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Bureau County, Illinois

Featuring Coal Mining
 
The Cherry Mine Disaster
November 13, 1909

 
The Mine Fire             List of Fatalities            Sources
 
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Bureau County, Illinois Coal Mining Coal Mines Bureau County
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Reference Sources
Disasters at Illinois Coal Mines - See : Coal Mine Disasters

The Cherry Mine Disaster
Fire of November 13, 1909 1, 8
      This appalling calamity, which took place at Cherry, Bureau County, in the mine owned and operated by the St. Paul Coal Company, as reported by Thomas Hudson, State Inspector for the Second District, is described as follows:
 
      From the most reliable reports to be obtained, the fire commenced at or about 1:30 p. m., on Saturday, November 13, 1909. The place where the fire started was at, or quite near the landing place, in the airshaft, at the second vein, where the coal from the third vein is hoisted through said airshaft and taken off the cage at the second vein, and hauled around to the main shaft, recaged and hoisted to the surface.
 
      The cause of the fire, from information gleaned at the mine, was a pit car containing five or six bales of hay, intended for the third vein, was sent down the main shaft and hauled around in the second vein to the airshaft landing above mentioned. This pit car, containing the hay, was placed near, probably directly under, a blazing open torch, placed there to give light to the cagers, consisting of two men and a boy. The oil burned in this torch was quite likely kerosene; it is also very possible that some of the oil dripped from the torch and fell on the hay in the pit car; at all events, the hay is supposed to have caught fire from the torch, and certainly could have been easily extinguished if immediate steps had been taken to do so. The car of burning hay, however, seems to have been pushed around from one position to another in an air current having a velocity of about 700 feet per minute, until it had fired the overhead timbers. The car containing the burning hay was finally pushed into the shaft opening and fell into the "sump" at the third vein, where it was quickly extinguished; but the heavy pine overhead timbers at the second vein were by this time on fire and could not be reached because of the dense smoke; by this time the control of the fire was lost, and the result was the worst mine disaster of modern times.
 
      Late Saturday night and early Sunday morning, November 14, the mine inspectors of Illinois began to arrive at the mine. The force was augmented later by mine inspectors from other states; one came from Indiana, two from Ohio, two from Iowa and one from Missouri. Professional experts from Pittsburgh and Champaign experimental stations, and about a dozen firemen from the Chicago fire department, were also on the ground. During the day, Sunday 14th, two men from Champaign, with helmets, succeeded in reaching the second vein through the air shaft in a sinking bucket, but could do nothing more as the smoke and steam were too dense for exploration. Both shafts were covered over and remained so during the night.
 
      Monday, November 15: Men with helmets again descended the air shaft; they reported the temperature fairly comfortable but smoke and steam still too dense for active work. It was then decided to case the fan temporarily as an exhaust (the fan casing having been destroyed and the babbit metal melted out of the journals, when it was reversed from a blower to an exhaust during the early stage of the fire) start the fan and attempt a descent into the mine through the main shaft. This was done, and the main shaft uncovered. The air shaft now became the upcast, and men wearing helmets went down the main shaft, the cages in this shaft being in good working order; when they got to the bottom, or second vein, they found the fire raging and were forced to return to the surface; the fresh air admitted by making the main shaft the downcast had started the partially subdued fire into a blaze. Both shafts were then covered over, and remained so during the night.
 
      Tuesday, November 16: Both shafts remained covered over during the day, which was spent mainly in taking the temperature of the mine by lowering a thermometer to the second vein, and in every case, the bottom of the main shaft at this vein was found too hot for work of any kind.
 
      Wednesday, November 17: Temperatures were again taken and found to be about the same as on the day previous. A conference was held by the inspectors of Illinois with those from Ohio, Iowa, Indiana, Missouri and the mining experts from Pittsburgh and Champaign, also the representatives of the coal company. It was decided to again have men with helmets go down the air shaft; they descended about 9 p. m. and found the temperature more favorable and no fire in sight; of course men did not leave the sinking bucket when they descended. During the night a "float" or temporary cage was constructed for use in the air shaft, should exploration work be again attempted from that point.
 
      Thursday, November 18: The main shaft was uncovered late that day, and a line of hose put down to the second vein, and fire fighting in earnest commenced; this was done principally from the north cage, as fire was blazing on the south and east sides of the shaft, which prevented firemen from leaving the cage. The men with helmets during the day went down the air shaft on the "float" and recovered one body that had been seen on a previous trip. Fire fighting was kept up constantly at the main shaft during the night.
 
      Friday, November 19: Progress was made, advancing on the west side shaft parting at the second vein; four bodies were found and brought to the surface. The Chicago firemen were in charge of the fire fighting below. The east and south sides of the shaft bottom were inaccessible, owing to the heavy falls of roof and burning timbers, the west side of the shaft only being open. During the day explorers got around on the south entry, and then east to a point not far from the bottom of the air shaft in the second vein, but falls of roof had to be cleaned up, and repairs made in the timbering; this was ordered done during the night. In the evening, after a conference, the inspectors from other states and seven of the Illinois inspectors returned to their homes, three of the Illinois inspectors remaining in charge. This action was taken because the inspectors considered that the company had a sufficient number of able men on the ground to take care of the situation.
 
      Saturday, November 20: The fire was now seemingly under control -- that part, at least, which was accessible from the bottom of the main shaft; the heavy falls of roof on the east side of the shaft, probably 35 feet high, were loaded out and the smouldering fire quenched as it was reached.
 
      At 10:30 a. m., the Illinois mine inspectors remaining over from the day before left the mine, urgent business in other parts of their respective districts calling them away; one of them having a mine explosion that had occurred the previous week to investigate, by which two shot firers had been killed.
 
      It was shortly after noon on this date, when an exploring party found twenty-one men alive in the first west off of the main south entry. The imprisoned men had built "stoppings," thereby shutting out the foul gases from the fire, and depending on the purer air in the enclosed space to sustain life. They were at once removed from the mine, all but one recovering.
 
      Telegraph messages were sent to all the Illinois inspectors and they hurried back to the mine, several of them arriving within a few hours. During the night, explorations were made in the east entries off of the main south.
      Monday, November 22: The exploring of the south section of the mine continued through the day; about 100 dead bodies were taken out of that part of the workings.
 
      Tuesday and Wednesday, November 23 and 24: On these dates, the first northwest entries were explored, the face of the entries was reached, but no bodies were found. It was learned later that all of the men got out of this part of the mine; it was also found that there was no connection between the northwest part of the workings, where the exploration was made, and the north part of the workings on the east side of the shaft, where many men were known to be at work the day the fire started.
 
      While the explorers were in the northwest entries, smoke was found issuing from the main passageway which connects the west shaft parting with the air shaft and which was closed by a fall of roof and a temporary stopping; the explorers in the northwest section were hastily recalled, then the temporary stopping was pulled down, and a stream of water from the fire hose turned in, and all signs of fire subdued at that point, and a more substantial stopping put in during the night.
 
      About 2 o'clock a. m., Wednesday, the 24th, a party of four went down into the third vein. On their return they reported from three to four feet of water covering the floor of the mine in the lower parts of the workings, and that they had found groups of men in the dry parts, all dead. Pumps were being made ready in the meantime to remove the water, partially at least, from the third vein workings so that the bodies could be recovered.
 
      During the succeeding few hours, however, it was noticed that the fire from the south and east sides of the main shaft was slowly encroaching on the shaft itself. Holes were cut in the shaft lining as high as 30 feet from the bottom and streams of water thrown in behind the shaft lining; but the steam and smoke continued to issue from the openings cut and also from the sides of the shaft, in increasing quantities; to offset this a board stopping was built around the south and east sides of the shaft, and as close thereto as the workings of the cages would permit, and a stopping closed tight, near the bottom of the air shaft. The object of this was to deaden, or partially subdue, the fire thought to be burning between those points. This, however, was not entirely successful, as the smoke from behind the shaft lining, which formerly passed to the east and around to the upcast or air shaft was now carried to the west side of the main shaft, and the rescuers there practically driven from the mine.
 
      A strong smell of coal smoke was noted, indicating that the coal pillars were on fire, and as the gases given off by burning coal were known to be dangerous, great caution became necessary. Some time shortly after midnight on the morning of Thursday, November 25, a consultation was held, at which the president of the State Mining Board, chief of the fire department, expert helmetmen from Champaign, the Illinois mine inspectors and representatives of the St. Paul Coal Company were present. The situation was discussed from every possible point of view, and it seemed to be the unanimous opinion of all present that all of the men in the mine were dead; and the best way, looking to the recovery of the bodies later, was to seal up both of the shafts while they were in this condition, to be entered as soon as the fire was extinguished.
 
      The sealing of the shafts was commenced early Thursday morning, November 25th. A two inch pipe was inserted in the concrete cover of the main shaft, so that the temperature, pressure and condition of the air from the mine could be obtained at short intervals and the exact conditions of the underground workings of the mine understood.
 
      Such is a brief story of this, the worst coal mine disaster in our State, in number of lives lost. The mine was sealed on November 25, 1909, and opened 67 days later on February 1, 1910.
 
      A collection was taken up for the widows and orphans, in the sum of $41,000.00. A total of nearly one million dollars in money, including company settlement in compensation, was paid to the families.
 
A monument of gray granite is now over the location, at the southwest edge of Cherry, on Illinois Route 89. This Memorial Monument and Cemetery is posted under the name of the Holy Trinity Miners Church of Cherry, Illinois. The gray granite is inscribed:
 
TO THE MEMORY OF THE MINERS WHO LOST THEIR LIVES IN
THE CHERRY MINE DISASTER
November 13, 1909
 
Erected by the U. M. W. of A. District No. 12, Illinois
November 13, 1911
Number Lost 256

 
      This cemetery was under the supervision of Local Union No. 2711, U. M. W. of A., Cherry, Illinois, until the year 1946. At that time it was taken over by the Honorable Father Anthony Whermann, pastor, of the Holy Trinity Church, Cherry, Illinois, who is the caretaker in person, and maintains the cemetery in excellent condition.
 
Reopening of the Cherry Mine.
      Both shafts of the Cherry mine were securely sealed over with steel rails and concrete on the morning of November 25, 1909, and remained sealed until February 1, 1910.
 
      During this interval, daily readings of the temperature in the main shaft had been taken, and were found to range from 123° on November 29, four days after the shaft was sealed, to 121° December 1; 93° December 10; 84° December 20; 74° December 30; 70° January 10; 68° January 20; 66° January 29, and the same on February 1, when the shaft was opened; this was assumed to be the normal temperature of the mine under existing conditions.
 
      In the opening up the main shaft, an aperture about three feet square was cut in the concrete covering, just above the cover of the north cage, which had been left suspended directly under the concrete cover when the shaft was sealed; the south cage had been taken off.
 
      The same day this opening in the concrete cover, two men, Webb and Moses, wearing oxygen helmets, were passed on to the cage and lowered to the second vein. After an investigation around the bottom they were hoisted to the surface, and reported conditions just about as they were when the shaft was sealed up, except, no signs of fire nor smoke were visible, and the temperature at the bottom of the shaft normal and quite comfortable to work in. They descended a s econd time, and brought up a sample of air for analysis in which "black damp" or carbon dioxide predominated.
 
      Late in the same afternoon, the concrete covers from both the main and the air shafts were removed, and the fan started up as an exhaust, that is, the fresh air was drawn down the main shaft and up the air shaft. It might be stated here that the Capell fan, which had been warped and twisted with the heat during the fire, had been taken away and thoroughly repaired and again put in position and cased in a substantial manner.
 
      After a short interval, to allow the fan to clear the passage or west "runaround" between the main and air shafts, two of the State inspectors, with safety lamps, descended the main shaft, and found a good current of air passing from the main or downcast, towards the air or upcast shaft. They returned to the surface and reported the mine in a safe condition for workmen with naked lights to enter, which they did, and during the night repaired and reinforced the brattice around the east and south sides of the main shaft, also commenced to clean out the west passageway or "runaround" to the air shaft which was found in a very bad and dangerous condition, owing to falls of roof broken timbers, etc.
 
      It was considered, that the best and safest method was, to employ only a limited number of men underground, a number just sufficient to open up the west passageway to the escape and air shaft. After this road is opened and the air shaft put in order to take men out of the mine, an escapement or two ways out of the mine will be available. This will make men working below feel more safe, as it is not likely that fire can break out at both shafts at the same time. The cleaning out and retimbering of the west passageway to the air shaft continued to be slow and dangerous work impeded as it was, by heavy falls of roof. By a good deal of hard and dangerous work, a small opening was made over, under and by the side of the falls in the west passageway to the bottom of the airshaft, and through this opening boards were taken and a "stopping ' put in on the north side of the air shaft to prevent any sudden breaking out of fire from that direction.
 
      Cleaning up and retimbering between the two shafts continued, care being taken to keep a close watch on all stoppings to prevent leaks or a sudden breaking out of fire.
 
      The body of a man that v/as known to be lying at the second vein landing at the air shaft was brought to the surface February 14, in a sinking bucket.
 
      February 5: A large steam pump was sent down the main shaft to the second vein. An extra covering of brattice was put around the east and south sides of the bottom of the main shaft at the second vein. The concrete was shipped away from around the collar of the airshaft, and a "float" put in, and suspended just below the surface, ready for carpenters to make permanent repairs to the burned out portion of the air shaft.
 
      February 6: The west passageway from the main to the air shaft was now cleaned out and securely timbered and open for the passage of pit cars. An entry is being drawn in the shaft pillar around the north side of the main shaft and the heavy fall of roof on the east bottom, to connect again with the shaft bottom on the east side, inside of the burned out timbers and fall. This entry will give access to the east and northeast sections of the mine and to the air shaft by way of the west passageway. Men were cleaning up the main south entry on the west side to recover rails, ties, pit cars and other material. The use of the cages in the main shaft were taken up most of the day by workmen making pipe connections for "steam jets" to throw water from the third vein to a tank located at the second vein, where it is taken up by the steam pump at the second vein and thrown to the surface. The emergency cage at the third vein, main shaft, was hoisted to the second vein and reduced to a size suitable to allow the steam jets to pass to one side of it.
 
      February 7 and 8: Work in the mine was progressing slowly; cleaning up the south entry, west side; driving the entry around the main shaft and fall on east side, also fitting water and steam pipes in the main shaft for pumps and injectors.
 
      February 9 and 10: When steam was turned on to the injectors and pump the heat caused the pipes to expand, they were thrown out of line and were struck and broken by a descending cage. A concrete stopping was put in on the second east entry, west side, near the bottom of the airshaft.
 
      February 11 and 12: The pipe line was repaired and started up but was broken again but repaired, and at 8 a. m. the 12th both pump and injectors were working steadily and doing good work. The entry around the main shaft was driven in 120 feet and has about 70 feet more to be completed.
 
      February 13 and 19, inclusive: The work done during the week consisted in holding the entry into the main bottom, east side, and putting .a concrete stopping across the main bottoms inside of the east opening, to the mule stables; cleaning up heavy falls of roof on the main north entry, east side, and in the east passageway or runaround to the air shaft.
 
      Fifteen bodies were recovered during the week; all were found near where the new entry connected with the main bottom inside of the large fall thereon.
 
      The shaft timbers in the main shaft were again giving off considerable smoke and heat, showing quite plainly that the fire was smouldering behind them, and in dangerous proximity thereto. Pumping from the third vein was suspended until more brattice could be put around the bottom of the main shaft to keep back the fire.
 
      February 20 and 21: The pump and injectors were still idle, as the steam given off prevents a close watch for fire being observed on the main shaft. Three more bodies were recovered on the 21st; they were found just outside of the second door going south in the east passageway to the escape shaft. The pumps and injectors were started again but shut down later, because of the smoke and heat from the shaft lining.
 
      One more body was found on the evening of the 23d under a large fall of roof, on the main north entry, east side.
 
      February 24: Good work was being done in repairing the burned out lining and partition in the airshaft; in two or three days the work of putting in the burned out stairway from the second vein to the surface will be completed. The east passageway to the air shaft is cleaned up and retimbered and in shape for the hauling of pit cars.
 
      February 27 to March 5: During the week ending March 5th cleaning up of the north entry, east side was continued, and sixty-five bodies in that section of the mine were recovered.
 
      It is quite probable that all of the bodies in the 2d vein have now been recovered, except perhaps some that may be covered up by "falls" on the shaft bottom or parting on the east side, or in the direct passageway, from the shaft parting on the west side to the air shaft.
 
      March 6 to 13: The northeast workings of the second vein, were quite thoroughly explored, and rails, pit cars and other material taken out; pumping water from the third vein was continued. An injector was put in at the air shaft, to raise the water from the third vein to the second and a pump was installed at the second vein to raise the water to the surface, both were working in a satisfactory manner. The water at the air shaft in the third vein was reported to be two inches below the "door heads" on March 9th; on this date, the main shaft was again giving off heat and smoke, so much so, that all of the men also two mules were brought out of the mine, and carpenters again put to work patching up the brattices. A wooden form was put around the east and south sides of the main shaft, and about six inches of sand bedded therein to shut off the smoke. The sand packing proved successful, the smoke being practically shut off. The injectors and pumps at both shafts were in operation, the water at the bottom of the air shaft in the third vein was nine inches below the door heads March 13.
 
      March 13 to 26: There was not much work during the past two weeks except the pumping of water from the third vein. March 26 two and a half feet of water was above the rail at the bottom of the air shaft.
 
      March 27 to 29: The water was fairly well removed, a cage was prepared to hoist rock from the third vein to the second at the air shaft; large falls of roof were encountered both north and south. The pump at the third vein, bottom of the air shaft was started up and was working fairly well; this pump had been submerged since the sealing of the mine, November 25th.
 
      March 29: Richard Newsam, president of the State Mining Board, and four State inspectors of mines, some of whom had been on duty continuously since the opening of the mine February 1st, went down from the second and the third vein on the emergency cage at the main shaft. They found about two and one-half feet of water at the cage landing; the shaft bottom, east and west, also the mule stables, where heavy, permanent timbering had been done were all found standing intact. After leaving the main bottom, however, large falls of roof were found; in fact, the entries around the shaft pillar, in every direction were practically closed. This condition required a great deal of time and labor, before the bodies known to be in the third vein were reached.
 
      April 1 to 6: The work of cleaning up the falls in the north section of the third vein was continued. Connections having been made between the main and airshafts, at the third vein.
 
      April 7: Mine Inspector McAllister, mine manager Frew and John Fraser, a shift foreman, by climbing over falls, broken timbers and other obstructions, located the bodies of the men in the third vein. They were found at the end of the north air course, running direct from the bottom of the air shaft, just at the north boundary of the shaft pillar. Workmen were at once started to clean out the air course, north from the main shaft bottom, as this was the nearest and quickest way to reach the bodies.
 
      April 10: One body was recovered from the third vein; April 11, thirty-five bodies were taken out; April 12, fifteen bodies were taken out, making fifty-one bodies in all taken from the third vein.
 
      The bodies of these men were found comparatively close together within a radius of not more than about 100 feet. According to the record of F. P. Buck, the clerk in the office at the mine, ten or twelve men are still missing, but as five men have been located, working at other mines, who were supposed to be lost in the Cherry mine, some of the missing men may be found in like manner. However, if any more bodies are in the mine, they will be found as the cleaning up process progresses.
 
      The four State inspectors, who had been on duty by relays since the opening of the mine, February 1st, considering they could be of not further service, or not until the fire area should be broken into, left for their homes April 13, 1910.
 
Opening of the Fire Area and Securing the Shafts in the Cherry Mine.
      After the recovering of the bodies from the third vein April 12, about thirty days were consumed in removing the pit cars, track, timber and everything of value from the interior workings of the second vein, it having been decided by the company to abandon that seam permanently.
 
      May 14: After a narrow entry had been driven through the shaft pillar on the west side, to connect with the pump room an opening about 12 feet wide, and 70 feet in length, running from the south end of the main shaft to the stable in which the fire was known to be burning; another opening was made into the pump room, where a good deal of fire was in evidence, especially the coal "ribs" which were actively burning, but with an abundant supply of water, under a 300 foot head, and the necessary hose connections, the fire was easily kept under control, and the shale roof which had fallen to a height of fully 30 feet, was loaded into pit cars and sent out of the mine.
 
      As soon as a suflicient space was cleaned, two sets of heavy timbers were set up, and on top of these "cogs" were formed and built up to the top, and the roof secured.
 
      The building of the "cogs" were most difficult and dangerous; difficult, because of the intense heat, which was more intense as the "cogs" were placed higher; and dangerous because of the unreliable nature of the roof, large slabs of which fell or were liable to fall at all times.
 
      The heat was partially overcome by putting a small air compressor into operation and carrying compressed air down the shaft in pipes and thence through hose to the men at work. As soon as sufficient space was cleared, and the roof temporarily secured by "cogging," a base for concrete dams or stoppings was formed by cutting down into the floor and into the sides of the opening or entry, and a concrete stopping built, quite close to where the pump room connected with the stables. The same methods described above were used in breaking into the fire area on the shaft bottom, east of the main shaft, and on the north side of the air shaft.
 
      The conditions encountered were similar in each case, but differed somewhat in degrees; that is, more fire was found on the main shaft parting than in the pump room and less north of the air shaft.
 
      After the fallen roof had been removed from around both shafts, the work of thoroughly securing the same with concrete was commenced. On the east side of the main shaft a heavy wall or "backing" of concrete was built against the shaft timbers, and at right angles thereto; three walls of concrete one on each rib and one in the center were built to connect with a concrete stopping about 28 feet east of the main shaft. These walls are built to within about a foot of the roof, about 30 feet high, and across them are laid steel rails and wedges driven between the rails and the roof, thoroughly securing the latter.
 
      Openings are left in the concrete walls around both shafts, to admit the passage of any one desiring to examine or inspect the walls and stoppings.
 
      Practically the same methods as described above, are used to secure the south side of the main shaft, and the north side of the air shaft. The "old works" of the second vein are completely cut off from the main shaft by permanent stoppings and a new entry has been driven around the main shaft, and through the shaft pillar to the air shaft.
 
      Through this entry, pipes are laid connecting the "rings" in the airshaft, which gives oil abundance of water, with a concrete reservoir built near the main shaft at the second vein. From this reservoir the third vein will obtain its water supply for fire fighting purposes. The distance between the two veins being 160 feet, the pressure due to the altitude will be about 80 pounds per square inch.
 
      During the week ending August 13th, steel guides were put in between the second and third veins, new ropes put on and the cages running down to the third vein; and the cleaning up well underway. September 3, the cleaning up had progressed so far, that the coal face had been readied at five or six different points, and it is fair to assume, that by October 1, 1910, the mine will again be in a coal producing condition.
 
      Note -- On July 7th the body of a man was found about 10 feet north of the air shaft, under a large fall of roof. In regard to the number of men lost, and number of bodies recovered, the following statement was received from an official of the St. Paul Coal Company.
 
      August 16, 1910 --
Total number believed to be lost. . . . . .256
Total number of bodies recovered from second vein. . . . . .187
Total number of bodies recovered from third vein. . . . . .51
Lost, by burning on the cage. . . . . .12
Thought to be lost in the mine but found later alive and working at other parts of the State. . . . . .11
Still missing, but whether in the mine or gone to parts unknown can not at this time be determined. . . . . .6
           Respectfully submitted,
                Thos. Hudson.
      State Mine Inspector, Second District, Galva, Ill.

Fatal Casualties of the Cherry Mine Disaster
in the Mine Fire of November 13, 1909
A
 
Amider, Alfio, of Cherry, miner, aged 18 years, single.
 
Agramanti, Foliani, of Cherry, miner, aged 40 years, married with two children.
 
Alexius, Joseph, of Cherry, aged 28 years, single
 
Atalakis, Peter, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, single.
 
Atalakis, G., of Cherry, miner, aged 39 years, single.
 
Adakosky, M.of Cherry, miner, aged 18 years, single.
 
Armelani, Chas., of Cherry, trackman, aged 32 years, married with three children.
 
B
 
Bakalar, Geo., of Cherry, miner, aged 25 years, married with one child.
 
Barozzi, Antone, of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, married.
 
Bastia, Mike, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, married with one child.
 
Bauer, Milce, of Cherry, miner, aged 43 years, married with one child.
 
Bawman, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, single.
 
Bawman, Lewis, of Cherry, miner, aged 31 years, married with one child.
 
Bayliff, Thomas, of Cherry, miner, aged 31 years, married with two children.
 
Benossif, J., of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, single.
 
Bernadini, Chas., of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, married with one child.
 
Bertolioni, Tonzothe, of Cherry, miner, aged 22 years, single.
 
Betot, John, of Cherry, trackman, aged 40 years, married with four children.
 
Bolla, Antonio, of Cherry, miner, aged 24 years, single.
 
Bolla, Peter, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, married with one child.
 
Bordesona, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 35 years, additional information not reported.
 
Boucher, Jerome, of Cherry, miner, aged 39 years, married with one child.
 
Bosviel, Adolph, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married with two children.
 
Brain, Oliver of Cherry, miner, aged 40 years, married with two children.
 
Bredenci, Peter, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, married with two children.
 
Brown, John, of Cherry, cager, aged 33 years, single.
 
Brown, Thomas, of Cherry, miner, aged 51 years, married.
 
Bruno, Edward, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married.
 
Bruzis, John, of Cherry, timberman, additional information not reported.
 
Buckels, Richard, of Cherry, spragger, single with two children and one other dependent.
 
Budzom, Chas, of Cherry, miner, aged 30 years, married with one child.
 
Budzon, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 30 years, married with two children.
 
Bundy, John, of Cherry, mine manager, married with eight children.
 
Burke, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 31 years, married with one child.
 
Burslie, Clemento, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, married with three children.
 
Butilla, August, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, single.
 
C
 
Cagoskey, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 56 years, married with three children.
 
Camilli, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 36 years, married with one child.
 
Canov, Canivo, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married with two children.
 
Carlo, Elfi, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, single.
 
Casolari, Diminick, of Italy, miner, aged 40 years, single.
 
Casollari, Elizio, of Seatonville, miner, aged 29 years, single.
 
Casserio, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, single.
 
Castoinelo, Chelsto, of Cherry, miner, aged 27 years, married with two children.
 
Cavaglini, Chas., of Italy, miner, aged 45 years, single with three dependents.
 
Chebubar, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, married with four children.
 
Ciocci, Peter, of Cherry, miner, aged 24 years, single.
 
Cioci, Canical, of Cherry, miner, aged 22 years, additional information not reported.
 
Cipola, Mike, of Streator, miner, aged 40 years, married with three children.
 
Clark, Robt., of Scotland, miner, aged 28 years, single.
 
Cohard, Henry, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, married with four children.
 
Compasso, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married with two children.
 
Conlon, Henry, of Cherry, miner, aged 21 years, single with three dependents.
 
Costi, Angelo, of Cherry, miner, aged 23 years, single.
 
Costi, Lewis, of Cherry, miner, aged 22 years, single.
 
D
 
Davis, Jono. G., of Cherry, trapper, aged 17 years, single.
 
Debulka, John, of Cherry, driver, aged 27 years, married.
 
Demesey, Fred, of Cherry, miner, aged 29 years, single.
 
Denalfi, Francisco, of Cherry, miner, aged 30 years, married, with one child.
 
Detourney, Victor, of Cherry, miner, aged 36 years, married, with three children.
 
Donaldson, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 46 years, married, with three children.
 
Dovin, Andrew, of Cherry, miner, aged 49 years, married, with eight children.
 
Dovin, George, of Cherry, miner, aged 18 years, single.
 
Dumont, Leopold, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, single.
 
Dunko, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 22 years, married, with one child.
 
Durand, Benjamin, of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, married, with one child.
 
Durdan, Andrew, of Cherry, timberman helper, additional information not reported..
 
E
 
Elario, Miestre, of Cardiff, miner, aged 24 years, single.
 
Elko, George, of Austria, miner, aged 18 years, single.
 
Eloses, Peter, of Italy, miner, aged 23 years, single.
 
Erickson, Chas., of Cherry, miner, aged 55 years, single.
 
Erickson, Eric, of Cherry, timberman, aged 39 years, additional information not reported..
 
F
 
Farlo, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 30 years, single.
 
Fayen, Peter, of Cherry, miner, aged 40 years, married, with one child.
 
Fogach, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, married, with four children.
 
Francisco, August, of Cherry, driver, aged 23 years, single.
 
Francisco, John, of Cherry, timberman, aged 48 years, married, with nine children.
 
Freebirg, Ole, of Cherry, timberman, aged 35 years, single.
 
G
 
Garabelda, Jno., of Italy, miner, aged 35 years, single.
 
Garletti, J., miner, aged 29 years, additional information not reported..
 
Garletti, Jno., miner, aged 19 years, single, with seven dependents, his mother and six children.
 
Geckse, Frank, miner, aged 20 years, additional information not reported..
 
Gialcolzza, Angone, of Cedar Point, miner, aged 33 years, married, with two children.
 
Gibbs, Lewis, of Cherry, timberman, aged 34 years, single.
 
Governer, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 42 years, married, with three children.
 
Grehaski, Andrew, of Streator, miner, aged 49 years, married, with six children.
 
Grumeth, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, married, with two children.
 
Guidarini, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 41 years, married, with four children.
 
Guglei'm, Peter, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, married, with two children.
 
Gulick, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, married, with three children.
 
Gwaltyeri, Jalindy, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, additional information not reported..
 
H
 
Hadovski, Steve, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, married, with one child.
 
Hainant, August, of Cherry, miner, aged 25 years, single.
 
Halko, Mike, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, married.
 
Halofcak, Dan, of Cherry, miner, aged 45 years, married, with eight children.
      Rescued on November 29, but died 48 hours later.
 
Harpka, Joseph., of Austria, miner, aged 52 years, married, with seven children.
 
Howard, Alfred, of Cherry, trapper, aged 16 years, single.
 
Howard, Samuel, of Cherry, miner, aged 20 years, single, with one dependent.
 
Hudar, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 45 years, married, with six children.
 
Hyhds, William, of Cherry, miner, aged 25 years, married, with one child.
 
J
 
James, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 43 years, married, with one child.
 
Jamison, James, of Oglesby, driver, aged 20 years, single.
 
Janavizza, Joe, miner, additional information not reported..
 
K
 
Kanz, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 42 years, married, with four children.
 
Kenig, John, of Austria, miner, aged 42 years, married, with six children.
 
Klaeser Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 41 years, married, with two children.
 
Klemiar, Geo., of Cherry, miner, aged 56 years, married, with two children.
 
Klemiar, Richard, of Cherry, miner, aged 24 years, married.
 
Klemiar, Thomas, of Cherry, miner, aged 55 years, married, with one child.
 
Kliklumas, Dominick, of Cherry, driver, aged 24 years, single.
 
Kometz, John, of Streator, miner, aged 53 years, married, with three children.
 
Korvonia, Antone, of Cherry, miner, aged 21 years, single.
 
Korvonia, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married, with one child.
 
Kovocivio, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 38 years, married, additional information not reported..
 
Krall, Alfred, of Cherry, miner, aged 15 years, single.
 
Krall, Henry, of Cherry, miner, aged 56 years, married, with four children.
 
Kroll, Alex. S., of Cherry, miner, aged 23 years, married.
 
Kussner, Julius, of Cherry, miner, aged 30 years, additional information not reported..
 
Kutz, Paul, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married, with two children.
 
L
 
Lallie, Frank, of Italy, miner, aged 21 years, single.
 
Leadache, Frank, of Cherry, driver, aged 20 years, single.
 
Leadache, James, of Cherry, trapper, aged 40 years, married, with three children.
 
Leadache, Joseph, of Cherry, trapper, aged 16 years, single.
 
Leptack, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, married, with one child.
 
Leynaud, Urban, of Cherry, miner, aged 37 years, married, with three children.
 
Leyshon, Chas., of Wales, miner, aged 24 years, single.
 
Lonzetti, Selicomo, of Italy, miner, aged 32 years, married, with two children.
 
Lonzotti, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, married.
 
Love, David, of Scotland, miner, aged 24 years, married, with two children.
 
Love, James, of Scotland, miner, aged 26 years, married, with two children.
 
Love, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 34 years, married, with two children.
 
Love, Morrison, of Scotland, miner, aged 31 years, married, with two children.
 
Lukatchko, Andrew, of Cherry, miner, aged 35 years, married, with three children.
 
Lurnas, Mike, of Italy, timberman, single.
 
M
 
Maceoha, Jno., of Old Country, miner, aged 26 years, married, with one child.
 
Malinoski, Joe, of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, single.
 
Mani, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 56 years, married, with two children.
 
Marchiona, Archie, miner, aged 52 years, married.
 
Marchiona, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, married, with one child.
 
Masenetta, Anton, of Cherry, miner, aged 25 years, married, with two children.
 
Matear (or Mactear), Wm., of Cherry, miner, aged 30 years, married.
 
Mayelemis, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 27 years, single.
 
Mayersky, Jno., of Cherry, timberman, aged 39 years, married, with five children.
 
Mazak, Jno., of Cherry, timberman, married, with three children.
 
Mazenetto, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 18 years, single.
 
McCandless, Robert, of Scotland, miner, aged 27 years, single.
 
McCrudden, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 25 years, single.
 
McCrudden, Peter, of Cherry, miner, aged 48 years, married with four children.
 
McFadden, Andrew, of Spring Valley, driver, aged 22 years, single.
 
McGill, Jno., Jr., of Cherry, miner, aged 17 years, single.
 
McLuckie, Andrew, of Cherry, timberman, aged 31 years, married, with five children.
 
McMullen, Geo., of Cherry, miner, aged 24 years, married with two children.
 
Meicora, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 36 years, married, with three children.
 
Merdior, Arthur, of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, married, with one child.
 
Mekles, Tony,, of Cherry, miner, aged 54 years, married, additional information not reported..
 
Miller, Edward, of Cherry, miner, aged 31 years, married, with two children.
 
Miller (or Malner), Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 39 years, married, with five children.
 
Miller (or Malner), Lewis, of Cherry, miner, aged 19 years, single.
 
Mills, Arthur, of Cherry, miner, aged 29 years, married, with two children.
 
Mills, Edward, of Cherry, miner, aged 44 years, married, with three children.
 
Mittle, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 37 years, married, with three children.
 
Mokos, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 43 years, married, with one child.
 
Mohahan, James R., of Cherry, miner, aged 62 years, married, with three children.
 
Mumetich, Hasan, of Cherry, miner, aged 20 years, additional information not reported..
 
N
 
Norberg, Alex, of Cherry, mine manager, aged 37 years, married, with two children.
 
Norberg, August, of Cherry, timberman, aged 34 years, single.
 
O
 
Olson, Chas. P., of Cleveland, O., miner, aged 50 years, single.
 
Ondurko, Matt, of Cherry, miner, aged 26 years, married, with five children.
 
Ossek, Donaty, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, married, with three children.
 
Ossek, Martin, of Cherry, miner, aged 36 years, married.
 
P
 
Packo, Andrew, of Cherry, miner, aged 37 years, married, with two children.
 
Palmori, Albert, of Italy, miner, aged 50 years, married, with seven children.
 
Papea, Chas., of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married, with two children.
 
Pauline, Antona, of Cherry, driver, aged 26 years, married, with one child.
 
Pavoloski, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 27 years, married, with three children.
 
Pearson, Alex, of Old Country, miner, aged 30 years, single.
 
Pearson, John, of Sweden, miner, aged 37 years, single.
 
Perbacher, Peter, of Austria, miner, aged 49 years, married with six children.
 
Perono, Dominick, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, married, with four children.
 
Pete, Ben, of Cherry, miner, aged 35 years, additional information not reported.
 
Pressenger, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married, with three children.
 
Prich, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 38 years, married.
 
Prusitus, Perys, of Cherry, miner, aged 39 years, married, with four children.
 
Prusitus, Peter, of Cherry, miner, aged 38 years, married, with four children.
 
Pshak, John, of Cherry, timberman, aged 42 years, married, with five children.
 
R
 
Raviso, Joe, miner, additional information not reported.
 
Repsel, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 29 years, married, with one child.
 
Repsel, Martin, of Cherry, miner, aged 36 years, married, with four children.
 
Ricca, Cega, miner, aged 30 years, additional information not reported.
 
Richards, Thomas, of Cherry, miner, aged 21 years, married.
 
Rimkus, Joseph, of Cherry, driver, aged 27 years, single.
 
Rittle, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 37 years, married, with two children.
 
Riva, Joseph, of Italy, miner, aged 27 years, single.
 
Robezza, Joseph, driver, single, additional information not reported.
 
Rodonis, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married, with four children.
 
Rolland, Victor, miner, aged 18 years, additional information not reported.
 
Rossman, Robert, of Cherry, trapper, aged 17 years, single, supporting mother and five children.
 
Ruggesie, Gailamyo, of Cherry, miner, aged 25 years, additional information not reported.
 
Ruygiesi, Frank, of Cherry, driver, aged 21 years, single.
 
S
 
Sarbelle, Julius, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, married, with one child.
 
Sarginto, August, of Cherry, miner, aged 25 years, married, with three children.
 
Sandeen, Olaf, of Cherry, miner, aged 50 years, with four dependent children.
 
Scotland, William, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, married, with three children.
 
Seitz, Edward, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, married, with four children.
 
Seitz, Paul, of Cherry, miner, aged 24 years, married, with two children.
 
Semboa (or Sereba), J., of Cherry, miner, additional information not reported.
 
Sestak, Jno., miner, aged 25 years, single.
 
Shemia, Jno., of Cherry, miner, aged 40 years, married, with six children.
 
Siamon, Andrew, miner, aged 34 years, married.
 
Smith, John W., of Cherry, miner, aged 46 years, married, with three children.
 
Sopko, Cantina, miner, aged 24 years, single, additional information not reported.
 
Speir, James, miner, aged 34 years, married, with six children.
 
Ssermel, Antone, miner, aged 36 years, married, additional information not reported.
 
Stam, Antone, of Spring Valley, timberman, aged 44 years, single.
 
Stanchez, Frank, miner, aged 30 years, married, with two children.
 
Staszeski, Tony, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married, with one child.
 
Stearns, James, of Cherry, miner, aged 40 years, married, with one child.
 
Stark, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 35 years, married, with three children.
 
Steele, Peter, of Streator, miner, aged 24 years, single.
 
Stefenelli, Dominick, of Cherry, miner, aged 39 years, married, with five children.
 
Stettler, Harry, of Cherry, miner, aged 24 years, married, with two children.
 
Stewart, Harry, of Cherry, laborer, aged 28 years, married, with four children.
 
Sublich, Charles, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, married, with two children.
 
Suffen, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 39 years, married, with two children.
 
Suhe, John, of Cherry, miner, aged 17 years, single.
 
Suhe, Mike, of Cherry, miner, aged 44 years, married, with two children.
 
Sukitus, Joseph, of Russia, miner, aged 30 years, married, with three children.
 
Szabrinski, Jno., known as Smith, Joh, of Cherry, cager, aged 29 years, married, with one child.
 
T
 
Talioli, Eugene, of Cherry, miner, aged 38 years, married, with four children.
 
Tamarri, Pasquale, miner, aged 25 years, married.
 
Tamashanski, Joseph, of Old Country, miner, aged 28 years, single.
 
Teszone, George, of Cherry, timberman, aged 28 years, married, with two children.
 
Tinko, Andrew, of Cherry, spragger, aged 17 years, single.
 
Tinko, Joseph, Jr., of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, married, with five children.
 
Tinko, Joseph, Sr., of Cherry, miner, aged 51 years, married, with three children.
 
Tinko, Steve, of Cherry, miner, aged 24 years, single.
 
Tonnelli, Emilia, of Cherry, miner, aged 30 years, married, with four children.
 
Tonner, John, of Cherry, trackman, aged 47 years, married, with two children.
 
Tosseth, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 29 years, married, with one child.
 
Turchi, Nocenti, of Cherry, miner, aged 31 years, single.
 
U
 
Ugo, Flippe, of Cherry, trackman, aged 28 years, married.
 
W
 
Waite, Chas., of Cherry, mine examiner, aged 42 years, married, with one child.
 
Welkas, Anthony, of Cherry, miner, aged 29 years, married, with one child.
 
White, Geo., of Cherry, miner, aged 54 years, married, with two children.
 
Wyatt, Wm., of Cherry, timberman helper, aged 35 years, married, with five children.
 
Y
 
Yacober, Frank, of Cherry, miner, aged 47 years, married, with two children.
 
Yagoginiski, Frank, of Cherry, driver, aged 34 years, married, with five children.
 
Yannis, Peter, miner, additional information not reported.
 
Yearley, Joseph, of Spring Valley, driver, aged 20 years, single.
 
Yurcheck, Antone, of Cherry, miner, aged 32 years, married, with four children.
 
Z
 
Zacherria, Giatano, of Cherry, miner, aged 40 years, married, with three children.
 
Zeikell, Pat, of Cherry, miner, aged 28 years, married, with three children.
 
Zekuia, Joseph, of Cherry, miner, aged 33 years, married, with seven children.
 
Zliegley, Thos., miner, aged 27 years, additional information not reported.
 

Sources :
 
1 A Compilation of the Reports of the Mining Industry of Illinois
                from the Earliest Records to 1954
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois;

8 Twenty-Ninth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1910
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1911

 

Coal & Coal Mining in Illinois
 
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