand and transacted an immense business, as many as nine steamboats being at the landing at one time, and slack selling for 10 cents per bushel and coal for 25 cents. No screening was done at that time. Mr. Bowles made a great deal of money, but died soon after the war. The property was then sold to Philadelphia parties, who, after operating the mine seven or eight years, have since let them remain idle. Bowlesville at its greatest prosperity contained one store, a grist-mill, blacksmith shop, carpenter shop, machine shop, post office and about 350 people. It now contains about fifty inhabitants. F. H. Sellers is and has been the only postmaster of the town.
The Saline Coal & Manufacturing Company,
      Not far from Bowlesville lies the property of the Saline Coal & Manufacturing Company, a company incorporated under the laws of Illinois January 28, 1851, by Albert G. Caldwell, Joseph Bowles and their associates. These gentlemen assigned their interests to Hibbard Jewett, who associated with himself Joseph G. Castles, and they were granted power to organize. In 1854 George E. Sellers became president of this company, which had among its stockholders such distinguished men as William B. Ogden, Thomas Corwin, Andrew H. Green (partner of Samuel J. Tilden), Gen. J. D. Webster, Eoscoe Conkling, M. Woodward and Joseph Alsop. The property of the company consisted of about 14,000 acres of land and included large areas of coal in Gallatin County and iron ore in Hardin County. It had a front of eighteen miles on the Saline River and it was the original design of the projector of the company to develop both minerals and establish an iron manufactory on the property, for which there would seem to be one of the finest opportunities in the country. However, from various causes, nothing of importance beyond surveying the land and boring for coal, which was found in abundance, has been done.

Gallatin County, Illinois
Coal Mines

Those with fatalities occurring in the mine.

Bowlesville Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 9 South, Range 8 East, Section 9, NE NE NE
An Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 60 feet and 181 feet with a coal seam of 3 to 5 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Bowlesville Coal Mine   Bowlesville Mining Company   prior to 1879 - 1883
Bowlesville Coal Mine   Bowlesville Coal Company   1887 - 1892
This mine may have also operated as the Western Mining Company.
The last production was reported in 1892.
[Source - No. 1, Index 4163 ]
 
      This company was begun by Joseph Bowles, in what was to become Bowlesville, along with Thomas Logsdon and Dr. Tolbert. Because of its proximity, this mine competed with Kentucky mines until the Civil War, when it began to make a profit. With the closing of the Union Naval yards, demand decreased, and the mine eventually closed.

Eagle Underground Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 10 South, Range 9 East, Section 8, NE SW NE
An Underground Mine at a depth of 40 feet with an average coal seam of 4½ feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Eagle Underground Coal Mine   Peabody Coal Company   1967 - 1974
The last production was reported in February 1974.
[Source - No. 1, Index 884 ]

Eagle No. 2 Underground Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 9 South, Range 9 East, Section 21, NW NE NE
An Underground Mine at a depth of 180 to 400 feet with a coal seam of 3½ to 5.6 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Gold Hill Coal Mine No. 90   Peabody Coal Company   1967 - 1968
Eagle No. 2 Underground Coal Mine   Peabody Coal Company   1969 - 1993
The last production was reported in 1993.
[Source - No. 1, Index 898 ]

Eagle Surface Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 9 South, Range 8 East, Section 23, SW NE NW
A Surface (Strip) Mine at a depth of 6 to 80 feet with a coal seam of 2½ to 4.67 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Equality Coal Mine   Equality Coal Company   1945
Idle       1946 - 1965
Eagle Surface Coal Mine   Peabody Coal Company   1966 - 1980

The last production was reported in May 1980.
[Source - No. 1, Index 883 ]

Hickory Hill Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 9 South, Range 8 East, Section 14, SE SW SE
An Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 47 feet with an average coal seam of 4½ feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Hickory Hill Coal Mine   Logan Highway Coal Company   1929 - 1941
The last production was reported in 1941.
[Source - No. 1, Index 648 ]

Hickory Hill Coal Mine
New Hickory Hill Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 10 South, Range 8 East, Section 24, SW NE NE
A Slope Mine.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Hickory Hill Coal Mine   Hickory Hill Coal Company   1941 - 1946

      This mine was also known as New Hickory Hill Mine to distinguish this mine from Logan Highway Coal Company's Hickory Hill Mine (Index No. 648), which closed in 1941.
      This mine changed ownership in 1943 but continued to operate under the same name.
      The last production was reported in 1946.
[Source - No. 1, Index 2270 ]

Illinois Saline Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 9 South, Range 8 East,
      Old Shaft - Section 20, NW NW NW
      New Shaft - Section 18, NE SE SE
Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 60 feet in the old shaft and 90 to 98 feet in the new shaft; with a coal seam of 4.67 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Equality Coal Mine   Equality Coal Company   1882 - 1883
Equality Coal Mine   Cassells, Temple & Company   1883 - 1884
Idle   Idle   1885 - 1887
Equality Coal Mine   Equality Coal Company   1887 - 1900
Equality Coal Mine   Hugh Murray   1900 - 1902
Equality Coal Mine   Gallatin Coal & Coke Company   1902 - 1913
Idle   Gallatin Coal & Coke Company   1914 - 1915
Equality Coal Mine The mine flooded in the spring of 1913,
destroying the old shaft and all the mine equipment.
Idle because of flooding and subsequent damage to the mine.
A new shaft was constructed.

See : Mine Destroyed at Equality
Northern Coal Mine No. 4   Northern Coal Company   1916 - 1917
West Side Coal Mine   Gallatin Coal & Coke Company   1917 - 1925
  Idle in 1922, 1924 &1925
West Side Coal Mine   Equality Coal Company   1926
Saline Gas Coal Mine No. 4   Saline Gas Coal Company   1927 - 1929
Illinois Saline Coal Mine   Illinois Saline Coal Company   1930

 
Construction of the new shaft was begun in November 1913, but production was delayed until late 1915.
The last production was reported in December 1930.
[Source - No. 1, Index 47 ]
 
Mine Destroyed at Equality
Extract from 1913 Annual Coal Report 6
 
      The mine of the Gallatin Coal and Coke Company was completely destroyed by the floods of last April. The water filling it on April 6th, and being followed by a series of outbursts that completely wrecked the entire plant.
 
      This mine is one of the old operations of the State, having been sunk in 1882. It has never been operated on a large scale, 600 tons having been its greatest capacity. Altogether there has been taken out a little more than 200 acres of coal of the No. 5 seam, which is about 5 feet thick at this place.
 
      The opening to this mine, which is a shaft 90 feet deep, was on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, just at the west corporate line of the city of Equality, and about a 1,000 feet from the Saline River.
 
      On driving the opening entries of the mine it was found that apparently the coal went to the outcrop to the east, and as the river was on the north it was not thought advisable to work in that direction, consequently the mine was all worked from one side, namely, the north, with cross entries leading to the east and west entries. The works extend north about one mile and were about a half mile in extent east and west at the greatest distance.
 
      The level of the mouth of the shaft was about 1 foot above the 1884 flood, which was the greatest ever known in this part of the State and which was thought would never be equaled again.
 
      About March 28 it was pretty well known that all previous water records would be broken here so they began to make efforts to protect the mine. They had a large crew of men dig trenches down to the clay and fill them with moist clay, tamping it in. Above the level of the surface they had a heavy timber retaining wall built on either side of this trench 6 feet apart, filling in between with clay and tamping it in. By April 1 the mine was surrounded by water and it became necessary to boat all material for the building of these levies a distance of several hundred feet.
 
      April 2 the cribbing in the shaft gave way on the east side at a point about 20 feet below the surface, letting in considerable water and carrying away a part of the levee. They made renewed efforts, and with the assistance of the citizens who turned out almost to a man and did splendid work, they succeeded in getting this break stopped. On the morning of April 3, the cribbing in the shaft, which was old, gave way on the west side just above the rock, which is about 28 feet below the surface. This caused what had been an old slip to give way, taking into the shaft the levee on this side and with it the surface to a distance of 10 or 12 feet west of the mouth of the shaft. Again everybody responded, and again after untiring and heroic efforts on the part of the entire citizenship, they succeeded in stopping this break. It seemed for the next two days that the only effort needed was to keep their dykes above the rise of the water, which was a very difficult task now on account of them being more than 300 feet long, and having to handle all material in small boats. They secured bags of sand and succeeded in keeping above the water by dint of great effort. Sunday morning, April 6, when the water was almost at its greatest height, they began to feel that they could and would succeed in keeping it out, when it was discovered that a very small stream was running in through the clay from the south side at a depth of possibly 10 feet below the surface of the water. They began strengthening the dykes on this side with sand bags, but before a great while they could see that this little stream was increasing in size. It steadily grew larger until 9:28 a.m. with a mighty inrush of what looked like the entire river, the water broke through under the levee, carrying it and everything for a hundred yards around into the shaft. The velocity of the water was so great that it carried pit cars and other objects that were near the pit head into the mine, and the suction pulled the end out of the engine and boiler room and the blacksmith shop.
 
      In an hour and twenty-two minutes after the water had began running into the mine it completely filled the shaft, thereby trapping in all the air that was in the mine. The mine goes to the dip in all directions, being 13 feet lower at the air shaft than at the hoisting shaft and 48 feet lower in some of the northeast entries than at the main shaft. After the water had filled the opening at the main shaft and had filled the mine until the air could not escape at the air shaft, it continued to run in for five hours, all the time compressing the air that was behind it and trapping in more as the pressure and weight of water increased. At 3:50 in the afternoon of the 6th, after the water had been compressing the air for five hours, the air rebounded with a force that was almost beyond comprehension. It threw out mine cars, cages, huge concrete blocks, sheave wheels, engines and completely destroyed the entire top works. Water, stone, dirt, and machinery were thrown into the air to an estimated height of 500 feet. The sheave wheels, which had gone down the shaft together with the headframe, were blown out and fell over a hundred yards from the pit head, completely burying themselves in the hard earth.
 
      Twenty-two minutes after the first outburst, a second one came, and, eight minutes after, was followed by a third, either of which were considerable less force than the first. The second outburst threw water to a height of possibly 150 feet, and a picture was made of it while in action by one of the local photographers. The third outburst, which rose to a height of probably 75 feet, was followed by numerous others, each in turn growing less and less until they were only huge air bubbles. This bubbling continued for more than a week before the mine finally filled. The shaft now stands to within 2 feet of the level of the surface and presents the appearance of an old well caved in around the top until it is about 40 feet across.
Old Mine Re-opened.
Extract from 1914 Annual Coal Report 7
 
      The shaft of the Gallatin County Coal & Coke Company, of Equality, which was completely destroyed by the floods in April, . 1913, is being re-opened.
 
      A study of the mine maps led the company's engineers to believe that they would be able to put down a new shaft at a point where they would reach the solid coal adjacent to the old works, and a site was selected with this in view. As all the equipment of the old shaft has been destroyed, new had to be provided before the pumping operations could be commenced. The only point at which pumping was possible was at the old air shaft, and it was so small that pumps could not be lowered and hence, the only available method was by deep well outfit on the surface. Sinking and pumping began in November, 1913, and the hoisting shaft reached the coal December 14, 1913, and connection was made with the old works and the shaft was flooded to the level of the water. Pumping was continued at both the air and the new hoisting shaft and the mine was dewatered about the last of April. The shaft was then opened and the landings made and the making of entries, airways and roads connecting with the workings of the old shaft is now in progress.
 
      The hoisting shaft is elliptical in shape with four divisions, two for hoists and the others for pumping, pipes, air and manways. The shaft is strictly fireproof, the upper 60 feet above the solid rock is lined with reinforced concrete. The tipple and head-frame is entirely of steel; it is a four-track tipple with shaking screens and provision made for all grades of coal now furnished the Illinois trade. Hoisting engines are 24 by 36 first motion; all cages are very heavy and entirely of steel excepting the platforms.
 
      The power plant will consist of three 150 H. P. boilers, two of which are now placed; boiler-house is of steel frame construction with steel roof; power-house is of brick with steel roof; machine-shop is corrugated steel with light wood wall frame with steel truss and purlins and roof. In fact the whole plant is of strictly fireproof construction.
 
      The coal will be mined by compressed air puncher machines, air compression machinery and accessories are already purchased and on the ground. Haulage will be by gasoline motor.
 
      The water supply for boiler and mines is furnished by drainage reservoir 1,200 feet away and water is pumped by gas engine to settling basin and standpipe at shaft.
 
      The old air shaft has been concrete lined from surface to solid material and has steel head-frame.
 
      The ventilating fan is 11 feet in diameter and upper half is cased with steel and lower half with concrete; no timber whatever is used in construction of the ventilating system and the fan is driven by gasoline engine.
 
      The shaft and plant will be lighted with a 400 light electric system.
 
      The powder magazine is located 1,200 feet from the shaft with low hill barrier between, and the construction of the magazine is in accordance with latest practice and is strictly fireproof, foundation and roof being of concrete and the walls of brick.
 
      The railroad in connection with the mine has four loading tracks under the tipple, and storage for 40 empties and for from 40 to 50 loads is provided. The capacity of the mine will be 1,000 tons per day.
 
      Provision has been made to install a new coke plant at a later date should the condition of the coke market warrant it, the Equality coal being known to make a fine grade of coke for zinc, lead, and copper smelting.

 
Martin Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Junction
A Slope Mine at a depth of 20 feet with an average coal seam of 5 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Jones & Martin Coal Mine   Jones & Martin   1916 - 1917
Jones Coal Mine   Sam Jones   1917 - 1918
Wallace, Martin & Jones Coal Mine   Wallace, Martin & Jones   1918 - 1919
Wallace & Martin Coal Mine   Wallace & Martin   1919 - 1923
Martin & Jones Coal Mine   Martin & Jones   1923 - 1924
Wallace & Martin Coal Mine   Wallace & Martin   1924 - 1927
Martin Coal Mine   J. C. Martin   1928
This mine was idle in 1922, 1923 & 1927 [Source - No. 1 ]

 
Mid City Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 9 South, Range 8 East, Section 13, NW SE SE
An Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 95 feet with a coal seam of 4½ to 5½ feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Mid City Coal Mine No. 1   Mid City Coal Company   1930 - 1940
Shawnee Coal Mine   Shawnee Coal Company   1940
New Shawnee Coal Mine   New Shawnee Coal Company   1941 - 1942
Gallatin County Coal Mine   Gallatin County Coal Company   1943 - 1947
B & W Coal Mine No. 1   B & W Coal Company   1947 - 1965
Mid City Coal Mine   Mid City Coal Company, Inc.   1966 - 1967

The last production reported was in 1965.
This mine operated from March 1966 to April 1967, but production was not reported.
[Source - No. 1, Index 691 ]

 
Saline River Coal Mine
The legal description lists this as :    Gallatin County - Township 9 South, Range 8 East, Section 23, SW NE NW
An Underground Shaft Mine at a depth of 40 feet with a coal seam of 4.17 to 4.83 feet in thickness.
Mine Name Operated By Years
Dempsey Coal Mine   Dempsey Coal Company   circa January 1893
Dempsey Coal Mine   J. E. Dempsey   1905 - 1908
Hickory Hill Coal Mine No. 1   Hickory Hill Coal Company   1908 - 1924
Saline Creek Coal Mine   Saline Creek Coal Company   1924 - 1925
Saline River Coal Mine   Saline River Coal Company   1926 - 1927
      Property title records indicate Dempsey Coal Company was operating as early as January 1893 at this location. No production reported.
      The ownership has also been listed as Dempsey Brothers.
      This mine was idle in 1924.
      The last production was reported in March 1927.
[Source - No. 1, Index 135 ]

 
Gallatin County, Illinois
Coal Mine
Fatalities
BAKER
June 4, 197016, Mr. Raymond L. Baker, Eldorado, age 39, married, 3 dependent children came to his death at 10:45 p.m. on June 4, 1970 from injuries sustained in an accident that occurred on the second shift at 9:40 p.m. of the Peabody Coal Co., Eagle Mine No. 1 , Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois while he was in the performance of his duties as a Joy Operator.
      Mr. Baker, a loading machine operator, had finished loading the No. 37 room in the 7th South Panel off the Main East. He had started moving the Joy loading machine to the other end or to the No. 31 room. The roof bolter was bolting the crosscut between the No. 36 and No. 37 rooms. Mr. Baker was moving through the No. 36 room, and Mr. Ralph Maggard, the roof bolter on the left side was putting the last pin in the crosscut. As Mr. Baker started through the No. 36 room with the pinner still working in the crosscut off the No. 36 room, Mr. Donald Davis, the roof bolter standing next to the tail of the bolter was holding the cable up, while Mr. James Williams, the Joy helper, was holding it up next to the rib off of the No. 36 room. The room at this point was 20 feet wide and the crosscut 18 feet wide, however, this space was cut to 11 feet 3 inches, due to the presence of the roof bolter. The right rib also had an overhang ranging from 8 inches at the center of the coal seam to 2 feet, 8 inches at the top. Mr. Baker was caught between the right rib of the No. 36 room and pulled loose from the controller on to the tram motor approximately 5 feet back from the controller of the machine. The loading machine continued moving without anyone at the controls until Mr. James Williams, the Joy helper, reached the controls and stopped the machine as it came up past the rib. Mr. Baker was put on a stretcher and sent to the Doctors Hospital at Harrisburg, Illinois, where he was pronounced dead on arrival at 1 0:45 p.m. June 4, 1 970.
 
BARNARD
November 25, 193813, Jerry Junior Barnard, of Eldorado, loader, aged 23 years, single killed by fall of rock in mine No. 1 of the Logan Highway Coal Co. No dependents.
 
BORUM
April 27, 197016, Mr. Harry K. Borum, Eldorado, age 26, married, 1 dependent child, came to his death at about the hour of 2:25 p.m. on the first shift of April 27, 1970 at the Peabody Coal Co., Eagle Mine No. 1, Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois while in the performance of his duties as a laborer when he came in contact with an electric cable. He had been employed at this mine, 1 year 4 months, and 19 days.
      Mr. Borum, a laborer, was fatally injured by an electrical shock he received while handling a 440 volt, three phase four conductor cable, size 10-4, taking power from the distribution box to the battery charger. He was working at the loading station in the 3rd North, off the Main East. The shuttle car driver, Mr. Sam Witherspoon, had stopped his shuttle car to hang the cables which were lying on the 3rd North roadway, 22 feet from the loading station. Mr. Borum told him to come ahead and that he would take care of the cables. Mr. Borum put the cables in the middle hanger and stepped clear of the shuttle car as it came by him, holding the cables up as Mr. Witherspoon drove on to the loading station. Mr. Borum had put the cables into the second hanger at the edge of the roadway, and was holding on to the cables trying to get them in the next hanger, when his left hand came in contact with a bare conductor, fifteen or sixteen inches long on the battery charger cables. Ten minutes prior to the accident it was observed by the repairman, Mr. John Tucker, that Mr. Borum's shoes were wet and his clothes dripping with perspiration.
      There is no doubt that Mr. Borum's back was against the roof, and his other hand touching a roof bolt plate; thereby Mr. Borum served as a direct ground to the power being carried on one conductor of a three phase cable. Mr. Borum cried out as Mr. Whitherspoon had started to unload the shuttle car. Mr. Cecil Newcom, the foreman, came from the 4th North and pulled Mr. Borum loose from the power while Mr. Sam Witherspoon ran to the power distribution box to pull the power. Mr. Borum was given mouth to mouth resuscitation, and a Pneolator Resuscitator was put on him as he was being taken out of the mine. He was taken to the Ferrell Hospital at Eldorado and pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Denton Ferrell.
 
BURTON
July 8, 19188, John Burton, of Kentucky, miner, age 46 years, married, was killed by a fall of rock in Hickory Hill Coal Company's mine, Junction. He leaves a widow and four children.
 
CLAYTON
December 23, 196715, Mr. Loren M. Clayton, of Pittsburg, age 63, married, one dependent grandchild, died at approximated 11:00 a.m. on December 23, 1967 as a result of an accidental fall off of a stairway at the Peabody Coal Company, Eagle Mine, south of Shawneetown, Illinois. Mr. Clayton had worked at this mine for 14 days as an electrician.
      The accident occurred at a tipple which was under construction at the Eagle Strip Mine. Mr. Clayton, an electrician employed by Blair Electric Service Company, Bellwood, Pa., a sub-contractor for McNally Pittsburg Mfg. Co., who was erecting a preparation plant for Peabody Coal Co., had been working with two other men off of a scaffold putting up a bracket to carry electrical conduit. Mr. Fred Roper left as he was not needed. Mr. Harry Woolcott, the last man to see Mr. Clayton alive, had finished welding before he left to go to the upper deck to work on the bracket which he had been welding in an enclosed area. This left Mr. Clayton by himself. A few minutes later Mr. Clayton was found by Mr. Roper on the bottom floor of the preparation plant in a lying position, face down, with massive destruction to the top of the head. Mr. Roper checked for a pulse beat but could not detect any. An ambulance was called immediately. The scaffold from which Mr. Clayton had been working off of was just at the end of the 1½ story deck approximately 18 feet above the floor level.
 
CREST
September 27, 19095, Charles H. Crest, of Equality, laborer, aged 45 years, widower, was killed by falling roof in the mine of the Gallatin Coal and Coke Company at Equality. Crest went into the working place of Fred Shoemaker to clean up a fall which had occurred September 24. The roof at the time he went into the room was reported safe. About noon it was noticed by the miners that the roof was working loose and at 3:00 p. m. the fall came. He left three children.
 
DAVIS
August 29, 19199, Jess Davis, of Equality, miner, age 58 years, married, died from effects of injury received the preceding day by a fall of rock in Gallatin Coal and Coke Company's mine, Equality. He leaves a widow.
 
April 19, 193112, Robert Davis, of Eldorado, miner, age 47 years, married, employed in Logan Highway Coal Company's mine, died from injuries received March 10, by a shot explosion. He leaves a widow.
 
DOWNEY
June 26, 193112, William Downey, of Ridgeway, miner, age 30 years, married, was killed by a fall of roof in Logan Highway Coal Company's mine. He leaves a widow and one child.
 
DUNN
December 24, 198221, Mr. Darrell R. Dunn, of Harrisburg, age 46, married, four dependents, was fatally injured from a roof fall received at approximately 6:20 P.M., Wednesday, December 22, 1982, while in the performance of his duties as Foreman at Peabody Coal Company, Eagle No. 2, Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois.
      Mr. Dunn, was in charge of a work detail whose job was to build arches on the 1st Main South track entry. There had been rock falls in the area and the arches were needed for that area of the track. Several sections of arches were already completed when Mr. Dunn and the crew began their work and it was noticed that a large rock was hanging from the roof above the next section of arch, however all attempts to remove the rock failed due to its height above the track. While the arch immediately below this rock was being installed a portion fell striking Mr. Dunn, who was standing next to the last arch. Mr. Dunn, was struck in the head and was transported to Ferrell Hospital in Eldorado; he was then transferred to Welborn Hospital in Evansville, Indiana, where he died on Friday, December 24, 1982.
 
EDWARDS
August 2, 196715, Mr. Gary Lee Edwards, of Galatia, age 19, married, no dependent children, died August 2, 1967 at approximately 5:30 a.m. as a result of an electrical accident which occurred August 2, 1967 at the Peabody Coal Company, Eagle Mine Underground in Shawneetown, Illinois. Mr. Edwards had worked at this mine for 21 days.
      Mr. Edwards and Mr. Darold Winkleman, roof bolters, were working in the Third East off the Main South, bolting the Third East. Mr. Edwards was operating the roof bolter and was drilling for the 5th bolt when his buddy went back to the last crosscut to hang the roof bolter cable up and to assist the loading machine in moving across the entry. Mr. Winkleman had completed hanging his cable and started back towards the face when he saw Mr. Edwards lying on the floor. Mr. Winkleman examined the roof, then ran to get help. Artificial respiration was performed until the ambulance arrived and then Mr. Edwards was taken to the Eldorado Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival. The roof bolting machine was checked with a Milliamp Meter and was found to be carrying 212 volts on the chassis without any of the starting switches on. The trailing cable was pulled off the reel and checked. A splice in the cable was found which evidently went to ground causing the machine to be electrified.
 
November 22, 18973, William Edwards, a miner employed in the mine of the Equality Coal Company, at Equality, received injuries from a premature blast about 8:30 a. m., from which he died November 28. His shot had missed fire the evening before and, there being no work at the mine on the 22d, he asked some of the miners to accompany him, so that he might show them how to drill out a miss-fired shot. He took a churn drill and churned out the tamping, and when he came to the powder it exploded and burned him so severely that he died from its effects. Deceased was 50 years old, and leaves a widow and three children.
 
FOWLER
December 2, 192010, George Fowler, driver, age not given, was killed in Gallatin Coal & Coke Company's mine by being caught between two pit-cars.
 
GOOLSBY
September 10, 197620, Mr. Richard Lee Goolsby, age 30, married, three dependents, came to his death by electrical shock at approximately 5:50 A.M., Friday, September 10, 1976, while in the performance of his duties as Maintenance Foreman at Peabody Coal Company, Eagle No. 2 Mine, Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois.
      Mr. Goolsby and Mr. Mike McDonald, Repairman, were working on a Methane Monitor, which had a malfunction on a 10 Loading Machine, in the Main North Section of the Mine. They had taken the cover off of the power pack box and checked the power and the monitor. They tried a new monitor which would not work, and decided after all of the checking that the trouble was in the 7th conductor plug. Mr. Goolsby was in the canopy of the loader when they decided to change the 7th conductor plug, and while unplugging the 7th conductor lead from the power box to the methane monitor, Mr. Goolsby's left hand came in contact with the fuse clip in the 440 volt power box and he was electrocuted.
 
HAWKINS
December 14, 19054, Charles Hawkins, of Equality, miner, aged 29 years, married, employed by the Dempsey Brothers at Equality, Gallatin County, lost his life by dropping fire from his lamp into the powder while making a cartridge. He was helped out of the mine by miners and died the same day. He leaves a widow and two children.
 
HOCK
May 15, 197117, Mr. Cecil Lee Hock, of Herrin, age 24, married, no dependent children, came to his death at 3:20 p.m. May 15, 1971, from a roof fall while performing his duties as a Loader Helper at the Peabody Coal Co., Eagle No. 1 Underground Mine, Gallatin County, Shawneetown, Illinois, where he had been employed for 3 years.
      The loader crew had loaded 53 shuttle cars of rock at the time of the accident. They were loading rock that had been shot down for an overcast. A space 42' long and 24' wide had been loaded out. This space was not supported, but was being scaled and sounded between shuttle cars. The loader operator was loading to the left on his last shuttle car of rock at the time of the accident. He was under supported roof at the time. Mr. Cecil Hock was also under supported roof to the right. He walked out into the area that was unsupported and which had been previously loaded out. A piece of shale fell from the roof knocking him down. The piece measured 21 feet long by 9 feet wide, 3 to 4 inches at the thickest point, tapering to feathered edges. He was taken to the surface and rushed to the Ferrill Hospital at Eldorado, Illinois. A Pnealator Resuscitator was used on him from the surface to the hospital. He was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Cody.
 
KANADY
November 22, 196715, Mr. Nolan G. Kanady, of Shawneetown, age 44, married, three dependent children, died November 22, 1967 from extreme pressure on the chest cavity from dirt and rock in the cab of the grader he was driving, gathered in the fall into the pit at the Eagle Mine Strip Pit, Peabody Coal Co., south of Shawneetown, Illinois. Mr. Kanady had been employed at this mine for eight months.
      The accident occurred on November 22, 1967 at approximately 9:15 p.m. Mr. Kanady, a grader operator, was moving the grader on the haulage road traveling east when he apparently lost control of the grader. The grader left the road traveling down the shoulder for a distance of 87 feet at an angle of 60 degrees then went over the embankment to land 60 feet below. Mr. Kanady was removed from the grader at approximately 10:40 p.m. and was taken by ambulance to Shawneetown, Illinois where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Stinell.
      The road grader was found with the front wheels in the water, lying on its left side, rear wheels on the dirt bank and the cab filled with dirt. Tire haulage road at the point of the accident was of crushed rock 30 feet wide with an eight per cent grade and a dirt shoulder 45 feet wide with a five per cent grade.
 
KING
November 21, 196114, Mr. David King, Jr., of Sturgis, Kentucky, age 36, married, six dependent children, was fatally injured at the B & W Coal Company No. 1, located at Junction, Gallatin County, Illinois at approximately 8:45 a.m. November 21, 1961 by driving his shuttle car into the outby rib of the last crosscut between Room 7 and 8 off 13 E. M. N. as he was coming out with a load of coal which had just been loaded at the fact of Room 7. The crosscut was 14½ feet wide at that point and the coal seam 4 feet 4 inches in thickness. A small amount of overhanging coal was on the rib at the point of impact with about 2-inch thickness of top coal 18 to 24 inches wide extending out about 18 inches.
      After Mr. King ran the car into the rib and before he was extricated, the car was pushed 2 to 3 feet by the joy loader operator who said he did it at the request of the other shuttle car operator and that he did not then know Mr. King was caught and was hurt.
 
LEGER
March 1, 197218, Mr. James E. Leger, age 20, single, came to his death at 12:12 p.m. on March 1, 1972 from an accident which occurred at 4:35 a.m. on February 25, 1972. He sustained crushing injuries while performing his duties as a shuttle car operator at the Peabody Coal Co., Eagle Mine No. 1, Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois where he had been employed for 1 months.
      Mr. Sam Pyle, loading machine operator and his buddy, Mr. Barney Butler were cleaning up the face of the No. 4 straight entry in the 3rd North panel off the Main East. He was in the center of the No. 4 entry and at the face. Mr. James Leger, the shuttle car operator, had been under the boom of the machine. 400 or 500 lbs. of coal had been loaded in the shuttle car. The operator of the shuttle car moved back from the face 22 feet with the shuttle car moving outby at the same time. Mr. Pyle then moved the machine back towards the face 7 feet and stopped his machine. The shuttle car was still moving outby at this time. The shuttle car driver was facing the machine, with his back to the direction his car was moving. Mr. Leger's shuttle car went on an angle towards a line curtain on the same side that the driver was sitting. He ran into the rib of the entry at the corner of the crosscut pinning himself between the rib and shuttle car. The entry at the point where he was pinned was 20 feet wide. A shuttle car was used to push against the side of his shuttle car so that Mr. Leger could be released. On being released, Mr. Leger fell backwards on his back. His right foot was underneath the brake pedal. He was given artificial respiration as he was not breathing and was unconscious. He was taken to the top, sent by ambulance to the Ferrell Hospital, Eldorado, and Dr. Cody went with him by ambulance to the Good Samaritan Hospital, Mt. Vernon where he was put on the critical list. Mr. William Hatfield, the section foreman and Jerry Sweat, a repairman also were in the ambulance.
      Mr. Leger passed away March 1, 1972 at 12:12 p.m. at the Good Samaratin Hospital, Mt. Vernon, Illinois.
 
MARTIN
September 15, 193112, J. C. Martin, of Kedson, miner, age 53 years, married, was killed by a fall of rock in his own local mine. He leaves a widow.
 
MILLER
March 12, 193112, Winnie Miller, of Ridgeway, miner, age 51 years, single, died from injuries sustained two days previous in Logan Highway Coal Company's mine by a shot explosion. He leaves four children.
 
NEWTON
March 2, 197016, Mr. Ben Newton, age 46, Eldorado, married, no dependent children, came to his death at 2:40 p.m. on March 2, 1970 from injuries accidentally received when his left side was crushed from a rock fall received at the Peabody Coal Co., Eagle Mine No. 2, Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois while he was in the performance of his duties as a Mine Examiner where he had been employed for 364 days.
      Mr. Newton was in the performance of his duties as a Mine Examiner examining the 4th Main East. There were three falls of coal in the 4th Main East. The two crosscuts were in one cut each. There were five bolts in the last row, toward the face and a regular pattern of bolts outby. Mr. Newton had been on top of the fall of coal in the straight 4th Main East, when draw rock fell from the last row of bolts inby and feathered out at the face and also the right side. The fall of rock measured 10' x 16' across and a piece 8½" x 4 ½" x 8" thick broke off of the outby end, covering Mr. Newton with the exception of his right arm. The rock had to be jacked up off of Mr. Newton before he could be removed.
 
ROBERTSON
May 14, 197419, Mr. Thomas L. Robertson, of Creal Springs, age 25, married, one dependent, came to his death at about the hour of 5:10 a.m., May 14, 1974, from being struck in the chest by a metal rim off a roof bolting machine, while in the performance of his duties as Repairman at the Peabody Coal Company, Eagle No. 2 Mine, Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois.
      Mr. Robertson was using an oxygen and acetylene torch to cut the lug bolts off that held the wheel on the bolting machine, which also holds the wheel together when they are in contact. All ten lug bolts had been cut out and the air pressure of the tire forced the metal wheel apart. Mr. Robertson was struck in the chest by a metal split rim off a roof bolting machine. The two parts of the wheel were held together by five bolts, 2-1/2 inches by 5/8 inches. However, the investigation showed that two of the five bolts were broken and one had the threads damaged to the extent that it was not holding, while the lug bolts were intact they also held the wheel together. The heat generated by the cutting torch added to the air pressure, causing it to erupt more violently. The pressure was so great on the two bolts that were holding the wheel together, they were completely stripped out.
 
SMITH
February 9, 197016, Mr. Levittes Smith, of Shawneetown, age 47, married, 6 dependent children was fatally injured on February 3, 1970, and died of his injuries on February 9, 1970 at 1 :40 a.m. at the Ferrell Hospital, Eldorado, Illinois from a crushed pelvis, both hips broken, left leg broken and internal bleeding while in the performance of his duties as a repairman at the Peabody Coal Cos., Eagle Mine No. 1, Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois, where he had been employed for about 3 years.
      Mr. Smith and Mr. John Holland were working on a Torkar S Car in the No. 10 room, 3rd west off the 1st north. Mr. Smith was in a sitting position with both legs crossed under him working on the Tork convertor. The No. 11 room, which was parallel to the No. 10 room, was being used as a haulage road to the loading station. The shuttle car driver was coming from the face with a loaded car down the No. 11 room when he turned one crosscut too soon into the No. 10 room heading directly toward the parked Torkar, and caught Mr. Smith between the two cars. The Torkar, which was being driven, did not have lights operating at the time of this accident. Mr. Smith was given first aid, put on a stretcher, and taken by ambulance to the Ferrell Hospital in Eldorado where he was placed on the critical list until his death.
 
TOSH
November 25, 193813, Kilmer Tosh, of Eldorado, loader, aged 28 years, married, killed by fall of rock m mine No. 1 of the Logan Highway Coal Co., leaving widow.
 
WILSON
August 20, 192111, J. A. Wilson, of Danville, timberman, age 67 years, married, was killed by a fall of rock in Hickory Hill Coal Company's mine. He leaves a widow.
 

 
Gallatin County, Illinois
Non-Fatal Casualties

July 1, 1923 - June 30, 1924 & July 1, 1925 - December 31, 1925
MILLSPAUGH, Frank age 36 years, Machineman, employed by Saline Creek Coal Co.
20 Nov 1925 - Toes mashed, machine - Time lost - 45 days
 

 
Sources : :
1 Coal Mines in Illinois, Gallatin County; including the Quadrangles
                Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL. 61820

2 History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin and Williamson Counties, Illinois.
                The Goodspeed Publishing Co.; John Morris Company, Printers, Chicago; 1887

3 Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1898
                Coal in Illinois;    Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1899

4 Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906,
                also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1906, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1907

5 Twenty-Ninth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1910
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1911

6 Thirty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1913
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1914

7 Thirty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1914
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1914

8 Thirty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1919
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1919

9 Thirty-Ninth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1920
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1920

10 Fortieth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1921
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Phillips Bros. Print, Springfield, Illinois; 1921

11 Forty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1922
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1922

12 Fiftieth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1931
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1932

13 Fifty -Seventh Coal Report of Illinois, 1938
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

14 Eightieth Coal Report of Illinois, 1961
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

15 Eighty-Sixth Coal Report of Illinois, 1967
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

16 Eighty-Ninth Coal Report of Illinois, 1970
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

17 Ninety Coal Report of Illinois, 1971
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

18 Ninety-first Coal Report of Illinois, 1972
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

19 Ninety-third Coal Report of Illinois, 1974
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

20 Ninety-fifth Coal Report of Illinois, 1976
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

21 One-Hundred-First Coal Report of Illinois, 1982
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois


Coal & Coal Mining in Illinois

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