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Coal & Coal Mining
History & Genealogy

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      For us to remember the men and women who have given so much so that we can have the freedom and lifestyle that we enjoy today, is a great responsibility we should not take lightly.
 
      Many historians concentrate on the famous and the infamous, and tend to overlook the people who gave their all to create and perpetuate this country.
 
      Many genealogists try to connect to some ancestor who is well known in history, even if they stretch the truth a little.
 
      The data contained on these pages of this website are intended to pay homage to those who sacrificed much, and maybe even gave their life.

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Coal Mining in
Illinois
Coal Mining in
Indiana
Coal Mining Histry & Genealogy During the Early Years
 
Coal Mines ~ Explosions ~ Fatalities ~ Injuries ~ Photographs

 
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1911
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Illinois - Indiana
J. J. McNamara and Burns Indicted 5
      Eight indictments against three persons in the dynamiting and kidnapping cases were returned in criminal court at Indianapolis by the Marion county grand jury. After a conference. Judge Markey and Prosecutor Baker announced that John J. McNamara, secretary-treasurer of the International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers, had been indicted on a charge of conspiracy to dynamite the structural bridge work of the Peoria & Pekin Union Railroad Company, at Peoria, Ill. They said they believed this announcement was permissible on account of the fact that McNamara is under arrest at Los Angeles. They also announced that “as William J. Burns is under a $10,000 bond from this court, it is permissible to announce that he has been indicted on a charge of kidnapping John J, McNamara." The judge and prosecutor would say nothing further, but it is known that only one other person was indicted. This indictment is against James Hossick, a city detective of Los Angeles, Cal., who took McNamara to California. He is charged with kidnapping John J. McNamara. Three of the eight indictments are against McNamara, and it is understood two of them charge him with having unlawfully stored explosives in Indiana.

1936 3
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Illinois
      Coal-mine workers in Illinois produced nearly 12 percent of the output of bituminous coal in the United States in 1936 and had an injury rate 58 percent higher than the average rate for bituminous-coal mines in the country as a whole. The rate for the State was higher for each of the seven main causes of accidents in bituminous-coal mines. However, it was more favorable in 1936 than in 1935, the improvement being particularly notable for accidents due to falls of roof and coal, haulage, and handling materials.
 
Indiana
      Indiana reduced its injury rate for coal mining 19 percent in 1936 compared with 1935, but the rate for the State was 41 percent higher than the average rate for bituminous-coal mining in the United States in 1936. The improvement in 1936 was chiefly in accidents attributed to falls of roof and coal and to haulage. Compared with the rates for the country as a whole, the rates for Indiana were high for falls of roof and coal, haulage, hand tools, and machinery. The State contributed 4 percent to the country's output of bituminous coal during the year.
 
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Holmes Safety Award 1, 2, 3, 4
      The Joseph A. Holmes Safety Association was founded in 1916 by 24 leading national organizations of the mining, metallurgical, and allied industries to commemorate the efforts of Dr. Joseph Austin Holmes, the first director of the United States Bureau of Mines, in trying to reduce accidents and ill health in the mining and allied industries and to promote the doctrines of safety and the conservation of life in those industries. Therefore, the Joseph A. Holmes Safety Association is a national association of national associations.
 
      The first annual meeting of the permanent organization was held in Washington, D. C., on March 4, 1916 and the following resolution was passed giving the object of the association:
      (1) The making of one or more annual awards with or without honorariums, to "be known as the "Holmes Safety Award," for the encouragement of those originating, developing, and installing the most efficient safety devices, appliances, or methods in the mining, quarrying, metallurgical, and mineral industries, previous to the close of the preceding calendar year; these awards to "be the result of reports and investigations made by the secretary and representatives of the Association.
 
      (2) The awarding of suitable medals, from time to time, for personal heroism or distinguished service in the saving of life, in any branch of the mining, quarrying, metallurgical, and mineral industries.
      These awards for meritorious service, or hero awards as hey are frequently called, have been given annually since 1919, and during the 16-year period 1919-1934, 186 awards were issued.
 
      The association has been giving awards annually since 1919, and from 1919 to 1938, inclusive, 921 awards were made, of which 640 covered meritorious safety records of mines, plants, companies, associations, and individuals -- and 281 hero awards; the latter classification includes some awards in 1937 and 1938 to individuals for the efficient application of first-aid methods.
 
Distribution of Hero Awards

      In many instances the persons performing the heroic acts have lost their lives; it has been the aim of the association to stress the taking of due safety precautions and use of good judgment in saving or attempting to save life, and in considering the merit of the cases presented these features have been the deciding factor.
 
Distribution of Safety Awards

      Of the 640 awards for meritorious safety records made since 1927, coal mining holds first place with 284 awards, metal mining is second with 134 awards, and individuals in the coal-mining industry are third with 106 awards.
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Individuals

      No. 40. (1922) A. W. Springs (Gold)
for resuscitating men overcome while exploring mine in search for live miners, Franklin Coal & Coke Co., Royalton, Ill., Explosion, October 27, 1914
 
      No. 139. (1931) William Daniel Bates (Silver)
for risking his life on August 28, 1927, in three attempts to rescue a fellow workman of the Shell Petroleum Corporation, who was unconscious in an atmosphere deficient in oxygen in a well 42 feet deep, Wood River, Ill.
 
      No. 143. (1931) Horace Preston Moore (Bronze)
for incurring considerable personal risk on November 7, 1930 in saving the life of a fellow workman of the Shell Petroleum Corporation, who was overcome by gas while working on a stack 160 feet high, Wood River, Ill.
 
      No. 148. (1931) Mike John Bady (Certificate of Honor)
for incurring personal risk on August 28, 1927, in attempting to rescue a fellow workman of the Shell Petroleum Corporation (Wood River, Ill.) who was unconscious in an atmosphere deficient in oxygen in a well 42 feet deep
 
      No. 149. (1931) George Ray Daniels (Certificate of Honor)
for incurring the personal risk of being overcome by gas in rescuing a fellow workman, who was unconscious in a tank car at the East Chicago Refinery of the Shell Petroleum Corporation on April 16, 1929.
 
      No. 152. (1931) James Noble Marchino (Certificate of Honor)
for incurring personal risk on August 28, 1927, in attempting to rescue a fellow workman of the Shell Petroleum Corporation (Wood River, Ill.) who was unconscious in an atmosphere deficient in oxygen in a well 42 feet deep
 
      No. 154. (1932) Henry Couch (Silver Medal of Honor)
for serious risking his life in assisting in the successful rescue of a blasting foreman who was caught under falling roof material in the mine of the Ajax Coal Company, Bulan, Kentucky, July 26, 1931,
 
      No. 155. (1932) Jesse Engle (Silver Medal of Honor)
for serious risking his life in assisting in the successful rescue of a blasting foreman who was caught under falling roof material in the mine of the Ajax Coal Company, Bulan, Kentucky, July 26, 1931.
 
      S. A. 204 (1933) Henry C. Lightenfeld, Centralia, Illinois
for having worked 44 of the past 50 years without a lost-time accident, chiefly as a coal loader in solid shooting coal mines, this record continuing to date.
 
      S. A. 276 (1934) Brownlow Estes, Bardo, Kentucky
for having worked 55(one half) years in coal mines in Kentucky without a lost-time accident.
 
      S. A. 277 (1934) Harry G. Knight, St. Johns, Illinois
for having worked without a lost-time accident for th last 57 years of his approximately 62 years of employment in coal mines around DuQuoin, Illinois.
 
      S. A. 283 (1934) William Wilkerson, DeSoto, Illinois
for working practically 75 years without a lost-time accident in coal mines of England and the United States, from 1856, when he was 9 years old, to 1930, when he retired at the age of 83.
 
      437. (1936) Evan William Evans Christopher, Illinois
for more than 49 years' employment in coal mines of the United States without incurring a lost-time accident or injury, and still being actively engaged in the coal mining industry after having worked successively as trapper, loader, fireman, hoisting engineer, and tracklayer.
 
      440. (1936) James B. Hutton, Peoria, Illinois
for having worked in the coal mines of Ohio and Illinois for 64 years without a a lost-time accident, having started in mining 1871 at the age of 12. In hi mining career he has worked chiefly as a loader, timberman, tracklayer, and mule driver, and at age of 76 still works as a coal loader.
 
      447. (1936) Thomas E. Vaughn, Harrisburg, Illinois
for having worked in coal mines for 65 years performing essentially all kinds of work (except ride trips and operate locomotives) without having lost any time on account of injuries; at the age of 78 years he works as a coal loader in Mine 47, Peabody Coal Company, Harco, Illinois.
 
      448. (1936) C. C. Wilson, Mortons Gap, Kentucky
for having acted for 29 years as mine superintendent of the South Hill No. 2 Mine, Hart Coal Corporation, Mortons Gap, Kentucky, which operated without a fatal accident in that period and produced more than 6,000,000 tons of coal with man-hours of exposure estimated to be between 8,500,000 and 8,750,000.
 
      528. (1937) August Frederick Knoefel, M. D., Terre Haute, Indiana
for more than 25 years of outstanding service in the promotion of first-aid and accident prevention in the mineral industries and particularly those of Indiana.
 
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Coal Mines and Mining Companies

      S. A. 15 (1929) Madison Coal Corporation, No. 12 Mine, Dewmaine, Illinois
for having worked an average of 760 men from September 29, 1925 to January 20, 1929 producing 2,211,393 tons of coal without a fatality. an average of 633 men worked through a seven-year period producing 802,434 tons of coal per fatality.
 
      S. A. 16 (1929) O'Gara Coal Company, Harrisburg, Illinois
for having operated nine mines throughout the entire year 1928, employing 2,300 persons and producing 1,313,206 tons of coal without a fatal accident.
 
      S. A. 22 (1930) Odin Coal Company, Odin Mine (Certificate of Honor)
The Joseph A. Holmes Safety Association in March, 1930, awarded a certificate of honor to the Odin mine for having operated from September 15, 1907, to December 31, 1929, inclusive or over 22 years without a fatal accident, producing 4,098,087 tons of coal with 8, 120,464 man-hours exposure.
 
      S. A. 34 (1930) Superior Coal Company, Gillespie, Illinois; (Certificate of Honor)
for the excellent safety record of having produced 1,161,415 tons of coal per fatality during the past seven years. In 1927 its entire four mines produced 2,005,040 tons of coal without a fatality or a total disability.
 
      S. A. 44 (1931) Bell and Zoller Coal and Mining Company, No. 2 Mine, Zeigler, Illinois
for having worked an average force of 1,000 men from August 6, 1928 through December 31, 1930, a total of 3,818760 man-hours, producing 3,115,687 tons of coal without a fatality, having had 697 injuries totaling 7,269 days lost time.
 
      S. A. 47 (1931) Peabody Coal Company, No. 19 Mine, West Frankfort, Illinois
for having worked an average of 541 men a total 4,804308 man-hours, from 1925 to 1929, inclusive, producing 3,276,222 tons of coal, without a fatality.
 
      S. A. 106 (1932) West Kentucky Coal Company, Sturgis, Kentucky
for operating its 10 mines in western Kentucky, employing approximately 2,500 men, working 3,457,000 man-hours, from October 29, 1930, to March 1, 1932, producing 2,737,493 tons of coal without a fatality or a permanent total disability. In 1931 this company produced 1,863,663 tons of coal without a fatality.
 
      S. A. 140 (1933) Bell and Zoller Coal and Mining Company, Zeigler No. 1 Mine, Zeigler, Illinois
for reducing its accident-frequency rate from 340.15 in 1929 to 94.79 in 1932, and its accident-severity rate from 43.74 to 1.43 since the last fatality on December 5, 1930, up to December 31, 1932, the mine hs produced1,735,440 tons of coal with an average of 775 employees working 1,814,416 man-hours; mechanical loading is used throughout.
 
      S. A. 216 (1934) Bell and Zoller Coal and Mining Company, Zeigler No. 1 Mine, Zeigler, Illinois
for reducing its accident-frequency rate from 340.15 in 1929 to 74.04 in 1933 and its severity rate from 43.74 in 1929 to 2.09 in 1933. This mine had no fatalities between December 6, 1930, and February 19, 1934, inclusive, during which period it produced 2,425,824 tons of coal, working a total of 2,544,824 man-hours. A fatality occurred on the surface on February 20, 1934.
 
      S. A. 230 (1934) Linton-Summit Coal Company, No. 1 Mine, Haulage Department, Linton, Indiana
Jack Hays - Haulage Boss
for working without a lost-time accident from September 16, 1932 to January 1, 1934 (and continuing), hauling 485,599 tons of coal in approximately 242,300 pit-car loads and in addition about 24,000 cars of rock, gobbing it in abandoned workings, total man-hours being 43,884. On one day 3,225 tons of coal were hauled.
 
      285. (1935) Bell and Zoller Coal and Mining Company, Zeigler No. 1 Mine, Zeigler, Illinois
for operating from December 5, 1930 to December 7, 1934, without an underground fatality, producing 3,084,565 tons of coal in 3, 154,605 man-hours.
 
      288. (1935) Blue Diamond Coal Company, Middlesboro, Kentucky
for operating 7 mines in Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee through the year 1934, producing 1,588,858 tons of coal with only 1 fatality after which occurrence 835,543 tons were produced: prior to this fatality 1,522,032 tons were mined since the previous fatality. One mine of this company produced 98,278 tons of coal with but 1 injury involving 32 days lost time.
 
      290. (1935) Consolidated Coal Company of St. Louis, Mt. Olive, Illinois
for having produced 1,826,006 tons of coal in 1,646,735 man-hours from the date of the last fatality on February 13, 1932, to January 1, 1935, accident frequency in 1934 being 82.88 and accident severity 5.26. The mine employs 415 men, the coal bed is 7½ feet thick, and the daily output is about 3,600 tons, mechanically loaded.
 
      292. (1935) Diamond Coal Company, Providence, Kentucky
for operating from February 1, 1925, to January 1, 1935, without a fatality, with production of 3,068,632 tons of coal in 1,809 working days, or approximately 3,819,897 man-hours. During 28 years of operation this mine has had only 6 fatalities all caused by an explosion on January l5, 1925. The coal averages 56 inches in thickness and hand loading is used.
 
      299. (1935) Inland Steel Company, Wheelwright Mines Nos. 1 & 2, Wheelwright, Kentucky
for operating without a fatality from October 17, 1933 to February 5, 1935, with an average of 850 men, working 1,780,562 man-hours in the production of 1,021,787 tons of coal.
 
      303. (1935) Knox Consolidated Coal Corporation, No. 1 Mine, Bicknell, Indiana
for reducing accident frequency from 124.85 in 1931 and 187.32 in 1932 to 94.56 in 1933 and 48.16 in 1934; and for reducing accident severity from 49.37 in 1931 to 41.14 in 1932, 42.17 in 1933, and 1.5 in 1934.
 
      311. (1935) Pike Floyd Coal Company, Betsy Layne, Kentucky
for having operated from July 2, 1928 to January 1, 1935, without a fatality, in the production of 2,316,394 tons of coal in 4,450,225 man-hours.
 
      231. (1934) Mary Helen Coal Corporation, Coalgood, Kentucky
for working without a lost-time accident from January 3, 1933, to February 5, 1934 (and continuing).
 
      322. (1935) Valier Coal Company, Valier, Illinois
for having operated 5 of the 12 months of 1934 without a lost-time accident, producing 382,867 tons of coal in 262,369 man-hours, employing 520 persons, daily production averaging 6,601 tons. From September 12, 1934 to January 1, 1935, the mine had no lost-time accidents and worked 194,617 man-hours. From October 1933 to January 1, 1935, the night shift worked 112,643 man-hours and had no lost-time accidents.
 
      364. (1936) The Consolidated Coal Company, Mine No. 15, Mount Olive, Illinois
for having operated without a fatality from February 13, 1932 to January 1, 1936, employing an average of 415 men with an exposure of 2,227,735 man-hours and producing 2,548,838 tons of coal mechanically loaded from a coal bed about 7½ feet thick.
 
      367. (1936) Crescent Coal Company, Bevier, Kentucky
for operating without a fatality from November 1917 to January 1936, with production of 3,050,667 tons of coal.
 
      368. (1936) Diamond Coal Company, Providence, Kentucky
for having operated without a fatality from January 16, 1925 to January 1, 1936, producing 3,386,664 tons of coal, with an exposure of approximately 4,268,664 man-hours. Hand loading is used.
 
      377. (1936) Linton-Summit Coal Company, No. 4 Mine, Linton, Indiana
for having operated without a lost-time accident from July 27, 1934 to July 26, 1935. The mine was opened in 1925 and to January 1, 1936, has operated without a fatality in the production of 754,780 tons of coal.
 
      378. (1936) Luton Mining Company, Luton Mine, Providence, Kentucky
for having operated without a fatal accident from the date of its opening in 1918 to January 1, 1936, production being 1,007,054 tons. The coal is hand loaded from a bed about 58 inches thick.
 
      385. (1936) Northern Illinois Coal Company, Wilmington, Illinois
for having operated without a fatal accident from April 5, 1929 to January 1, 1936, in the production of 6,331,402 tons of coal from a coal bed which is level and about 3 feet thick.
 
      388. (1936) Peabody Coal Company, Mine No. 59, Springfield, Illinois
for having operated without a fatality from July 4, 1930 to October 26, 1935, employing an average force of 295 men with an exposure of 1,870,738 man-hours and producing 1,639,596 tons of coal with hand-loading conveyors from a coal bed 5 feet 8 inches in thickness.
 
      389. (1936) Providence Coal Mining Company, Mines No. 1 & 3, Providence, Kentucky
for having operated without a fatal accident from September 8, 1920 to January 1, 1936, production being 2,813,835.5 tons in approximately 3,940,947 man-hours. The coal is hand-loaded from a bed about 58 inches thick.
 
      395. (1936) Superior Coal Company, Mine No. 3, Gillespie, Illinois
for operating without a fatality from May 28, 1931 to May 13, 1935, with average employment of 500 persons, producing 2,431,618 tons of coal in 2,705, 135 man-hours. No pillar coal is extracted and hand loading conveyors are used in a bed about 7½ feet thick.
 
      396. (1936) Union Colliery Company, Kathleen Mine, Dowell, Illinois
for having operated without a fatality from December 29, 1933 to December 13, 1935, with an average force of 500 men, producing 1,452,452 tons of coal in 1,284,576 man-hours. The coal bed averages 7(one half) feet in thickness and is undulating; the coal is mechanically loaded, and about 5 percent is from pillars.
 
      398. (1936) United Electric Coal Companies, Mine No. 11 (Open Pit), Du Quoin, Illinois
for having operated without a fatality from the opening of the property in 1929 to January 1, 1936, to its average force of 202, producing 5,404,283 tons of coal from a bed 6 feet 5 inches thick underlying 52 feet of clay and rock overburden. This property has had 61 nonfatal accidents, totaling 1,496 days lost-time, and averaged 180 working days annually from 1930 to 1935, inclusive.
 
      401. (1936) Valier Coal Company, No. 1 Mine, Valier, Illinois
for having operated without a fatality from July 6, 1934 to January 1, 1936, exposure being 843,112 man-hours and production 1,209, 176 tons of coal, 774,852 tons being produced mechanically in 1935 bya an average of 540 employees and with but 8 lost-time accidents. Severity was 29.90 in 1927 and but 2.22 in 1935. The 66 surface employees had no lost-time accidents from November 1933 to January 1, 1936, in 240,160 man-hours, handling 1,726 tons of coal.
 
      402. (1936) West Kentucky Coal Company, Kentucky Block No. 2 Mine, Madisonville, Kentucky
for having operated without a fatality from May 21, 1929 to January 1, 1936, producing 1,067,341 tons of coal.
 
      403. (1936) West Kentucky Coal Company, West Kentucky No. 3 Mine, Wheatcroft, Kentucky
for having operated without a fatality to its underground workers from 1926 to January 1, 1936, producing 1,456,879 tons of coal.
 
      404. (1936) West Kentucky Coal Company, West Kentucky No. 8 Mine, Wheatcroft, Kentucky
for having operated without a fatality to its underground workers from 1911 to January 1, 1936, producing 1,915,645 tons of coal.
 
      461. (1937) Consolidation Coal Company, Mine No. 206, Jenkins, Kentucky
for having operated without a fatality, from December 27, 1933 to February 1, 1937
 
      464. (1937) Diamond Coal Company, Providence, Kentucky
for having operated, without a fatality, from January 16, 1925 to January 1, 1937, in the production of 3,848,635 tons of coal, all hand-loaded, in 4,887,719 man-hours. Production in 1936 was 461,971 tons with exposure of 619,055 man-hours.
 
      468. (1937) The Koppers Coal Company, Coxton Mine, Corton, Kentucky
for having operated, without a lost-time accident, from August 2, 1935 to January 31, 1937, producing 364,527 tons of coal in 474,724 man-hours.
 
      469. (1937) North-East Coal Company, Thealka, Kentucky
for operating without a fatality from April 25, 1928 to January 1, 1937, employing an average force of 300 men and producing 1,487,976 tons of coal from a bed about 3 feet thick. 25 percent of the production being from pillars and about 90 percent by hand-loading methods.
 
      470. (1937) Peabody Coal Company, No. 43 Mine, Harrisburg, Illinois
for operating without a fatality from October 9, 1930 to January 1, 1937, producing 1,124,376 tons of coal in 1,406,937 man-hours, average number of men employed being approximately 375. Mechanical loading is now used but hand-loading was employed during part of the above period.
 
      484. (1937) United Electric Coal Companies, Mine No. 11, Du Quoin, Illinois
for operating without a fatality from September 26, 1929 to July 25, 1936, producing 6,041,748 tons of coal and removing approximately 92,600,000 tons of overburden from an open-pit mine.
 
      486. (1937) Valier Coal Company, Mine No. 1, Valier, Illinois
for operating, without a fatality, from July 7, 1934 to January 1, 1937, employing 550 men 1,529,208 man-hours in the production of 2,317,285 tons of coal. This gassy mine is highly mechanized and the coal is extracted from a bed averaging 8 feet in thickness.
(See fig. 6.)
Valier Coal Company presentation
Figure 6. T. J. Thomas, president of the Valier Coal Co., with employees of the company,
at the time of the presentation of the award made in 1937 to the Mine No. 1 by the
Joseph A. Homes Safety Association

 
      538. (1938) Diamond Coal Company, Providence, Kentucky
for operating without a fatality from January 16, 1925 to January 1, 1938, in the production of 4,133,473 tons of coal, all hand loaded, by an average of 360 men working 5,259,828 man-hours in a practically level coal bed about 4 feet 8 inches thick.
 
      556. (1938) Valier Coal Company, Mine No. 1, Valier, Illinois
for having worked from July 6, 1934 to January 1, 1938, a total of 2,227,727 man-hours, producing 3,427,008 tons of coal without a fatality. This mine is fully mechanized.
 
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Petroleum Plants and Companies

      431. (1936) Indian Refining Company, Lawreceville Refinery, Lawrence, Illinois
for having operated a petroleum refinery without a lost-time accident for the full year ending December 5, 1935, with an average force of 600 persons working approximately 1,100,000 man-hours.
 
      432. (1936) The Ohio Oil Company Refeinery, Robinson, Illinois
for having operated without a lost-time accident from September 1, 1932 to November 1, 1935, employing an average of 374 men with an exposure of 2,201,315 man-hours.
 
      433. (1936) Shell Petroleum Corporation, St. Louis, Missouri
for outstanding performance in periods of long-time operation (1,000,000) or more man-hours) without a disabling accident: Wood River, Ill., Refinery, one period of 1,093,824 man-hours and one of 1,048,789; Car Repair Dept., 1,052446 man-hours; Lube compounding Dept., 1,068,820 man-hours; Norco, La., Refinery, 1,835,850 man-hours; Engineering Field Dept., 1,929,478 man-hours; Houston, Texas, Refinery, 1,176,823 man-hours; and Tonkawa, Okla., Production Dist., 1,413,229 man-hours.
(See fig. 5)
Shell Petroleum certificate
Figure No. 5 -- Certificate of honor awarded the Shell Petroleum Corporation, St. Louis, Mo. March 5, 1936

 
      434. (1936) Standard Oil Company, Whiting Refinery, Whiting, Indiana
for having operated a petroleum refinery without a lost-time accident during 2,773,435 man-hours, one of the best accident records in the petroleum industry to date.
 
      520. (1937) Empire Oil & Refining company, East Chicago Refinery, East Chicago, Indiana
for completing (on June 14, 1936) two years of operation without a disabling injury among 480 employees who worked 1,448,000 man-hours.
 
      522. (1937) Shell Petroleum Corporation, East Chicago Refinery, East Chicago, Indiana
for operating from December 21, 1935 to August 24, 1936, without a disabling injury to its 794 employees in 1,039,372 man-hours of exposure.
 
      590. (1938) Standard Oil Company (Indiana), Whiting Refinery, Whiting, Indiana
for operating 3,631,697 man-hours without a lost-time accident, from November 24, 1936 to May 9, 1937, with an average of 3,645 employees. This refinery also worked 2,907,341 man-hours without a lost-time accident from May 24, 1937 to October 3, 1937
 
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Cement Plants and Quarries

      510. (1937) Columbia Quarry Company, Quarry No. 1, Krause, Illinois
for working an average force of 110 men 759,656 man-hours without a lost-time accident from September 22, 1932 to January 1, 1937, producing approximately 2,000 tons of crushed stone per shift.
 
      583. (1938) Columbia Quarry Company, Krause No. 1 Quarry, Krause, Illinois for operating without a lost-time accident from September 22, 1932 to February 1, 1938, working an average of 110 men with 985,587 man hours of exposure and producing 1,700,398 tons of rock.
 
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Sources :
 
  1 Some Safety Records in Illinois Coal Mines; by A. U. Miller, April 1931
            Department of Commerce, United States Bureau of Mines

  2 The Joseph A. Holmes Safety Association and Its Awards,
            by D. Harrington, February 1935, United States Bureau of Mines, Department of Interior

  3 Coal Mine Accidents in the United States : 1936, Bulletin 420
            Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior

  4 The Joseph A. Holmes Safety Association and Its Awards, 1940
            United States Bureau of Mines, Department of Interior, Bulletin 421

  5 Fuel Magzine, Vol. 17, No. 1, Chicago, Illinois, June 27, 1911

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